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Publication date: 22 November 2019

Siri Suh

To explore the politics of gender, health, medicine, and citizenship in high-income countries, medical sociologists have focused primarily on the practice of legal…

Abstract

To explore the politics of gender, health, medicine, and citizenship in high-income countries, medical sociologists have focused primarily on the practice of legal abortion. In middle- and low-income countries with restrictive abortion laws, however, medical sociologists must examine what happens when women have already experienced spontaneous or induced abortion. Post-abortion care (PAC), a global reproductive health intervention that treats complications of abortion and has been implemented in nearly 50 countries worldwide, offers important theoretical insights into transnational politics of abortion and reproduction in countries with restrictive abortion laws. In this chapter, I draw on my ethnography of Senegal’s PAC program to examine the professional, clinical, and technological politics and practices of obstetric care for abortions that have already occurred. I use the sociological concepts of professional boundary work and boundary objects to demonstrate how Senegalese health professionals have established the political and clinical legitimacy of PAC. I demonstrate the professional precariousness of practicing PAC for physicians, midwives, and nurses. I show how the dual capacity of PAC technologies to terminate pregnancy and treat abortion complications has limited their circulation within the health system, thereby reducing quality of care. Given the contradictory and complex global landscape of twenty-first-century abortion governance, in which pharmaceutical forms of abortion such as Misoprostol are increasingly available in developing countries, and as abortion restrictions are increasingly enforced across the developed world, PAC offers important theoretical opportunities to advance medical sociology research on abortion politics and practices in the global North and South.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Abiodun O. Bankole and Gbadebo O. Odularu

The Millennium Development Coals (MDGs) are a potentially powerful tool for economic development. There is the growing awareness about the economic importance of tourism…

Abstract

The Millennium Development Coals (MDGs) are a potentially powerful tool for economic development. There is the growing awareness about the economic importance of tourism in Nigeria. Though the industry is fraught with certain challenges, which are seemingly insurmountable, it has a crucial role to play in helping Nigeria to achieve the 2015 anti‐poverty MDGs. This paper discusses some of the potential benefits of the tourism industry in Nigeria as well as an overview of the industry. Furthermore, it states the MDGs and its limitations. Furthermore it will discuss some of the problems that could impede the growth of the tourism sector. As Nigeria is becoming keenly aware of the substantial development potentials of tourism, this paper presents some recommendations to be considered in order to reap these potentials and facilitate the process of achieving the MDGs.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 61 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Isiaka Akande Raifu

Researchers have long been interested in testing the validity of Okun’s law due to its macroeconomic policy implications. However, most of the studies have focused on…

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Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have long been interested in testing the validity of Okun’s law due to its macroeconomic policy implications. However, most of the studies have focused on testing the law using aggregate data on unemployment and output. In recent times, attention has been shifted to testing the law at the sectoral level. In light of this, the purpose of this study is to examine the response of unemployment to sectoral outputs in Nigeria using the data that covers a period from 1981-2020.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the validity of Okun’s law at the sectoral level, both difference and gap methods of specifying Okun’s law are used. Furthermore, the author also uses a series of estimation methods, which include ordinary least squares (OLS), dynamic OLS (DOLS), fully modified OLS (FMOLS) and canonical cointegration regression (CCR).

Findings

The results, based on the difference model, are mixed irrespective of estimation and data filter methods. For the gap model, Okun’s law holds for all sectors irrespective of estimation techniques (especially DOLS, FMOLS and CCR) when the Hodrick–Prescott filter method is used to filter data. However, the author discovers that the coefficients of Okun’s law vary across the sectors as the response of unemployment to services sector output is greater than the rest of the sectors. When the Hamilton filter method is used to filter data, the results appear to be mixed across the sectors. The results are almost ditto when all the sectoral variables are put in one model.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the validity of sectoral Okun’s law in Nigeria, the leading economy in Africa.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

S.A. Bankole and D.A. Eseigbe

Samples of dry‐roasted groundnuts purchased from street hawkers, markets and retail shops in southwestern Nigeria were analysed for moisture content, fungal populations…

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Abstract

Samples of dry‐roasted groundnuts purchased from street hawkers, markets and retail shops in southwestern Nigeria were analysed for moisture content, fungal populations and aflatoxin contamination. The moisture content varied from 2.1 to 3.6 per cent, while the mould counts using the dilution plating method ranged from 2.9 × 102 to 6.3 × 102 colony‐forming units per gram in samples. Aflatoxin B1 was found in 64.2 per cent of samples with a mean of 25.5 ppb. Aflatoxins B2, G1 and G2 were detected in 26.4, 11.3 and 2.8 per cent of the samples with mean levels of 10.7, 7.2 and 8 ppb respectively in contaminated samples. It is concluded that the regular consumption of DRG by Nigerians might present potential health hazards.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Abiodun S. Bankole, Musibau Adetunji Babatunde and Abdlhakeem A. Kilishi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of consumers preferences on textile materials and the impact of consumer preference on performance of textile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of consumers preferences on textile materials and the impact of consumer preference on performance of textile industry. This is because as consumers have access to a variety of textile products, they strongly developed and shifted preference to foreign sources, which could lead to the eventual demise of many of the textile factories.

