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Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship; Social entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

Graduate level.

Case overview

This paper, The Brownies & Downies case study, aims to examine a social enterprise that provides employment, training and job placements for people with intellectual disability within a trendy artisanal coffee shop in Cape Town, South Africa. The business is based on a similar establishment (same name) in The Netherlands and was brought to Cape Town by Wendy Vermeulen, a Dutch national who completed a social development internship in Cape Town. The case is located within the field of social enterprise with a particular focus on the tension between purpose and profit and the pressure and challenges of replication, growth and scale/expansion. The protagonist in the case is Wade Schultz, Wendy’s business partner, who is grappling with how to not only remain true to the social purpose of the business but also turn a profit in the pressured and competitive coffee industry. He is further challenged by deciding whether to expand the existing training business into other sectors or seek a replication model in other South African cities as a means of growing revenue and increasing the social impact.

Expected learning outcomes

The key learning from this case study are as follows: First, intellectual disability is a hidden form of disability, often misunderstood and subject to prejudice and discriminatory hiring practices. Intellectual disability exists on a scale – some individuals are able to work outside of pretexted or sheltered workspaces. Greater effort is required within open workplaces to sensitive staff to working with/alongside intellectually disabled people. This case illustrates a social enterprise model that seeks to bridge the gap between sheltered workspaces and open workspaces. Second, most social enterprises grapple with the tension between profit and purpose; this case presents a company that is living this dilemma. The importance of remaining true to purpose needs to be balanced carefully against becoming economically self-sufficient; however, the pursuit of profits should not happen at the cost of social mission. Alternate business models are a mechanism to building revenue to support the social objective.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2006

Robert A. Kahn

The Supreme Court's recent cross burning case – Virginia v. Black (2003) – saw dueling historical narratives. Justice O’Connor, writing for the majority, painted a history…

Abstract

The Supreme Court's recent cross burning case – Virginia v. Black (2003) – saw dueling historical narratives. Justice O’Connor, writing for the majority, painted a history in which the Klan often burned crosses to intimidate, but also did so for other, “expressive” reasons. Justice Thomas, in dissent, related a history in which the burning cross never speaks. Interestingly, O’Connor and Thomas used many of the same historical sources. How did they reach such different results? While both O’Connor and Thomas interpreted (and stretched) the historical sources in different directions, their dispute ultimately turned on their diverging doctrinal views.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-323-5

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

John Werkhoven

An increased understanding of the capabilities needed for HR Analytics and how to build synergies from these capabilities is of practical and academic importance. Using…

Abstract

An increased understanding of the capabilities needed for HR Analytics and how to build synergies from these capabilities is of practical and academic importance. Using the lens of Systems Theory, an explorative case study is performed in a multinational food distribution company that is building its HR Analytics Capabilities. In this study, the synergistic enablers and mechanisms have been examined in practice for the domain of HR Analytics and the BA Capabilities involved (clustered into Technology, Governance, Analytic Practices and Processes, People and Culture). Examples of (in)compatibilities, integration efforts, mechanisms and synergistic outcomes are given from the case organization. This study provides insights on how in practice the interaction between BA Capabilities can lead to synergistic relationships and synergistic outcomes and through what mechanisms and enablers this is being facilitated. The study contributes to HR Analytics and IS literature in terms of the use of synergistic enablers and mechanisms in practice.

Details

HRM 4.0 For Human-Centered Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-535-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Damith T. Woods, Cathy Catroppa, Celia Godfrey, Rebecca Giallo, Jan Matthews and Vicki A. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to determine the preliminary clinical utility of a telephone-support format of the “Signposts” (Hudson et al., 2003) behavioural intervention…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the preliminary clinical utility of a telephone-support format of the “Signposts” (Hudson et al., 2003) behavioural intervention programme to be used with a paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) population.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine families caring for a child with moderate or severe TBI, participated in a pilot study of a TBI adapted “Signposts for Building Better Behaviour” manualised programme. The programme is designed to help parents learn positive parenting skills and strategies that empower them to successfully manage their child's challenging behaviour post-TBI. The programme consists of seven core sessions and two supplemental sessions. Parents work through the sessions with an accompaniment of guiding information booklets, a DVD with scenes modelling positive parenting strategies, and a workbook containing written exercises. At the completion of each session parents receive a telephone-support call from a trained Signposts practitioner who provides assistance and feedback on programme content.

