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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

P.A.D. de Maine, K.D. Bradley and S.M. Jodis

The General Information Management (GIM) system defined in this paper is designed to: (1) be information independent; (2) be logically data independent (it is therefore…

Abstract

The General Information Management (GIM) system defined in this paper is designed to: (1) be information independent; (2) be logically data independent (it is therefore question type independent); (3) honor requests for information in small and bounded search times; (4) provide a security system that is foolproof, virus proof and easy to use; (5) be economical and efficient in the use of memory and data communication systems; and (6) be modular in design to function in distributed or standalone environments. The basis of the GIM system is a context free language or data structure, called JOBLIST, and a simulated communications network, called SOLID. Queries, converted to JOBLIST, directly describe the information paths in SOLID that terminate with the location(s) of the referenced information. There is no directory. A proof‐of‐principle prototype has established that the JOBLIST/SOLID system fully meets the above specifications.

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Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Abstract

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Joshua Spier

This chapter engages Heidegger’s notion of caring-for-others to consider what it means to care authentically for young students who are struggling to engage in their…

Abstract

This chapter engages Heidegger’s notion of caring-for-others to consider what it means to care authentically for young students who are struggling to engage in their professional education. While care is commonly understood as an emotive or cognitive state, from Heidegger’s perspective, caring for students is expressed in human action. In “Being and Time”, Heidegger examines how humans care for one another in variable ways in the course of everyday life and distinguishes between “inauthentic” and “authentic” modes of caring. The author critically builds upon Heidegger’s underdeveloped analysis, which articulates a binary between “leaping in” for others (inauthentic modes), and “leaping ahead” of others (authentic modes). From within this conceptual binary, the author argues that authentic care could be mistaken for the educator’s capacity to somehow always care for students in leaping ahead modes, and that such a view leaves little room for the possibility of pedagogic situations that sometimes call educators to leap in for students. Drawing on an Australian youth work lecturer’s story about her experience caring for a student, the author shows how any authentic caring on the educators’ part is predicated on students leaping ahead of themselves, toward their own futural selves as caring professionals in the world.

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Strategies for Facilitating Inclusive Campuses in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-065-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Benjamin Thomas Greer, Grace Cotulla and Halleh Seddighzadeh

Protecting society from sex offenders has presented a challenge for state legislatures. Recent decades have seen a significant increase in sexually motivated crimes…

Abstract

Purpose

Protecting society from sex offenders has presented a challenge for state legislatures. Recent decades have seen a significant increase in sexually motivated crimes, especially sex trafficking. Effectively combatting sexual exploitation demands a range of legal strategies. As of 2012, 20 states have passed sexually violent predators (SVP) legislation. Human traffickers may exhibit the same deplorable characteristics as SVPs and should be subject to civil commitments. Traffickers are extremely skilled at exploiting their victim’s psychological pressure-points; knowing which cultural or personal experiences they can prey upon to extract compliance. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the overlapping predatory nature of sex traffickers and SVPs; the creation and purpose of sexual predator civil commitment statutes; and to dissect two cases which could give grounds for civil commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Legal research and analysis.

Findings

Repeated human sex traffickers may suffer from an underlying mental illness which would render them a continued danger to society when released from jail. They should be evaluated and civility committed if medically appropriate.

Practical implications

A potential increase in civil commits.

Social implications

Keep society safe from repeat sexual predators.

Originality/value

The authors have vast experience in the field of human trafficking and this topic will be a pioneering initial discussion.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2017

Melissa Schieble and Jody Polleck

English teacher candidates have limited opportunities to examine classroom-based discussions about LGBTQ-themed texts and heteronormativity in teacher education courses…

Abstract

English teacher candidates have limited opportunities to examine classroom-based discussions about LGBTQ-themed texts and heteronormativity in teacher education courses. This chapter presents one effort to address this issue using a video-based field experience in the English Methods course that demonstrated a critical unit of instruction about the play, Angels in America. The chapter provides a description of the project and English teacher candidates’ perspectives about what they learned for English educators interested in devising similar projects for their courses.

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Innovations in English Language Arts Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-050-9

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Case study
Publication date: 27 February 2018

John L. Ward and Carol Zsolnay

In mid-2012, after successful years in large public companies and obtaining an MBA, middle daughter Jen, 32, is trying to decide whether the time is right for her to enter…

Abstract

In mid-2012, after successful years in large public companies and obtaining an MBA, middle daughter Jen, 32, is trying to decide whether the time is right for her to enter her mother and sister's small family business to grow it further. Destira, Inc. was a designer/manufacturer of gymnastics wear for girls, headquartered in California. Donna Levy founded the company in 1990, after years of making leotards for her three daughters, who were competitive youth gymnasts, and getting requests from other parents to make the garments for their own children. In 2005, when Donna's oldest daughter, Jodi, joined Destira, Donna gave her a 50 percent equity stake. Between then and year-end 2011, the pair grew the revenues from $550,000 to $1.06 million, increased the number of outlets carrying the brand, upgraded the internal accounting/operations software, and added an online direct-to-customer retail business. The case shows realistic considerations for the individual, family, and business when evaluating whether or not to commit to join the family enterprise.

