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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Neeraj Sharma, Rahul Dev Gupta, Rajesh Khanna, Rakesh Chandmal Sharma and Yogesh Kumar Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the optimized setting of wire-cut electrical discharge machining (WEDM) parameters at which material removal rate (MRR) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the optimized setting of wire-cut electrical discharge machining (WEDM) parameters at which material removal rate (MRR) and mean roughness depth (Rz) set a compromise. The problem in the processing of Ti-6Al-4V by conventional processes is a high strength, high hardness, high tool wear. Due to which WEDM is adopted to machine Ti-6Al-4V biomedical alloy. Ti-6Al-4V alloy has a number of applications in the engineering and medical industries due to its high strength biocompatibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The effect of control factors (i.e. pulse on-time: Pon; pulse off-time: Poff; servo voltage: SV) on the MRR and Rz is investigated in the present research. The planning of experiments is done using a Taguchi-based L9 orthogonal array. The percentage influence of each factor on responses is also evaluated. The multi-objective optimization is done using the grey approach initially. After that, the results were also calculated using harmony search (HS). Therefore, a hybrid approach of grey and HS is used to find the optimized values of MRR and Rz.

Findings

The maximum value of grade calculated by grey-HS is 0.7879, while in the case of the experimental run the maximum value of grey grade is 0.7239. The optimized setting after improvisation at this grade value is Pon: 130 µs; Poff: 45 µs and SV: 70 V for MRR and Rz collectively. The validation of the suggested setting is completed by experimentation. The values of MRR and Rz are coming out to be 6.4 mm3/min and 13.84 µm, which represents improvised results after the implementation of the HS algorithm.

Originality/value

The integration of the grey approach with the HS principle in the manufacturing domain is yet to be explored. Therefore, in the present research hybrid approach of grey-HS is implemented in the manufacturing domain having applications in medical industries.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Frank C. Butler and John A. Martin

This chapter explores how stress may manifest among non-family member employees, family member employees, and family firm founders in family firms during the startup…

Abstract

This chapter explores how stress may manifest among non-family member employees, family member employees, and family firm founders in family firms during the startup phases of the organization. Understanding how stress arises in family firm startups has received limited attention to date. Notably absent in the research is the understanding of how stress arises in non-family member employees, which is important to understand as non-family member employees often outnumber family member employees. As stress increases for the non-family member employee due to issues such as role ambiguity and conflict, negative outcomes resultant from this stress may increase the chances of the employee exhibiting withdrawal behaviors. It is suggested these outcomes increase the stress of the family firm entrepreneur and family members by increasing interrole and interpersonal conflicts and negatively impacting decision-making. These effects on the family members may adversely impact the family firm’s chances of performing well, thus decreasing its chances for survival. Recommendations for future research are also made.

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Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-397-8

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Olof Brunninge and Anders Melander

In this chapter, we explore the impact of socioemotional and financial wealth on the resource management of family firms. We use MoDo, a Swedish pulp and paper firm…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the impact of socioemotional and financial wealth on the resource management of family firms. We use MoDo, a Swedish pulp and paper firm, covering three generations of owner-managers from 1873 to 1991, to grasp the shifting emphases on socioemotional and financial wealth in the management of the company. Identifying four strategic issues of decisive importance for the development of MoDo, we analyze the organizational values that guided the management of these issues. We propose that financial and socioemotional wealth stand for two different rationalities that infuse organizational values. The MoDo case illustrates how these rationalities go hand in hand for extended periods of time, safeguarding both financial success and socioemotional endowments. However, in a situation where the rationalities are no longer in line with the development of the industry context, the conflict arising between the two rationalities may have fatal consequences for the firm in question.

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New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Cristina Cruz, Shainaz Firfiray and Luis R. Gomez-Mejia

This chapter takes a socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective to explain the adoption of human resource (HR) practices in family-controlled firms. Previous studies on human…

Abstract

This chapter takes a socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective to explain the adoption of human resource (HR) practices in family-controlled firms. Previous studies on human resource management (HRM) in family firms have focused only on a small range of HR practices and have rarely utilized strong conceptual frameworks. As a result, these studies have overlooked important factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of HRM in these organizations. Based on ample evidence that shows family businesses' preference for non-economically motivated objectives collectively labeled as SEW, we propose that the presence of SEW influences HR practices in family firms.

