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Expert briefing

Outlook for poverty in sub-Saharan Africa.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB207545

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical

Abstract

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Evolving Leadership for Collective Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-878-1

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Article

Joseph Marmol Yap and Yelizaveta Kamilova

The library's role in promoting and supporting the United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) is beyond borders. It has the capacity to be a powerful…

Abstract

Purpose

The library's role in promoting and supporting the United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) is beyond borders. It has the capacity to be a powerful driving force in leading exemplary programs that will transform society in many dimensions. This paper will share the value of libraries in integrating SDG's into their work and how it can positively advocate for change toward attaining an inclusive, open and tolerant society.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey research and program evaluation are designed to solicit opinions from participants of two library programs focusing on gender equality at Nazarbayev University. Data collection was prepared, gathered and analyzed using Qualtrics.

Findings

Participants believed that gender-related programs of the library are positive ways on how to stimulate a gender-balanced society. The programs increased awareness on gender equality among the academic community and promoted the welfare and rights of marginalized sectors. Finally, these programs addressed various stigmas, thus empowering vulnerable groups to stand up to discrimination.

Practical implications

Libraries are safe spaces that advocate social inclusivity.

Social implications

It proves that a library can hold programs in support of SDGs, particularly on gender equality.

Originality/value

This paper shares academic library initiatives in Central Asia, particularly in Kazakhstan, in support of SDGs.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part

Jarrett Blaustein, Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Nathan W. Pino and Rob White

This chapter introduces the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and considers how criminological research, policy and practice can advance this global agenda. It…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and considers how criminological research, policy and practice can advance this global agenda. It critically accounts for the complex geopolitical, institutional and ideological landscapes that gave rise to this agenda and the challenges this poses for implementing the SDGs today. The chapter also raises important questions about the viability and consequentiality of global efforts to govern the nexus between crime, justice and sustainable development on account of the gravest threat to humanity, climate change. We conclude that all of these issues highlight the need for scholars and practitioners with expertise on crime and justice to approach this agenda from a critical standpoint. At the same time, we acknowledge that the SDGs remain the best global framework that we have for promoting safer and more equitable societies.

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The Emerald Handbook of Crime, Justice and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-355-5

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Article

Peter Jones and Daphne Comfort

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) agreed at a United Nations General Assembly in 2015 embrace an ambitious and wide ranging set of global environmental, social and…

Abstract

Purpose

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) agreed at a United Nations General Assembly in 2015 embrace an ambitious and wide ranging set of global environmental, social and economic issues designed to effect a transition to a more sustainable future. The United Nations called on all governments to pursue these ambitious goals but also acknowledged the important role of the private sector in addressing the SDGs. This paper offers an exploratory review of how some of the UK's largest volume housebuilders publicly claim to be committed to addressing the SDGs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an outline of the characteristics of sustainable development, of the SDGs and of the frame of reference and method of enquiry employed in the study, prior to reviewing the findings from the largest UK housebuilders.

Findings

The findings revealed that seven of the largest housebuilding companies claimed to be committed to contributing to the SDGs, though the scale and the extent of their claimed commitments varied. In reviewing the housebuilders approach to the SDGs, the authors drew attention to three challenges the housebuilders may face in pursuing their claimed commitment to the SDGs, namely, concentrating on specific goals, measurement and reporting.

Originality/value

The paper offers an accessible review of how seven of the UK's largest housebuilders claimed to be committed to addressing the SDGs.

Details

Property Management, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article

Simone Pizzi, Fabio Caputo and Andrea Venturelli

The aim of the paper is to understand the differences between “talking” and “walking” about sustainable development goals (SDGs) in state-owned enterprises (SOEs)…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to understand the differences between “talking” and “walking” about sustainable development goals (SDGs) in state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Specifically, the authors have conducted an analysis on 202 entities that operate within the Italian National Healthcare System (INHS) to evaluate the overall degree of transparency in term of contribution to the SDG3.

Design/methodology/approach

The research evaluates the degree of contribution to SDG3 by INHS through the adoption of the theoretical framework proposed by Beck et al. (2010). Specifically, the authors assess the degree of contribution to this goal using an interpretive content analysis that combines the theoretical framework with the 13 targets that composed the SDG3. For the authors’ purposes, they analyze all INHS’s website to evaluate the presence/absence of social reports produced in the periods 2015-2018.

Findings

Although the great contribution to the SDG3, the INHS is characterized by a low degree of accountability. In fact, only 12.21 per cent of INHS’s entities disclosed at least one social report during the observed period. Moreover, the authors’ results denote how the approach of INHS’s entities to social reporting is different both in term of “quality” and “quantity.”

Research limitations/implications

The SOEs play a central role within the Agenda 2030 strategies. However, public managers are less oriented than private managers to adopt non-financial reporting tools. Furthermore, the authors’ results highlight the existence of asymmetric information between SOEs and citizens even if in presence of best practices such as the INHS. In this sense, the adoption of non-financial reports tool to engage in a more effective way with citizens could be a strategic driver for the achievement of highest degree of social legitimacy to operate.

