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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Sean Phillips

The background for university libraries in Ireland is almost identical to that in other EU countries: rapid expansion in student numbers and materials price inflation not…

Abstract

The background for university libraries in Ireland is almost identical to that in other EU countries: rapid expansion in student numbers and materials price inflation not being matched by reciprocal funding. Among positive steps to combat this EU programmes are noted and co‐operative initiatives, notably the IRIS and ALCID projects are discussed. National developments are examined, including the activities of the Information Society Commission and moves towards a national library/information policy. The effects of the Universities Act 1997 are also considered. Future strategy is discussed, particularly the pressures for collaboration and distributed systems and their relevance specifically to research libraries considered.

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Library Review, vol. 47 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

SEAN PHILLIPS

For the Republic of Ireland, as for most European countries, the period since the Second World War has been one of growth and expansion in higher education. This has…

Abstract

For the Republic of Ireland, as for most European countries, the period since the Second World War has been one of growth and expansion in higher education. This has resulted partly from a growing population of young people and partly from the demand for trained manpower in response to increasing industrialisation and technological change. Total enrolment in all sectors of higher education trebled from 15,000 in 1950 to more than 45,000 in 1983, and during the same period the number of students in the universities rose from 8,000 to 27,000. The rapid increase in enrolments led to the appointment of a Commission on Higher Education which reported in 1967. Many of its recommendations have been overtaken by subsequent developments, but two central themes were that increased state investment in higher education was a precondition of social and economic progress, and that the growing demand for higher education was so large and so diverse that new institutions should be established to cope with it. Accordingly, in addition to expansion in virtually all the existing universities and colleges, two new national institutes of higher education have been established since 1970, together with nine regional technical colleges, in which the emphasis is on courses in the applied sciences and technological and business studies. As far as state investment in higher education is concerned, around 80% of the financial provision for almost all the institutions is derived from state funds. The distribution of these funds to the universities and national institutes of higher education is one of the functions of the Higher Education Authority, a body established in 1968 on the recommendation of the Commission, and whose other functions include the continuous review of the need for and provision of higher education, and the coordination of financial planning and development.

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Library Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Norma McDermott

This paper reviews current trends in interlending and document supply in Ireland and speculates on the issues and implications raised by the increase in British Library…

Abstract

This paper reviews current trends in interlending and document supply in Ireland and speculates on the issues and implications raised by the increase in British Library interlending and document supply charges. The pressures on library and information services, both public and academic, to provide efficient means of access to an increasing amount of (electronic) materials for full‐ and part‐time students as well as those pursuing distance learning programmes are discussed. The role of the new electronic environment in facilitating learning by both the academic and the wider community is also described. Concludes by stressing that co‐operation is essential but comes at a cost.

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Edward W. Russell and Dick G. Bvuma

The new South Africa came into being in 1994. The new government inherited the national public service and those of a variety of former provinces and homelands that had to…

Abstract

The new South Africa came into being in 1994. The new government inherited the national public service and those of a variety of former provinces and homelands that had to be amalgamated to form a national unified public service. Although this task was accomplished rapidly, the resulting public service was very large, and exhibited many features of traditional bureaucracy, including hierarchical structures, limited automation and IT applications, low levels of training, a poor work culture, language and cultural barriers, and an overall orientation towards inputs and processes rather than service delivery and results. Within the first three years of the new order, substantial effort was devoted to reforming the bureaucracy. New public service legislation and regulations were introduced, new and powerful central personnel agencies were created, English became the language of administration, and substantial authority was devolved to departments and provinces. Despite these reforms, progress in improving results in terms of service delivery, especially to previously disadvantaged communities, was mixed. Towards the end of the 1990s increased attention was paid to means of improving service delivery. Three important initiatives in this regard were Batho Pele (1997), the adoption of eight nationwide principles for better service delivery; a public private partnerships initiative (2000) and the promotion of alternative service delivery. While alternative service delivery initiatives are largely at pilot stage, they offer a promising alternative both to traditional bureaucracy (with its cost and poor service delivery focus) and to a narrow version of privatisation (which could involve heavy social costs, job losses, and regressive redistribution of wealth). This paper reviews these developments and outlines some promising alternative service delivery pilot projects.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Suhaib Riaz and Sean Buchanan

This paper aims to present a critical interpretation of unfolding events related to corporate and policymaking elites during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic crisis to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a critical interpretation of unfolding events related to corporate and policymaking elites during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic crisis to serve as a point of contrast to mainstream views.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon literature on elite maintenance and power, learning from recent previous crises and emerging evidence during the Covid-19 pandemic crisis, this study develops arguments to question and problematize the exercise of power by elites toward maintenance of existing systems across the pandemic.

Findings

Critical examination points attention to three related but analytically distinct strategies in the exercise of elite power: reinforcing myths, redirecting blame and reclaiming positions, all directed to maintain the system and preserve power. The potential effects of this ongoing elite maintenance are highlighted, revealing the old and new forms of power likely to emerge at the corporate, national and global levels across the pandemic crisis and endure beyond it.

Social implications

It is hoped that the critical examination here may build more awareness about the deep and complex nature of elite power and systems across the globe that preclude meaningful system change to address societal challenges. It may thereby provide more informed engagement toward system change.