Consequently, we reexamine existing empirical evidence of the determinants of HRM in family-controlled firms under the SEW approach. We also reinterpret existing theoretical models of family-controlled firms and their implications for HRM under the SEW umbrella. Our final goal is to establish an integrated framework through a set of sound propositions on HRM in family businesses. By integrating the literature, we aim to fill theoretical gaps in our understanding of the determinants of HR practices in the family business context and direct future research in this area.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-554-0

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Abstract

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Application of Big Data and Business Analytics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-884-2

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Book part
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Sandra S. Graça and James M. Barry

This study investigates the antecedents and outcomes of cognitive trust during the expansion phase in buyer–supplier relationships. It takes a global approach and examines…

Abstract

This study investigates the antecedents and outcomes of cognitive trust during the expansion phase in buyer–supplier relationships. It takes a global approach and examines cultural nuances between developed nation and emerging market firms by including participants from the United States, China, and Brazil. The results demonstrate the importance of trust in building social capital and the central role which trust plays in shaping business relationships in all studied cultural contexts. There are similarities and differences across countries. Results support relationship marketing theory by demonstrating the importance of conflict resolution, communication frequency, and social bond in building buyer–supplier relationships in the United States, which in turn increase cooperation between partners. Results also indicate that in China, social bond plays a much greater role in building trust, which in turn increases cooperation only to the extent that it serves as a mechanism to secure committed relationships. In Brazil, results show that conflict resolution is the most important factor in building trust. It also mediates the relationship between communication frequency and trust, as well as drives cooperation positively. Overall, trust is found to influence exchange of confidential communication and increases commitment between partners in all three countries.

Details

New Insights on Trust in Business-to-Business Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-063-4

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Shavneet Sharma, Gurmeet Singh, Stephen Pratt and Jashwini Narayan

This study aims to adopt the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model to assess travel purchase intentions in Fiji and Solomon Islands. The UTAUT…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to adopt the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model to assess travel purchase intentions in Fiji and Solomon Islands. The UTAUT model is extended with the inclusion of trust and attitude. This allows for new relationships to be tested. Both countries are classified as Small Island Developing States (SIDS). These two countries are chosen because they are both exemplars for developing countries in the Pacific, which are often overlooked in the literature. In doing so, the study increases the generalizability of the research instrument and the UTAUT model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a quantitative approach and collects data from Fiji and Solomon Islands residents. The survey instrument comprises two broad sections. The first section contains a standard set of demographic questions, including age, gender, income, and education level. The second section contains the variable items for this study. The snowballing sampling technique was used to collect 620 responses using an online survey. Links to the questionnaire were circulated through the use of social media Facebook. The survey was designed and hosted using an online survey tool (SurveyMonkey).

Findings

The findings of this study show that both perceived trust and attitude have been found significant in both countries. On the other hand, performance expectancy (PE) and effort expectancy (EE) have not been found significant for Fiji and Solomon Islands respectively. This study also finds that PE affects attitude for both countries, however, EE is only significant in the Solomon Islands.

Research limitations/implications

Similar to other studies, this study is also bound by limitations that provide fertile ground for future research. The data in this study was based on convenience sampling. Thus, generalizations of the results need to be done with caution. Future research may be conducted that matches the sample to the population proportions. The definition of online travel purchases is another limitation of this study. A broad definition of an online purchase is considered in this study, which involves hotel reservations, holiday packages, cruises, and airline tickets. Thus, future research can be carried considering distinct purchasing motivations of categories of travel products rather than travel being considered as one category.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide valuable implications for both businesses to formulate and execute strategies to increase customers’ adoption of online travel purchases. The findings show how the differences in characteristics at the country level give rise to differences in customer perceptions and their intention to engage in online travel purchases. In doing so, businesses will be able to exploit the full commercial potential of their travel websites and reduce the administrative and personnel costs associated with traditional purchasing processes.

Originality/value

Insights from this study would be effective in understanding the unique characteristics of countries and their influence on customer behavior. This would enable more effective strategy development to improve customers' adoption of online travel purchases. The study also contributes theoretically by highlighting the importance of contextual factors in influencing the view of theories. It is one of the first studies to investigate the customer's adoption of technology in SIDS. In doing so, this study increases the generalizability of the research instrument and the UTAUT model by testing it in a developing country context where empirical evidence is lacking.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Steven H. Appelbaum and Barbara T. Shapiro

While some women have emerged as leaders within contemporaryorganizations, they occupy one‐third of managerial and professorialpositions in Canada while composing…

