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Article

Edita Vujasinović, Zeljka Janković, Zvonko Dragčević, Igor Petrunić and Dubravko Rogale

Today when the newest high‐tech fibers and sophisticated material constructions are used for the production of sails, forming 3D sail shape from 2D sailcloth has still…

Abstract

Purpose

Today when the newest high‐tech fibers and sophisticated material constructions are used for the production of sails, forming 3D sail shape from 2D sailcloth has still remained very primitive because classic sewing techniques are mostly used. Since, the clothing and technical textile industry has been recently using some of contemporary joining techniques (ultrasonic, thermal, high‐frequency) replacing classic sewing, this paper seeks to investigate the possibility of ultrasonic welding in the production of sails, and the strength of obtained bonds.

Design/methodology/approach

Concerning the aim, sails were made employing the classic and modern (ultrasonic) joining technique whereby bonding parameters such as amplitude and welding speed, geometry of anvil wheels were varied. Objective quality evaluation of the bond made in such a way, was performed in order to be more exact about its strength.

Findings

Based on the obtained results it has been concluded that ultrasonic welding may successfully replace the classic sewing of sails, selecting an anvil wheel with suitable engraving and optimal parameters of welding (speed and amplitude).

Practical implications

Selection of optimal welding parameters not only increases the sail's bond strength in comparison with classic seam, but also provides sail air impermeability, being one of the basic aerodynamic requirements for sail making.

Originality/value

This paper has presented the novel and successful approach in 3D sail shape forming from 2D sailcloth.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article

Ali Cheaitou, Sadeque Hamdan and Rim Larbi

This paper aims to examine containership routing and speed optimization for maritime liner services. It focuses on a realistic case in which the transport demand, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine containership routing and speed optimization for maritime liner services. It focuses on a realistic case in which the transport demand, and consequently the collected revenue from the visited ports depend on the sailing speed.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present an integer non-linear programming model for the containership routing and fleet sizing problem, in which the sailing speed of every leg, the ports to be included in the service and their sequence are optimized based on the net line's profit. The authors present a heuristic approach that is based on speed discretization and a genetic algorithm to solve the problem for large size instances. They present an application on a line provided by COSCO in 2017 between Asia and Europe.

Findings

The numerical results show that the proposed heuristic approach provides good quality solutions after a reasonable computation time. In addition, the demand sensitivity has a great impact on the selected route and therefore the profit function. Moreover, the more the demand is sensitive to the sailing speed, the higher the sailing speed value.

Research limitations/implications

The vessel carrying capacity is not considered in an explicit way.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on an important aspect in liner shipping, i.e. demand sensitivity to sailing speed. It brings a novel approach that is important in a context in which sailing speed strategies and market volatility are to be considered together in network design. This perspective has not been addressed previously.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

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Article

Anna Gerke, Herbert Woratschek and Geoff Dickson

There are different streams of research in the service marketing literature concerning value co-creation. Most of the research focuses on value co-creation for the benefit…

Abstract

Purpose

There are different streams of research in the service marketing literature concerning value co-creation. Most of the research focuses on value co-creation for the benefit of the customer. However, value is also co-created for the benefit of the provider, especially in a business-to-business context. The purpose of this research is to understand (1) how value is co-created in a sport business-to-business context (i.e. sailing) and (2) how the prevailing value co-creation approaches explain value co-creation processes differently in a sport business-to-business context.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was contextualised within the Auckland sailing cluster. Primary data were collected via 27 interviews, as well as observations at events. Secondary data include 13 documents of organisational information and archival data. Data were analysed deductively and interpreted using two different theoretical lenses: service-dominant logic (SDL) and service logic (SL).

Findings

The value co-creation analysis of the sailing cluster permitted theorising about relationships in sport management at different levels of aggregation and abstraction. Every actor is embedded in a wider sport eco-system triggered by sport activities and always has a dual role as provider and beneficiary. Actors that are in control of specific sport activities are pivotal actors and provide a value network for others.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests that SDL and SL approaches to value co-creation are complementary and that further research is necessary to integrate and operationalise these approaches.