Originality/value

The main originality of the paper lies in its attempt to tie together the various types of elite maintenance works and their potential effects into an overarching narrative. Making these connections and interpreting them from a critical perspective provides a rare large-canvas picture of elite power and system maintenance, particularly across a global crisis.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Allan de Guzman, Sean Frances Barredo and Kim Rajah Caillan

Previous studies suggest that the care for elderly prisoners is a growing problem. The emerging phenomenon such as the correctional ageing crisis is an urgent concern that…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies suggest that the care for elderly prisoners is a growing problem. The emerging phenomenon such as the correctional ageing crisis is an urgent concern that needs to be collectively and holistically addressed from a multi-sectoral perspective. In a developing country, like the Philippines, where prison congestion is alarming, the need for more empirical investigations that probe into the prison life and services is warranted to better inform penal policy and practice that would improve health outcomes among incarcerated individuals. The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which depression among Filipino elderly prisoners shape their food choices.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 160 Filipino elderly prisoners of age 60 and above from October to November 2018 was conducted using a three-part research instrument, which consists of a personal and nutrition-related checklist, 15-point geriatric depression scale and a set of cards that were ranked and sorted through the balanced incomplete block design.

Findings

Results of the survey were subjected to conjoint analysis and structural equation modeling using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 24. Interestingly, taste was the most considered attribute (30.765%) while portion size (9.759%) is the least considered by the Filipino elderly prisoners. Notably, depression has a significant positive effect on their food preferences in all attributes except portion size.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to two prison settings in the Philippines. Considering the results from the conjoint analysis, strategies can be developed in designing an individualized meal plan suitable for the needs of each elderly prisoner. Also, sizeable government appropriations should be in place to ensure the nutritional quality of food served to aging Filipino prisoners.

Practical implications

Provisions for a pool of nutritionists working hand in hand with other health members would guarantee a prison system that promotes the overall well-being of each prisoner. Further, this study can contribute valuable inputs in the menu cycle practice of prisons in the country. There may be a need to prioritize the nutritional aspect of these vulnerable and deprived groups so as to promote a better quality of life among elderly prisoners. Also, other forms of psychosocial, physical and spiritual health activities extended to elderly prisoners may prevent depressive symptoms.

Originality/value

Conjoint analysis is remarkably gaining prominence in not only the health-care setting (Phillips et al., 2002; Ryan and Farrar, 2000) but also the field of nutrition. It holds a number of unique and practical promises to prison settings.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2013

David M. Gligor and Mary Holcomb

– The purpose of this paper is to understand how personal relationships influence behavior within a supply-chain context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how personal relationships influence behavior within a supply-chain context.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a qualitative methodology that allows for a rich assessment of how buyers and suppliers of logistics services interact within the context of personal relationships (e.g. friendships), that are themselves embedded within interfirm relationships. Based on a grounded theory approach, a model is developed describing how and why personal relationships are important for supply-chain managers to consider when cultivating interfirm connections.

Findings

The findings reveal how managers act/interact within the context of personal relationships, as well as the outcomes/benefits associated with the development of personal relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses qualitative interviews to generate theory. The generalizability of the findings will have to be empirically examined in future research.

Practical implications

Managers can use the findings to understand explicitly what types of benefits personal relationships can yield. Further, this study presents to managers the specific actions that buyers and suppliers of logistics services engage in, when developing a personal relationship, in order to facilitate the generation of positive business outcomes.

Originality/value

A notable weakness in the supply-chain relationship literature is the unfulfilled need for research examining interfirm relationships at a micro/individual level, rather than the traditionally adopted firm-to-firm view, in order to account for the social/relational elements of firm-level relationships. This paper addresses that gap by exploring personal relationships within supply chains.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Blockchain for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-198-1

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Jayson Seaman, Robert MacArthur and Sean Harrington

The article discusses Outward Bound's participation in the human potential movement through its incorporation of T-group practices and the reform language of experiential…

Abstract

Purpose

The article discusses Outward Bound's participation in the human potential movement through its incorporation of T-group practices and the reform language of experiential education in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reports on original research conducted using materials from Dartmouth College and other Outward Bound collections from 1957 to 1976. It follows a case study approach to illustrate themes pertaining to Outward Bound's creation and evolution in the United States, and the establishment of experiential education more broadly.

Findings

Building on prior research (Freeman, 2011; Millikan, 2006), the present article elaborates on the conditions under which Outward Bound abandoned muscular Christianity in favor of humanistic psychology. Experiential education provided both a set of practices and a reform language that helped Outward Bound expand into the educational mainstream, which also helped to extend self-expressive pedagogies into formal and nonformal settings.

Research limitations/implications

The Dartmouth Outward Bound Center's tenure coincided with and reflected broader cultural changes, from the cold war motif of spiritual warfare, frontier masculinity and national service to the rise of self-expression in education. Future scholars can situate specific curricular initiatives in the context of these paradigms, particularly in outdoor education.

Originality/value

The article draws attention to one of the forms that the human potential movement took in education – experiential education – and the reasons for its adoption. It also reinforces emerging understandings of post-WWII American outdoor education as a product of the cold war and reflective of subsequent changes in the wider culture to a narrower focus on the self.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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