Practical implications

The paper is of use to public managers operating in countries characterized by a high level of contribution to SDGs. Specifically, the authors’ results suggest how the adoption of reporting tools could impact positively in terms of stakeholder’s awareness to SDG themes.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of the central role covered by academics, practitioners and public sectors to SDGs through the adoption of social reporting tools.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article

Isabel B. Franco and James Tracey

Although the value of community capacity building is widely accepted within scholarly literature, these initiatives thus far appear to have achieved very little impact in…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the value of community capacity building is widely accepted within scholarly literature, these initiatives thus far appear to have achieved very little impact in the achievement of community development aspirations. This paper aims to increase knowledge regarding specific priority areas which when targeted will result in more effective pathways towards sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was performed through utilization of a qualitative strategy, which involved the combination of a number of qualitative methods and techniques including individual interviews, surveys, focus groups, literary review and policy analysis.

Findings

The investigation found that improving identified CSD priority areas, aligned with the sustainable development goals (SDGs), seems to be the most effective strategy to enhance the ability of local communities to overcome sustainability challenges over time. SDGs 9, 4, 15, 16, 17 and 8 were identified as the areas of greatest significance for practical community capacity building for sustainable development (CSD).

Originality/value

This paper answers scholarly literature’s call for greater investigation into bringing sustainability research closer to society, to clearly define research direction and agenda. It also recommends ways to action the global goals locally.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part

Anne-Karen Hueske and Caroline Aggestam Pontoppidan

During the last two decades, there has been increasing emphasis on higher education institutions as agents promoting and advancing sustainability. This chapter addresses…

Abstract

During the last two decades, there has been increasing emphasis on higher education institutions as agents promoting and advancing sustainability. This chapter addresses how sustainability is integrated into management education at higher education institutions. It is based on a systematic literature review that teases out governance, education, research, outreach and campus operations (GEROCO) as key elements for embedding sustainability in management education. In addition, it identifies the important role of having an overall governing strategic direction that serves to anchor sustainability. The chapter highlights that sustainability and responsible management education initiatives are interconnected and are complex to embed through the university system.

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Article

Yahya Wisam Al-saeed, Abdullahi Ahmed and Erika Anneli Pärn

The Middle Eastern terrain is expected to encounter unprecedented climatic conditions before the turn of the next century (circa. 80 years), emanating from extreme heat…

Abstract

Purpose

The Middle Eastern terrain is expected to encounter unprecedented climatic conditions before the turn of the next century (circa. 80 years), emanating from extreme heat waves that exceed the critical threshold of habitable conditions. This threatens to cause a significant challenge that is exacerbated by a gap between the supply and demand of affordable energy. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of utilising nearly zero-energy buildings (nZEB) to improve the performance of residential buildings in Iraq and the Middle East.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses Iraq as a case-study because of the breadth of climatic conditions experienced across its wide-reaching territory and also because of the recent critical infrastructural challenges following the geo-political crisis. Three virtual buildings were simulated for Baghdad, Mosul and Basra cities to narrow the confines of the region to achieve nZEB under current and future climatic weather scenarios.

Findings

The findings showed that in all three cases studies, the buildings located within the three climatic regions in Iraq could achieve both significant annual energy reductions as well as nZEB standards which could range from 41 per cent to 87 per cent for current climatic conditions and 40 per cent to 84 per cent by 2080. An analysis has also been carried out for the three case-study cities which revealed significant operational-cost savings achievable through nZEB buildings.

Originality/value

There are currently limited studies that investigate such positive potential for nZEB strategies under the current and predicted future climatic scenarios in the Middle East.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article

Amina Buallay

There are wide debates about the costs and benefits of sustainability reporting. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

There are wide debates about the costs and benefits of sustainability reporting. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between sustainability reporting and a firm’s financial, operational and market performance in order to determine when sustainability reporting benefits a firm and when it adds cost.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined 342 financial institutions within the 20 countries that top the list of achievers of sustainable development goals for the 10 years 2007 through 2016, for a total of 3,420 observations. The independent variable is the environmental, social and governance (ESG) score; the dependent variables are performance indicators (return on assets, return on equity and Tobin’s Q). Two types of control variables are used in this study: firm level and country level.

Findings

The findings deduced from the empirical results demonstrate that, on the one hand, ESG positively affects market performance, which supports value creation theory. On the other hand, ESG negatively affects financial and operational performance, which supports cost-of-capital reduction theory.

Research limitations/implications

This study aims to find how sustainable disclosure can and does play a role in contributing towards performance of financial institutions to eventually achieve country’s sustainable development goals.

Practical implications

The study provides insights into the effect of sustainability reporting on different perspectives of business performance, which might be utilised by financial institutions to re-arrange their disclosure policy to be aligned with their strategy.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the rare prior studies that relate sustainability reporting to indicators of business performance (operational, financial and market).

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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