Search results

1 – 10 of over 26000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2020

Noura Yassine and Sanjay Kumar Singh

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a supply chain consisting of a producer and multiple suppliers of a type of component needed for the production of a certain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a supply chain consisting of a producer and multiple suppliers of a type of component needed for the production of a certain product. The effects of carbon emission taxes, quality of components and human inspection errors as well as the collaboration among the supply chain members are considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A mathematical model is formulated for a non-collaborative supply chain, and the optimal policy is shown to be the solution of a constraint optimization problem. The mathematical model is modified to the case of a collaborative supply chain and to account for inspection errors. Algorithms are provided, and a numerical example is given to illustrate the determination of the optimal policy.

Findings

This study offers a new conceptual and analytical model that analyzes the production problem from a supply chain perspective. Human resource management practices and environmental aspects were incorporated into the model to reduce risk, optimally select the suppliers and properly maximize profit by accounting for human inspection error as well carbon emission taxes. Algorithms describing the determination of the optimal policy are provided.

Practical implications

This study provides practical results that can be useful to researchers and managers aiming at designing sustainable supply chains that incorporate economic, environmental and human factors.

Originality/value

This study can be useful to researchers and managers aiming for designing sustainable supply chains that incorporate economic and human factors.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Roy K. Smollan and Smita Singh

Purpose: The emotions that accompany failure, in and of organizations, and their consequences have been researched in multiple domains of management, but comparative…

Abstract

Purpose: The emotions that accompany failure, in and of organizations, and their consequences have been researched in multiple domains of management, but comparative approaches have seldom been attempted. The failure of organizations to survive has been a common occurrence over centuries, particularly in the modern era of start-ups, innovation, and political, economic, and environmental turbulence. With the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, failure at many levels of society, including the organizational and individual, has increased significantly and produced even more intense emotions. Study Design/Methodology/Approach: For this conceptual chapter, literature from many disciplines was consulted on failure in organizations, and the emotions it elicit, including studies on the process of failure as well as its outcomes. Findings: Failing and failure are likely to evoke negative emotions, with negative consequences for the actor. However, positive emotions can also occur, and a matrix of emotional valence and consequences presents an intriguing set of possibilities. The dimensions of emotions (valence, intensity, duration, and frequency) interact with a wide range of contributing factors (salience, personality, identity, emotional intelligence, emotional regulation, prior experience of failure, and context) in producing the emotions of failure and their consequences. Originality/Value: This chapter contributes to the literature by explicating the types of emotions that emanate during and after failure across many domains of management research, their dimensions and contributing factors, and the consequences for the individual actor. The model of the emotions of failure that is presented here assembles a wider variety of elements than prior research has offered. We indicate avenues for further research as we approach an era of even more demanding challenges.

Details

Emotions and Negativity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-200-4

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Daniel Rottig, Taco H. Reus and Shlomo Y. Tarba

This chapter aims to make sense of the growing research that examines the role of culture in mergers and acquisitions. We provide a detailed review of the many related but…

Abstract

This chapter aims to make sense of the growing research that examines the role of culture in mergers and acquisitions. We provide a detailed review of the many related but distinct constructs that have been introduced to the literature. While each construct has contributed to our understanding of the role of culture, the lack of connections made among constructs has limited the consolidation of contributions. The review shows what these constructs mean for mergers and acquisitions, what major findings have been discovered, and, most importantly, how constructs interrelate. Our discussion provides several opportunities to foster the needed consolidation of this research.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-836-5

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Nitya Prasad Singh and Shubham Singh

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms can develop business risk resilience from supply chain disruption events, by developing big data analytics (BDA…

Downloads
2304

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms can develop business risk resilience from supply chain disruption events, by developing big data analytics (BDA) capabilities within their organization. The authors test whether BDA mediates the impact of institutional response to supply chain disruption events, and information technology infrastructure capabilities (ITICs), on firm’s ability to develop risk resilience from supply chain disruption events.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on survey data collected from 225 firms, spread across several sectors in the USA and Europe. The respondents are primarily senior and middle management professionals who have experience within the information technology (IT) and supply chain domain. Validity and reliability analyses were performed using SPSS and AMOS; and covariance-based structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesis.