Practical implications

It helps practitioners to better understand how value is co-created in sport business-to-business contexts.

Originality/value

This research shows the complementarity of two differing theoretical approaches to explain value co-creation in sport business-to-business settings.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

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Article

Brian Lym, Hal Grossman, Lauren Yannotta and Makram Talih

This paper seeks to address the administration of Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS), the use of SAILS report data, and respondent perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to address the administration of Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS), the use of SAILS report data, and respondent perceptions of the utility of SAILS at institutions that comprise the “All Institutions Benchmark” – the institutions which participated in the SAILS testing through the Spring 2007 testing period.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data for the study. Overall response rate for the survey was 63.9 percent. Disregarding unusable responses, the response rate for the data analysis was 57.8 percent.

Findings

The large majority of institutions used convenience sampling in administering SAILS. With regard to the SAILS report data, there are indications that those institutions that received support for data analysis were more likely to find the results useful; the utility of the SAILS report data can also be correlated with institutional type.

Practical implications

Results from this study suggest that SAILS can be most effective if there is statistical/institutional research support for data analysis, if the sampling method for selecting test takers is more rigorous, if SAILS is used in conjunction with other instruments, and if the SAILS data is correlated with other institutional data.

Originality/value

There have been few published studies on the large‐scale administration of standardized information literacy assessments. Moreover, there has been no other published research study assessing multiple institutions' experience of administering SAILS and using SAILS results. Institutions interested in the use of SAILS and other well‐known standardized information literacy tests will find this paper especially relevant.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article

Xiaoning Shi, Jifeng Guo, Naigang Cui and Rong Huang

The purpose of this paper is to design a solar sail heliocentric transfer orbit which can meet the requirements of control system and capture orbit, and to provide the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to design a solar sail heliocentric transfer orbit which can meet the requirements of control system and capture orbit, and to provide the change of angles for attitude control system.

Design/methodology/approach

Aiming at the problem of solar sail heliocentric transfer orbits design, this paper addresses the derivation of analytical optimal control law. The control laws can realize the combination of the control of each orbit element, but they can only give local optimal solution to meet the practical needs of mission. In order to solve this problem and meet the capture orbit and the attitude control system requirements, the modified genetic algorithm based on the analytical control law is introduced.

Findings

The algorithm addressed by this paper includes results closer to the global optimization, and also can meet the engineering constraints.

Practical implications

The analytical optimal control law can be applied to the future onboard sail control systems. The blending optimal algorithm is demonstrated to be suitable as a method of preliminary design for solar sail deep space exploration mission.

Originality/value

A blending optimal algorithm combining the analytical control law and genetic algorithm is proposed; the algorithm can search for global optimization based on the local optimal results of analytical control law.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 85 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

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Article

Andrew Jones and Caroline Navarro

The Rolex Middlesea sailing event takes place in Malta on an annual basis. The race forms part of a number of new tourism initiatives supported by the Maltese Government…

Abstract

Purpose

The Rolex Middlesea sailing event takes place in Malta on an annual basis. The race forms part of a number of new tourism initiatives supported by the Maltese Government. These aim to diversify the Maltese tourism economy from reliance on mass tourism to more niche or specialist forms based, for example, upon the “Blue Economy”. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impact and future of sailing events using the Rolex Middlesea sailing event as a specific case. In turn it evaluates current and future contributions to both the Maltese tourist economy and broader experiences and lessons of such events for other regional destinations. Consideration is given to the overall impact of the Rolex race for Maltese tourism; how the event can be improved to enhance its contribution to Maltese tourism; and what challenges the event faces in promoting Malta as an “alternative” tourism destination. Conclusions assess the benefits and barriers for developing maritime events and for sailing and yachting sectors as an alternative tourism option for Malta. In turn, it provides a specific and unique case that reviews implications for such events and, at a broader policy context, lessons for developing niche event markets for tourism destinations generally.