Design/methodology/approach

The logit model is adopted to describe the behaviour of consumers when faced with a variety of mutually exclusive choices. The model also describes the consumers’ choice of differentiated goods with common consumption objectives but with different characteristics.

Findings

Findings revealed that consumers in Nigeria prefer foreign textile to locally made textile. In addition, differences in quality and availability are factors that drive consumer’s preference towards foreign textile. Also, the inefficient performance of the Nigerian textile industry is influenced by limited demand from the domestic market, poor infrastructure and smuggling. Hence, there is a need for innovative entrepreneurship, concentration on quality improvement and alleviating supply constraints.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that examines consumer preferences in the Nigerian textile industry.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Collins Osei, Maktoba Omar and Tasneem Suliman Joosub

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role colonial ties play in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) to Ghana, several years after the official end of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role colonial ties play in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) to Ghana, several years after the official end of colonisation in the African continent. Colonisation left behind legacies of institutional framework, social ties and remnants of companies of colonial masters, which could potentially offer contemporary businesses from home countries the benefits of country of origin agglomeration.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses sequential explanatory mixed research design through 101 questionnaires and 8 interviews from the UK companies with FDI in Ghana. This approached enabled the initial quantitative results to be explored further through the qualitative data.

Findings

Colonial ties have limited influence on contemporary flow of FDI to Ghana, in spite of the institutional legacies between former colonisers and colonies. Majority of UK companies are influenced by agglomeration opportunities in general rather than country of origin agglomeration. However, country of origin agglomeration remains important to over a third of the companies surveyed.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was taken from the non-extractive industry in Ghana, and caution must be applied in generalising the findings. However, some universal issues concerning agglomeration and institutions are discussed.

Originality/value

Although there has been some research on colonial history and its impact on FDI in Africa, existing knowledge on bilateral relations is rather limited. Unlike previous studies, this research provides depth by examining colonial influence on FDI between two countries, using two key concepts: country of origin agglomeration and institutions. It provides UK companies with contemporary views to consider when exploring FDI opportunities in Ghana, particularly in relation to the effects of the colonial history. It also provides investment promotion agencies with empirical results on the importance of various forms of agglomeration and institutions for FDI attraction.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Abiodun S. Bankole, Olanrewaju Olaniyan, M. Adetunji Babatunde and Rifkatu Nghargbu

The purpose of this paper is to estimate Nigeria's audiovisual services import demand using foreign football transmitted through digital satellite television (DSTV) as a

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate Nigeria's audiovisual services import demand using foreign football transmitted through digital satellite television (DSTV) as a case study. The major focus is on whether such imports effectively replace local recreation in watching domestic football.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined descriptive statistics. The methodology employed is a combination of descriptive analysis and cross‐sectional regression.

Findings

The paper's analytical framework establishes a link between the conventional import demand and demand for football functions, while the estimated empirical counterpart found that the demand for foreign football via cross‐border satellite transmission is a statistically significant function of taste for foreign football, quality, and entertainment. While descriptive statistics indicate respondents’ preference for foreign football, the test of significance rejected the hypothesis that the demand for foreign football broadcast service imports has replaced demand for domestic football as an entertaining sport. In addition, the demand for foreign football broadcast is fairly inelastic, as a greater percentage of the respondents will watch foreign football even if the cost of subscription or cost of paying per view in the viewing centers increase.

Originality/value

The paper describes the first of this type of research to be conducted in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Abiodun S. Bankole and Adeolu O. Adewuyi

Given the inconclusive evidence in the literature on the impact of Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) flows, as well as dearth of…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the inconclusive evidence in the literature on the impact of Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) flows, as well as dearth of literature on this subject matter as regards West Africa and the European Union (EU), the purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which BITs and preferential trade and investment agreements (PTIAs) triggered foreign investment flows particularly between the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) countries and the EU.

Design/methodology/approach

Trend analysis was used to trace the link between FDI and BITs, while panel regression models were used to investigate the impact of BITs on FDI during 1980‐2010.

Findings

Econometric results indicate that, as in most previous studies, BITs have strong positive impact on FDI in West Africa, with this impact significant at a higher level (1 per cent) for FDI flow than stock (5 per cent). The impact of BITs on FDI is significant even with the state of internal factors (such as capital account liberalisation, trade openness, high inflation rate and poor governance) in West African countries. The findings suggest that in the absence of BITs, West African countries would have suffered adversely from poor FDI inflows given their poor macroeconomic stability and governance. On the contrary, the PTIAs did not have significant impact on both FDI flows and stock. The results also show that FDI inflow to West Africa is both market and resources seeking.