Findings

The analysis reveals two significant findings. First, the authors observe that institutional experience with managing supply chain disruption events has a negative impact on firm’s ability to develop business risk resilience. However, if the organizations adopt BDA capabilities, it enables them to effectively utilize resident firm knowledge and develop supply chain risk resilience capacity. The results further suggest that BDA positively adds to an organization’s existing IT capabilities. The analysis shows that BDA mediates the impact of ITIC on the organization’s ability to develop risk resilience to supply chain disruption events.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few works that empirically validate the important role that BDA capabilities play in enabling firms develop business risk resilience from supply chain disruption events. The study further provides a counterpoint to the existing perspective within the supply chain risk management literature that institutional experience of managing past supply chain disruption events prepares the organization to deal with future disruption events. This paper adds to our understanding of how, by adopting BDA capabilities, firms can develop supply chain risk resilience from disruption events.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Sarah Horrod

Building on the proposition that Bernstein's ideas are due for a revival in higher education research, the call for studies in which theory is put to use and for policy…

Abstract

Building on the proposition that Bernstein's ideas are due for a revival in higher education research, the call for studies in which theory is put to use and for policy studies to engage in textual analysis, this chapter argues for the affordances of the theoretical underpinnings of Bernstein's pedagogic device and critical discourse studies in investigating connections between policy and practice. Drawing on the sociology of pedagogy and applied linguistics, this chapter aims to explore the theoretical complementarities of the chosen approaches for exploring how policy ideas move through time and space. A focus on the notion of recontextualisation enables an understanding of how influences beyond the discipline itself, including policy discourses, can shape learning, teaching and assessment practices. The illustrating case examines policy on learning and teaching and how these ideas are recontextualised from national policy through to institutional policy and individual practices. The critical or questioning angle of both approaches in seeing ideas, including policy, as never value-free but as situated within their sociopolitical context can shed light on how policy ideas make their way into universities and in whose interests.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-321-2

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Ritu Arora, Anubhav Pratap Singh, Renu Sharma and Anand Chauhan

The awareness for protecting the environment has resulted in remanufacturing and recycling policies in manufacturing industries. Carbon emission is one of the most…

Abstract

Purpose

The awareness for protecting the environment has resulted in remanufacturing and recycling policies in manufacturing industries. Carbon emission is one of the most important elements affecting the environment. Carbon emission due to production and transportation creates complicated situations for the manufacturing firms by affecting the manufacturer's carbon quota. The ecological consequences posed in a reverse logistic model are the subject of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study explores the fuzzy model of economic production for both remanufacturing and recycling with uncertain cost parameters under the cap-and-trade rule to control the carbon emission due to different modes of transportation. Due to imprecise cost parameters, the hexagonal fuzzy numbers are set to fuzzify the overall cost, which leads to correct decisions in a more confident way. The result is defuzzified by using graded mean integration.

Findings

This study offers an explicit condition to control the carbon emission of the manufacturer and reduce the optimum cost. The findings indicate that the collection of used goods that can be remanufactured must be increased. The model is validated numerically. Sensitivity analysis explores the various aspects of different parameters on net cost to accomplish the fuzzy production model.

Originality/value

Under fuzzy inference, the research offers a relevant contribution in the field of recycling with controlling carbon emission by using the cap-and-trade policy. This study provides a trading strategy for a manufacturer's decision to avoid losses.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2014

Mia Hsiao-Wen Ho and Pervez N. Ghauri

Learning through international strategic alliances is usually influenced by dispersed locations and cultural difference between the countries of the two firms. This…

Abstract

Learning through international strategic alliances is usually influenced by dispersed locations and cultural difference between the countries of the two firms. This research highlights the importance of contextual factors on learning through international strategic alliances. Based on an empirical study of 271 alliances, our findings reveal that successful alliance learning not only depends on the partner’s openness to share knowledge but also relies on the firm’s capacity to identify and absorb such knowledge. Institutional differences between the countries from where partner firms originate are considered to hinder the alliance learning by decreasing the firm’s absorptive capacity and by enhancing knowledge ambiguity. However, our research suggests that frequent direct communication and high levels of mutual trust and reciprocal commitment between partner firms positively moderate the noxious effects of institutional differences on the alliance learning process.