Design/methodology/approach

This research focusses upon an inductive approach using qualitative and case study research methodologies. Secondary data for events management, sports tourism sailing and yachting and niche market development provide a contextual framework. Primary research is used to collect qualitative data which are based on purposeful sample selection of interviews from professionals associated with Maltese maritime industries and key stakeholder groups. The data are analysed through discourse analysis techniques utilising grid matrices to evaluate and ascertain common themes and responses that occur from the discussions and questions asked.

Findings

Results point to lessons learnt and future policy directions for the Blue economy and sailing and yachting as drivers for change. Results show that the RMSR can clearly create opportunities for the establishment of new innovative tourism markets. In turn, it is also recognised that this can lead to a stronger sailing and yachting tourism industry not only within Malta but also help regenerate or sustain interest in maritime traditions and stimulate new opportunities for maritime tourism and broader opportunities for the growth of the “blue economy” agenda across the region and further afield.

Research limitations/implications

This single case study can be best described as an “exploratory” study. It deals with how an event is structured, functions and performs particularly within the different inter-organisational partnerships. In this context, the research deals with the case study of a real-life event and therefore its academic value may tend to be rather specific and industry focussed. The empirical value of the enquiry, nonetheless, can provide a platform to draw more general assertions regarding the hosting of sailing and yachting events and consequences more broadly for events management theory and practice.

Practical implications

Evidence from the research also suggests that sailing and yachting has the capability of lending itself to many different areas of investment and new business development opportunities such as overwintering for yachts and corporate business event sponsorships linked to a growing MICE market. The need to engage with local communities at a local level is also recognised as a potential for building recognition and skill capacity. This, in turn, can assist local host communities to familiarise themselves with the discipline of sailing as a life skill simultaneously strengthening and encouraging maritime tradition and opening opportunities for social development, business and employment growth.

Social implications

The RMSR demonstrates that such an event can assist local host communities to familiarise themselves with the discipline of sailing as a life skill simultaneously strengthening and encouraging maritime tradition and opening opportunities for social development, business and employment growth. The growth potential of the RMSR is thus broad and, in many ways, may continue to assist Malta in diversifying its traditional tourism markets, capitalising assets, developing opportunity for its local communities, encouraging business opportunity and assisting in developing a higher quality tourism focus for the Islands.

Originality/value

Detailed and insightful research on sailing and yachting in Malta remains fairly limited and there is little hard evidence to prove the value of such events since there is little available data on differential spending patterns and little cost/benefit analysis undertaken. The RMSR case provide unique research which sets out to explore the role of the RMSR to Malta’s tourism product, identify and evaluate factors for success, evaluate key contemporary issues and challenges in hosting the event, evaluate the future potential of such events for Malta’s tourism economy and draw broader benefits and lessons for hosting events of this nature.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article

Magnus Danbolt and Dominique Fischer

During April-July 2013 the sailing cargo vessel Okeanos conducted a transport research project in Fiji. The vessel sailed regularly between Gau, Suva and Kadavu where…

Abstract

Purpose

During April-July 2013 the sailing cargo vessel Okeanos conducted a transport research project in Fiji. The vessel sailed regularly between Gau, Suva and Kadavu where transport data were collected. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the transport need in the islands and how a smaller, cheap sailing vessel would perform and meet that need and if it can be economically sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

Maritime Safety Authority of Fiji and the Ministry of Public Utilities, Transport and Works, issued a temporary safety certificate and verbally agreed on Okeanos working in a non-commercial capacity for four months. The preparations allowed for 31 days continuous traffic in Kadavu and Lomaiviti area.

Findings

Okeanos carried 22 tons cargo and 55 passengers during 31 days. The trial shows that sailing time affects the running costs and make route planning essential for a sailing vessel. The results indicate that a sailing operation can be economically sustainable for routes that allow at least two return sails a week. To expand the operation to tourist-passengers willing to pay higher fees would be a more sustainable alternative. Simulations in the appendix with fictive values for transporting goods and passengers illustrate the feasibility of various options.