Research limitations/implications

Sensitivity analysis may not have been sufficient. For instance, not tested was the impact of the signalling effect of BIT, as well as other vertical FDI such as those from the USA.

Practical implications

The implication of the findings is that West Africa countries need to design policies and programmes that will enable them to maximise the technological spill‐over from FDI in order not to be perpetual suppliers of primary products and purchasers of manufactured goods. Further, they have to maintain macroeconomic stability and good governance. They need to understand the type of provisions in the BITs that constituent states signed and compare with the provisions of the PTIAs, with a view to discerning what is responsible for the superior response of FDI to BITs.

Originality/value

Given the absence of literature on the impact of BITs on FDI flows between West Africa and EU, it becomes imperative to investigate this issue with a view to motivating the investment component of the EPA, as investment is one of the Singapore issues that were removed from WTO's Doha Round.

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Ayman M. El-Anany, Sami A. Althwab, Rehab F.M. Ali, Rehab F.M. Ali and Hassan Mousa

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of the addition of dried lemongrass leaves (DLGL) powder, at different levels, on phenolics content, antioxidant…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of the addition of dried lemongrass leaves (DLGL) powder, at different levels, on phenolics content, antioxidant activities, consumer acceptance and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation of roasted coffee (RC).

Design/methodology/approach

DLGL powder was incorporated at the levels of 0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10% of RC weight. The total flavonoids (TF), total phenolics (TP) and antioxidant activity measured using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and reducing power assay of RC, DLGL and binary mixture of them determined. The oxidative indices of coffee oil samples during storage were investigated. In addition, the sensory characteristics of RC fortified with different levels of DLGL powder were evaluated.

Findings

The TP content of DLGL powder was 1,100.32 mg/100 g DWb, nearly 1.2 times higher than found in RC beans. The TF content of RC enriched with 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10% DLGL were found to be around 1.05, 1.10, 1.15 and 1.20 times higher than that in the control coffee samples. RC supplemented with various levels of DLGL powder showed higher DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power activities. At the end of the storage period (six months), the acid, peroxide, P-Anisidine and total oxidation value values of RC supplemented with 10% DLGL powder were about 1.94, 2.52, 2.60 and 2.59 times as low as in the control sample without any addition of DLGL powder, respectively. RC containing 2.5% and 5.0% DLGL powder had significantly (p < 0.05) the highest sensory scores. Consequently, the addition of DLGL in coffee at up to a 5% ratio may have potential health benefits.

Practical implications

RC containing 2.5% and 5.0% DLGL powder had significantly (p = 0.05) the highest sensory scores.

Originality/value

Consequently, the addition of DLGL in coffee at up to a 5% ratio may have potential health benefits.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Joseph Nnanna

The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of China’s trade agreement and foreign direct investment (FDI) flows to Nigeria with special reference to the manufacturing…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of China’s trade agreement and foreign direct investment (FDI) flows to Nigeria with special reference to the manufacturing sector utilizing the following key economic performance indicators: inflation, unemployment, income and gross domestic product, to name a few. Since the turn of the millennium, China has enjoyed a substantial presence in the African continent. In fact, the country has signed bilateral agreements with Angola, South Africa and Sudan to name a few. Recently, China established its West African trade hub in Lagos, the economic capital of Nigeria, to be strategically positioned. The results of the study revealed conclusively that although China’s investments over the years have benefited the Nigerian economy and its various firms in the manufacturing sector, the agreement signed by both countries ultimately needs to be reexamined to ensure equity.

Design/methodology/approach

To thoroughly analyze the effects of China’s investments in Nigeria, this study was carried out in two phases. The first analysis of this study is anchored on a “before/after” framework based on descriptive statistical analysis of the selected economic performance indicators chosen from selected cross-national data. Accordingly, the time frame for this study runs from 1993-2012 which roughly corresponds to the era when China commenced significant investments in Nigeria. Second, employees, policymakers and individuals in the manufacturing/textile industries were interviewed. Furthermore, participation from federal as well as local government agency staff members was solicited using the Delphi technique.

Findings

Empirically, the results conclusively reveal China’s dominance in the manufacturing and textile sectors in Nigeria. In other words, at face value, China’s investments are ultimately good for the Nigerian economy. However, at a micro-level analysis, the researcher examined the human factor, that is, the families of former and current employees, abandoned businesses/factories and a decaying textile industry that was once vibrant.

Originality/value

To the knowledge of the researcher, this is the first study attempting to assess the impact of the rise of China on the Nigerian economy by combining key economic performance indicator in tandem with face-to-face interviews and the Delphi technique.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

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