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Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Joanna Minkiewicz, Kerrie Bridson and Jody Evans

The increased involvement of customers in their experience is a reality for all service organisations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the way organisations…

Abstract

Purpose

The increased involvement of customers in their experience is a reality for all service organisations. The purpose of this paper is to explore the way organisations collaborate with customers to facilitate consumption of cultural experiences through the lens of co-production. Although organisations are typically an integral part of the co-production process, co-production is typically considered from a consumer angle. Aligned with the service ecosystem perspective and value-in-cultural context, this research aims to provide greater insight into the processes and resources that institutions apply to co-produce experiences with consumers and the drivers and inhibitors of such processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study research with three exemplar organisations, using in-depth interviews with key informants was used to investigate the processes organisations follow in co-producing the service experience with customers, as well as the drivers and inhibitors of organisational co-production of the service experience in the cultural sector.

Findings

The findings illuminate that cultural organisations are co-producing the service experience with their customers, as revealed through a number of key processes: inviting customers to actively participate in the experience, engaging customers and supporting customers in the co-production of the experience. Increasingly demanding consumers and a changing competitive landscape are strong external drivers of co-production. Visionary leadership and consumer-focussed employees are internal factors impelling organisations to co-produce experiences with consumers. A strong curatorial orientation, complex organisational structure, employee attitude and capability gaps and funding constraints are impediments towards organisations co-producing experiences with consumers.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in Service-Dominant logic theory, arts/cultural marketing and broader services marketing literature by proposing a broadened conceptualisation of co-production of the service experience. This conceptualisation can be used as a platform to derive strategic imperatives for managers of service organisations. The findings highlight the key practices and resources that are central to organisations co-producing experience with customers. In this way, greater understanding of institutional logics and practices that underpin experience co-production emerges.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Marcus Weisen

The Jodi Awards exist to promote digital access to culture. This paper aims to give some background to the Awards and to profile the 2011 winner and commendation.

Abstract

Purpose

The Jodi Awards exist to promote digital access to culture. This paper aims to give some background to the Awards and to profile the 2011 winner and commendation.

Design/methodology/approach

The Jodi Awards are annual awards given to celebrate the best examples of using technology to make culture and cultural institutions accessible to people with a disability.

Findings

Much has already been achieved in using technology to widen access to museums, galleries and heritage venues but there is clear potential for more development, given the appropriate political will and policy change.

Originality/value

The Jodi Awards are unique in celebrating the use of technology in this way.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Jacquelynn S. Popp, Josh Montgomery, Jodi Hoard and Cynthia Brock

The purpose of this paper is to empower teachers to engage in a process of curricular transformation to integrate a social justice framework, even if it means starting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empower teachers to engage in a process of curricular transformation to integrate a social justice framework, even if it means starting with small steps.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a set of guiding principles on which social studies teachers can draw to transform their curriculum to embody a social justice framework within and across units of historical inquiry. The principles are anchored in an example historical unit, the Chicago Haymarket Affair of 1886, and an analogous contemporary sub-unit, The Exonerated Five (formerly The Central Park Five incident of 1989).

Findings

The guiding principles represent an accessible approach educators can flexibly apply to their process of curricular transformation. The authors provide a balanced approach of emphasizing the need for educators to restructure social studies curriculum with the feasibility of this process at larger or smaller scales according to educators' readiness for change.

Originality/value

The authors outline a process to empower teachers to change the status quo of their social studies teaching, at a scale determined by the teacher. The authors provide a practical, concrete set of guiding principles for educators to make changes that represent social justice integration aligned with existing social studies curriculum and standards. The authors encourage teachers to reflect on their readiness for and progress toward transforming their curriculum to integrate a social justice framework.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Nicolas de Guzman Chorny, Amy Raub, Alison Earle and Jody Heymann

Nearly every country has committed to protect children from work that could be harmful or interfere with their education by ratifying the International Labour Organization…

Abstract

Purpose

Nearly every country has committed to protect children from work that could be harmful or interfere with their education by ratifying the International Labour Organization Minimum Age Convention (C138). Yet there is little transparency and accountability around whether countries have followed through on these commitments by passing legislation to protect children from work. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on analyses conducted of child labor legislation from all 193 United Nations member states to determine whether countries that have committed to ending child labor have taken the first step by passing legislation to protect children and youth from: work that is likely to be hazardous, work that is likely to interfere with their education and work that is harmful to their healthy development.

Findings

Findings show one in five ratifiers legally allow children to do hazardous work, and a similar number permit admission to employment at a young age. Moreover, legislative loopholes significantly undermine the protections that do exist in many countries.

Originality/value

Existing reporting mechanisms sometimes obscure whether central legal protections are in place, make cross-country comparisons difficult and impede the analysis of possible relationships between policies and outcomes across countries. This paper illustrates a novel approach to provide transparency and accountability on whether countries are meeting child labor commitments by using quantitative, globally comparable policy indicators.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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