Research limitations/implications

Limited permits and licenses allowed only for a short trial. Permits also prohibited the trial to engage in full commercial capacity.

Originality/value

The study provides a transport trial with measurable outcomes. It can justify further and more extensive trials with alternative transport methods to remote islands and villages.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article

Jiqing Chen, Shaorong Xie, Jun Luo and Hengyu Li

The purpose of this paper was to solve the shortage of carrying energy in probing robot and make full use of wind resources in the Antarctic expedition by designing a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to solve the shortage of carrying energy in probing robot and make full use of wind resources in the Antarctic expedition by designing a four-wheel land-yacht. Land-yacht is a new kind of mobile robot powered by the wind using a sail. The mathematical model and trajectory of the land-yacht are presented in this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The mechanism analysis method and experimental modeling method are used to establish a dual-input and dual-output mathematical model for the motion of land-yacht. First, the land-yacht’s model structure is obtained by using mechanism analysis. Then, the models of steering gear, servomotors and force of wing sail are analyzed and validated. Finally, the motion of land-yacht is simulated according to the mathematical model.

Findings

The mathematical model is used to analyze linear motion and steering motion. Compared with the simulation results and the actual experimental tests, the feasibility and reliability of the proposed land-yacht modeling are verified. It can travel according to the given signal.

Practical implications

This land-yacht can be used in the Antarctic, outer planet or for harsh environment exploration.

Originality/value

A land-yacht is designed, and the contribution of this research is the development of a mathematical model for land-yacht robot. It provides a theoretical basis for analysis of the land-yacht’s motion.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article

Vibha Pinglé

State‐owned enterprises (SOEs), in general, have not been successful. Their indifferent performance has been at the center of the debate about the role of the state in the…

Abstract

State‐owned enterprises (SOEs), in general, have not been successful. Their indifferent performance has been at the center of the debate about the role of the state in the economy. To economists, the performance of SOEs is evidence of what is wrong with state intervention. And in recent years privatization has increasingly been regarded as the only way of improving the performance of SOEs. Yet, while unsuccessful SOEs abound, a few high‐performing SOEs such as POSCO (South Korea), Airbus Industrie (France), EMBRAER (Brazil), and MUL (India) can also be found.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Arthur Brian Ault and Jessame Ferguson

The research project assessed information literacy skill changes in college students at two points in time, as entering first-year students in 2012 and as seniors in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The research project assessed information literacy skill changes in college students at two points in time, as entering first-year students in 2012 and as seniors in their senior seminar capstone courses in the 2015–2016 academic year. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS) individual test was the selected instrument. Version 1 of the test was used for first-year students and Version 2 was used for seniors. All testing was done in person in computer labs with a librarian or library staff member present to proctor the test. This resulted in obtaining 330 student results as first years and 307 as seniors, with 161 exact matches for both administrations of the test. Exact matching of student scores to demographic details pulled from the college’s student information systems were used in the analysis.

Findings

The analysis shows that overall first-year students tested below the 70 percent proficiency benchmark in all eight skill sets, but by the time they were seniors they scored above 70 percent in three skill sets. Male students and students of color performed lower than their counterparts, but these groups did demonstrate significant improvement in four skill sets by the time they were seniors. Students in the Honors program, those who took longer to complete the test as seniors, those with higher GPAs, those in Humanities majors, and those who had upper level course exposures to librarian information literacy instruction had higher performance on the test. There were no statistically significant results for students who were first generation, Pell Grant eligible, or were in-state or out-of-state residents.

Originality/value

There are few published studies that utilized the SAILS test for longitudinal institution-wide assessment. The majority of institutions that utilized the individual version of SAILS did so to determine change within a selected course, or set of courses, in the same semester and very few are published.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

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