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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Christian Boris Brunner, Sebastian Ullrich, Patrik Jungen and Franz-Rudolf Esch

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of symbolic product information (symbolic product design) on consumers’ perceived brand evaluations. In an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of symbolic product information (symbolic product design) on consumers’ perceived brand evaluations. In an experimental setting, the authors consider as key factors the congruence between symbolic product design and product category, the level of product involvement as well as brand strength.

Design/methodology/approach

In an experiment of 490 participants, consumers are confronted to different symbolic product designs connotations. Based on the cognitive process modelSARA” (selective activation, reconstruction and anchoring), the authors examined how symbolic product design associations are used as heuristics in the working memory when making brand judgement.

Findings

The results show that product design associations are used in consumers’ information processing as anchor for brand evaluations. This effect is stronger if symbolic design associations are incongruent to the product category because of consumers’ deeper elaboration process. Furthermore, the impact of symbolic product design is higher for weak compared to strong brands.

Research limitations/implications

This research supports the cognitive process modelSARA” being an appropriate foundation explaining the effects of symbolic product design. Further research should extend this experiment, using a field study in a more realistic setting and/or a choice situation between different alternative product designs at the point of sale. Furthermore, the consumers’ elaboration process should be manipulated differently, e.g. in a mental load condition.

Practical implications

Symbolic product design is important to enhance brand association networks in the consumers’ mind, particularly if the brand is weak. Marketers should use incongruent symbolic product information to differentiate from competitors who use “stereotype” product designs.

Originality/value

Research about product design in the marketing discipline is still limited. The authors analyse the impact of symbolic product design on brand evaluations in an experimental setting of 490 respondents in four product categories. The findings support that consumers use product design as heuristics to evaluate brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Stuart Kirby and Ian McPherson

The National Intelligence Model, described as a ‘model for policing’, defines a process for setting priorities and a framework in which problem solving can be applied. Its…

Abstract

The National Intelligence Model, described as a ‘model for policing’, defines a process for setting priorities and a framework in which problem solving can be applied. Its strength is a systematic approach that demands standard products and consistent methods of working, which ensure high levels of ownership and accountability. The problem solving approach can also work within this framework. It provides techniques to assist in analysis and develops the tasking and co‐ordinating mechanism through multi‐agency partnerships, which can deliver more sustainable solutions.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Troy C. Payne, Kathleen Gallagher, John E. Eck and James Frank

The purpose of this paper is to examine how initial frameworks for understanding police problems influence how police analyze and address those problems in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how initial frameworks for understanding police problems influence how police analyze and address those problems in the context of problem-oriented policing. The paper shows why researchers, and police, should pay more attention to problem theories.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this case study were obtained from the Middletown, Ohio Police Department, the Middletown housing authority, and the Butler County auditor. Frequency tables and simple graphs were used to identify patterns in the calls for service. Discussions with police officials were used to describe how police originally conceptualized the problem described.

Findings

The paper found that initial problem framing has a significant impact on the available interventions and that problem solvers should be vigilant against errors of problem identification.

Research limitations/implications

Caution must be taken when generalizing from a single case study. Nevertheless, more attention needs to be placed on problem identification and framing in the problem-solving process.

Practical implications

Police problem solvers should be vigilant against errors in problem identification, particularly when the original problem identification is broad or when interventions based on the original problem frame do not produce the desired effect.

Originality/value

There are few studies that specifically examine the problem identification and definition process. This paper adds to the literature on problem-oriented policing by examining the critical yet understudied process of problem framing. It also adds to our knowledge of place-specific analysis.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Amar Khoukhi

In this paper the problem of the dynamic optimal time‐energy Off‐Line programming of an autonomous mobile robot in a crowded environment is considered. First, kinematic…

Abstract

In this paper the problem of the dynamic optimal time‐energy Off‐Line programming of an autonomous mobile robot in a crowded environment is considered. First, kinematic model and planning are presented. Then a dynamic model based on Euler‐Lagrange formalism is developed and a mobility estimation function of the robot is considered. This dynamic estimation of the robot mobility takes into account of the velocity and the orientation of the robot. Then the scene structuration and a path finder algorithm are developed. After, the optimal dynamic off‐line programming is formulated as a nonlinear programming problem under nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The Discrete Augmented Lagrangian (DAL) is used to obtain the optimal trajectograhy. We develop an extended DAL to DALAP, DALAdaptive Penalty. RoboSim 1.0 simulator is developed to perform kinematic and DALAP based algorithms on a large class of mobile robots optimal time‐energy off‐line programming. A comparative study with kinematic planning is considered. It is shown that the performance of the dynamic optimal time‐energy control and off‐line programming is much better than kinematic and heuristic based schemes. This strategy of trajectory planning was implemented on the case study of the SARA mobile robot model.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2013

Sara E. Green, Rosalyn Benjamin Darling and Loren Wilbers

This chapter reviews qualitative research on parenting children with disabilities published over the last 50 years to explore whether shifts in academic discourse and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter reviews qualitative research on parenting children with disabilities published over the last 50 years to explore whether shifts in academic discourse and changes in professional training have affected research on parenting and/or the experiences of parents who are the subject of such research.

Methodology/approach

An extensive literature search was conducted, and 78 peer-reviewed, qualitative studies on the experience of parenting a child with a disability were included in the sample. Themes were extracted from the reviewed literature and compared across decades.