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2014

Satu Teerikangas and Tomi Laamanen

While there is an increasing understanding of the challenges that can emerge in integration processes of cross-border mergers and acquisitions, there is a scarcity of…

Abstract

While there is an increasing understanding of the challenges that can emerge in integration processes of cross-border mergers and acquisitions, there is a scarcity of research on how the different integrative activities should be temporally sequenced. Based on an in-depth analysis of three acquisitions, we find that structural and cultural integration are intertwined. We find that cultural integration will begin only once structural integration is in progress. Cultural differences can, however, impede structural integration if structural integration is done in conflict with the existing culture of the acquired company. Thus, structural integration should come first, but it should be done in appreciation with the acquired company’s existing culture. Cultural change is then facilitated in an iterative manner over time by the new structure. Our chapter contributes to an improved understanding of the temporal dynamics of integration by demonstrating the mutually reinforcing effects of structural and cultural integration in cross-border acquisitions.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-970-6

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Aliza Luft and Susan Thomson

The social categories “Hutu” and “Tutsi” have long been central to Rwandan politics, though never more so than during the 1994 genocide, when they formed the ultimate…

Abstract

The social categories “Hutu” and “Tutsi” have long been central to Rwandan politics, though never more so than during the 1994 genocide, when they formed the ultimate divide: kill (Hutu) or be killed (Tutsi). Since then, the Rwandan government has sought to eliminate these categories and replace them with a new, national identity category of “Rwandan.” This chapter draws on theories of state symbolic power and legibility to analyze how top-down projects of remaking Rwandans are being received from below. Specifically, we examine ordinary Rwandans' responses to gacaca, a community justice practice central to the state's National Unity and Reconciliation Program, and find Rwandans resent efforts to “unmake race” in favor of “nation” because the state's account of genocide in gacaca does not allow them to sincerely express their experiences; it activates traumatic pasts for what they feel is superficial national reconciliation; and it detracts from their material needs. These findings highlight the importance of distinguishing between compliance and conviction in research on state efforts to transform civilian subjectivities. They also suggest directions for further research. Namely, future research on state symbolic power should attend to how individual experiences with violence mediate top-down efforts at remaking civilian subjectivities, to how different forms of governance shape civilian resistance to state categorization and classification projects, and to what kinds of interests are likely to motivate people to alter their self-perceptions. We conclude by arguing for more work on state race and nation-making from the perspectives of its targets.

Details

Global Historical Sociology of Race and Racism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-219-6

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Mark C. Johlke and Rajesh Iyer

The purpose of this paper is to extend Zablah et al.s (2012) findings regarding the proper way to treat customer orientation (CO) to the study of CO among B-B salespeople…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend Zablah et al.s (2012) findings regarding the proper way to treat customer orientation (CO) to the study of CO among B-B salespeople in one of the most important emerging economies, India.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors of this study hired a professional market research firm based in Chennai, a large metropolitan city in Southern India, to manage data collection. The authors used a competing models approach to test the relationship between constructs.

Findings

CO among frontline employees operating in one of the largest emerging economies is best treated as a psychological construct that is both directly and indirectly related to performance via its ability to reduce stress and improve engagement. This finding strengthens the view of CO as a universal human work value and, more broadly, that such values operating across different cultural setting do exist. In addition, external customer mindset appears to offer a superior means to measure CO than does the widely used CO component of the SOCO scale. This conclusion is based not only upon the fact that it conceptually corresponds with the psychological nature of CO, but also that in this initial examination it exhibits a greater ability to explain employee job performance.

Originality/value

Managers who are able to screen and hire employees with greater CO work values should experience improved performance outcomes and also less customer ambiguity and greater satisfaction among their frontline employees. Since CO proscribes the proper way to deal with customers, greater levels of CO beliefs would counteract customer ambiguity among frontline employees operating in any environment. Accordingly, when filling frontline positions, managers should actively seek out employees who earnestly embrace the role of taking care of customers. Managers are advised to not only emphasize on salespeople whose foremost role is to take care of their customers but also to find ways to familiarize them with their products and to provide them with information regarding customer characteristics such as their background, the relationship history (especially past service and product failures), and unique preferences.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 26000