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1088

Abstract

While some women have emerged as leaders within contemporary organizations, they occupy one‐third of managerial and professorial positions in Canada while composing approximately one‐half of the workforce. At top managerial levels, they occupy less than 5 per cent of senior positions. Earlier research identified “female deficiencies” as a reason why few women have made it to the top. Other findings have indicated that following a masculine model has both advantages and disadvantages for aspiring women managers. Developmental differences between both sexes has helped to explain some of the problems for leaders and followers. Interactive leadership styles utilized by women have been beneficial in moving both genders towards a solution insofar as this style involves four factors: encouraging participation; sharing power and information; enhancing self‐worth of others and finally, energizing others. The use of an androgynous leadership model has not yielded significant findings but there are common characteristics of successful leaders combining both the masculine and feminine models. Organizations and their top leaders need to expand their definition of effective leadership so that an interactive style can be valued, allowing these organizations to be flexible in surviving within an increasingly competitive and diverse environment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Carlo Salvato, Francesco Chirico and Pramodita Sharma

In this chapter we investigate the role of family-specific factors in facilitating or constraining business exit in family firms. Family business literature seems to have…

Abstract

In this chapter we investigate the role of family-specific factors in facilitating or constraining business exit in family firms. Family business literature seems to have an implicit bias toward continuity and persistence in the founder's business. This is explained by heavy emotional involvement and development of path-dependent core competences over generations. However, several long-lived family firms were able to successfully exit the founder's business. Exit allowed them to free significant strategic resources, which were later reinvested in exploiting novel entrepreneurial opportunities. Our aim is to investigate the process of exit from the founder's business in family firms, to explain both triggers and obstacles to decommitment and de-escalation. We address this issue through the study of the Italian Falck Group's exit from the steel industry in the 1990s, followed by successful startup of a renewable energy business. By carefully triangulating different data sources and different voices within and outside the controlling family, we develop a framework describing family-specific facilitators and inhibitors of business exit, and subsequent startup of a new business. Three types of family-specific factors emerge as relevant in shaping a family firm's likelihood and speed of exit from a failing business: family-related psychological triggers and obstacles to business exit; family-specific components of the structural de-escalation context; family responses to ensuing de-escalation and exit needs. The emerging framework offers a more nuanced interpretation of decommitment activities in family firms, pointing to the differential role family-specific factors may play as facilitators or inhibitors of business exit. We also suggest how these family-specific results may contribute to a deeper understanding of exit in nonfamily firms. Our results also have practical implications for family business entrepreneurial management. Actively managing the different determinants of exit choices that emerged from our study will set the stage for de-escalation from a failing course of action – a dynamic capability all family firms should learn and practice if they intend to transfer their entrepreneurial orientation to next generations.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Yi-Chun Huang, Min-Li Yang and Ying-Jiuan Wong

Little research has been conducted on the internal factors that drive green product (GP) innovation and how family influence affects firm adoption of GP innovation. This…

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1527

Abstract

Purpose

Little research has been conducted on the internal factors that drive green product (GP) innovation and how family influence affects firm adoption of GP innovation. This study aims to apply multiple perspectives to bridge this research gap, adopting the resource-based view (RBV) to examine what and how internal factors affect firm adoption of GP innovation, and using the behavioral theory of family firms to investigate whether family influence fosters or hinders firm adoption of GP innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a multichannel approach and adopted content analysis to collect and evaluate data on listed Taiwanese firms and used cross-sectional regression analysis to examine the effect of internal factors and family influence on firm adoption of GP innovation.

Findings

The results showed that the internal factors of green capabilities, R&D intensity and firm size significantly and positively affected firm adoption of GP innovation separately. Furthermore, the study found that family influence (ownership and control) significantly and negatively affects firm adoption of GP innovation separately.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the academic research of innovation management, green management and family firms in several aspects, but also has some limitations. This study examined only the relationship between a firm’s internal factors and GP innovation. Future research might test the relationship between a firm’s internal factors and adoption of green process innovation. In addition, such research can explore how integrated internal and external factors influence firm adoption of GP innovation.

Practical implications

From the RBV, the internal factors of green capabilities, R&D intensity and firm size that can exert crucial effects on firm engage in firm’s adoption of GP innovation. This study suggests that top managers in family-influenced businesses should maintain appropriate commitment and support for fostering and facilitating firm GP innovation.

Social implications

From the RBV, this study examined how internal factors affect firm adoption of GP innovation. Moreover, based on the behavioral theory of family firms, this study further examined how family influence (ownership and control) affects firm adoption of GP innovation. This paper extended both perspectives to examine green issues.

Originality/value

From the RBV, this study examined how internal factors affect firms’ GP innovation. Moreover, based on institutional theory, this study further examines how a family firm moderates the relationship between a firm’s internal factors and GP innovation. The paper extended both perspectives to probe further the green issues.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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