Findings

The findings of the present review suggest that some aspects of the parenting experience have changed very little. In particular, parents continue to experience negative reactions such as stress and anomie, especially early in their children’s lives, and socially imposed barriers such as unhelpful professionals, and a lack of needed services continue to create problems and inspire an entrepreneurial response. In addition, stigmatizing encounters with others continue to be a common occurrence. In contrast to earlier decades, studies conducted in more recent years have begun to use the social model of disability as an analytic frame and also increasingly report that parents are questioning and challenging the concept of “normal” itself.

Social/practical implications

Additional improvements are needed in professional education and services to reduce the negative reactions experienced by parents of children with disabilities.

Originality/value of chapter

The findings of this meta-analysis can serve as a guide to future research on parenting children with disabilities.

Details

Disability and Intersecting Statuses
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-157-1

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Katherine K. Frankel, Elizabeth L. Jaeger and P.David Pearson

Purpose – Our purpose in this chapter is to argue for the importance of integrating reading and writing in classrooms and to provide examples of what integration of this…

Abstract

Purpose – Our purpose in this chapter is to argue for the importance of integrating reading and writing in classrooms and to provide examples of what integration of this nature looks like in classrooms across content areas and grade levels.Design/methodology/approach – In this chapter we provide an overview of the argument for reading–writing integration, highlight four common tools (skill decomposition, skill decontextualization, scaffolding, and authenticity) that teachers use to cope with complexity in literacy classrooms, and describe four classrooms in which teachers strive to integrate reading and writing in support of learning.Findings – We provide detailed examples and analyses of what the integration of reading and writing in the service of learning looks like in four different classroom contexts and focus particularly on how the four teachers use scaffolding and authenticity to cope with complexity and support their students’ literacy learning.Research limitations/implications – We intentionally highlight four noteworthy approaches to literacy instruction, but our examples are relevant to specific contexts and are not meant to encompass the range of promising practices in which teachers and students engage on a daily basis.Practical implications – In this chapter we provide classroom teachers with four concrete tools for coping with the complexities of literacy instruction in classroom settings and highlight what instruction of this nature – with an emphasis on scaffolding and authenticity – looks like in four different classroom contexts.Originality/value of chapter – Teachers and other educational stakeholders must acknowledge and embrace the complexities of learning to read and write, so that students have opportunities to engage in rich and authentic literacy practices in their classrooms.

Details

School-Based Interventions for Struggling Readers, K-8
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-696-5

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Sefer Yilmaz

This paper aims to suggest that a police organization should prefer change management approaches and methods that would not only lead the organization towards an effective…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to suggest that a police organization should prefer change management approaches and methods that would not only lead the organization towards an effective position in preventing crime and fighting terrorism but also enable it to be in harmony with the organizational environment that answers both the expectations of the organization's employees and of the public.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a discussion paper.

Findings

The goal will be achieved through developing a new approach, namely the “Tailoring model”, setting out from the similarities between the change manager and a tailor, who designs and prepares a garment taking into consideration both the physical characteristics and personal preferences of the client with the environmental conditions where the suit will be worn.

Originality/value

The paper not only adds significant perspectives for police organization managers in conducting reform initiatives to adapt community policing successfully but also contributes to the literature by developing a model for adapting change management approaches on a specific field of police organizations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Sara Cervai and Federica Polo

This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model represents the first attempt of a “quality model” dedicated to the learning outcomes of healthcare trainings.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Created as development of the Expero model (Cervai et al., 2013), the Expero4care model has been tailored for workplace learning in the healthcare sector and tested in six organizations across Europe. The model has been validated through the review of an international team of experts and its approval as QualiCert standard.

Findings

Expero4care allows the evaluation of the quality of learning outcomes focusing on competences, impact in the workplace, transferability, participation and credits. The evaluation process involves different categories of stakeholders (learners, trainers, colleagues, managers, internal or external bodies that can benefit the training’s results, i.e. final users of the service, such as patients and citizens), and it is based on a systematic data collection and comparison among expectations and perceptions. The implementation of the Expero4care model gives the opportunity to start a continuous improvement process of the trainings in the healthcare service.

Research limitations/implications

Expero4care has been tested in both university courses and organizational trainings dedicated to professionals in the healthcare sector. The initial sample is not wide enough to cover all the countries and the types of trainings, so a larger implementation is needed to validate its appropriateness.

Social Implication

Expero4care is the first model created specifically for organizations providing training in the healthcare sector. The implementation of the Expero4care model – adaptable to different kind of organizations and trainings – means that it is possible to highlight the value of the training considering its impact on the workplace and on the citizens.

Originality/value

As the most commonly used tools to assess the quality of trainings consist of questionnaires submitted to participants at the end of the training and considering that quality models have not been utilized to analyse learning outcomes in healthcare, Expero4care represents the first quality model dedicated to training in healthcare service.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Rosie Erol and Andrew Millie

This paper describes how a problem solving approach was used to identify good practice lessons from four community safety projects implemented in Birmingham, and how these…

Abstract

This paper describes how a problem solving approach was used to identify good practice lessons from four community safety projects implemented in Birmingham, and how these lessons were disseminated to meet the different needs of practitioners, managers and a wider community safety audience.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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