Findings

On average parents completed eight sessions (range seven to nine) and every family completed the seven core sessions. Participation in the telephone-support calls was high with 96 per cent of calls having been successfully received by families. All parents agreed that the telephone calls were a useful part of the programme and felt that the materials were helpful for managing challenging behaviour. Paired-samples t-tests showed significant reductions for challenging behaviour from pre- to post-intervention. Parenting practices also significantly improved over the course of the intervention. In general, parents rated a high level of consumer satisfaction with the Signposts programme and its content.

Originality/value

Overall, these preliminary findings support the potential clinical utility of a telephone-support version of the Signposts programme to improve parenting skills and to reduce challenging child behaviour following TBI. This study has provided the impetus for a larger clinical research trial to be conducted.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 1 September 2016

The new body is part of President Macky Sall's agenda of constitutional reforms ahead of parliamentary elections in 2017 and the presidential vote in 2019.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB213316

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Asmare Emerie Kassahun and Alemayehu Molla

The purpose of this paper is to define the skills, systems, and technologies developed post‐business process reengineering (BPR), which the authors refer to as BPR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define the skills, systems, and technologies developed post‐business process reengineering (BPR), which the authors refer to as BPR Complementary Competences (BPRCC), and develop and validate a model to evaluate the BPRCC of public sector organizations in developing economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper, drawing from the complementary competence perspective of the resource‐based view, defines the BPRCC as a higher order construct composed of the BPR complementary transformational competences (BPRCTC) and managerial competences (BPRCMC). Based on Lewis et al.'s methodology of instrument development, an instrument is developed using survey data of 209 public sector organizations.

Findings

The finding produces a 13 item measurement model. Further, it shows that the BPRCTC is composed of three competencies, namely, BPR‐IS alignment, continuous process improvement and integration and information system delivery competences.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers can use the model and instrument as part of a nomological‐net of factors to explain the impact of BPR on public sector organizational performance. BPR practitioners can also use the instrument to identify and nurture those competences that are critical to enhance BPR's value.

Originality/value

The development of the BPRCC model and its accompanying measurement instrument for the public sector context of a developing economy represents an original contribution.

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 11 November 2020

The changes follow recent public criticism over Sall’s poor response to flooding that caused significant damage in many areas, including the capital Dakar, coupled with…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB257472

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Neil F. Doherty and Mark Terry

In this paper, the authors seek to draw upon resource‐based theory to explore the role of existing, complementary organisational resources, in leveraging sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors seek to draw upon resource‐based theory to explore the role of existing, complementary organisational resources, in leveraging sustainable improvements in competitive positioning, resulting from information systems initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model has been derived from the literature, which is then used to guide the conduct of a major, integrated quantitative and qualitative survey of managers.

Findings

In this paper, it is shown that improvements in competitive positioning are likely to be more significant and sustainable when a new IS initiative makes an indirect contribution, through the leveraging of complementary organisational resources, rather than stemming directly from the functionality of the IT asset.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this study relate to its use of a “convenience” sample and a “single‐informant”. However, both these comprises were viewed as being worthwhile, as it gave the authors the opportunity to conduct a study that was both broad and deep, in terms of the data collected.

Practical implications

The authors draw out the implications of their empirical study for the management of IT projects, to improve their ability to deliver sustainable improvements in competitive positioning.

Originality/value

This research makes a significant departure from the aggregated, enterprise‐level orientation of prior studies, by focusing upon the process‐level impacts of individual IS initiatives.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 113 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

David E. Williams, Elly-Jean Nielsen, Melanie A. Morrison and Todd G. Morrison

This study aims to explore the perceptions and reactions of men, who participate in a female-dominated online consumption space. It looked at the process of men…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions and reactions of men, who participate in a female-dominated online consumption space. It looked at the process of men, (re)negotiating their digital gendered identity on Pinterest.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory-light approach was taken. Data were collected through 21 one-on-one semi-structured interviews with male Pinterest users. Subsequently, data were extensively coded and analyzed for the key themes and patterns.

Findings

Three core categories emerged, which speak to the ways men account for their practices on Pinterest as autonomous online agents. These categories were: awareness of Pinterest as a feminized digital space; limited sociality due to the solitary use of Pinterest (the exception being when collaborating with an intimate partner); and performed identities (k = 4) serving to justify the men’s activities on a female-dominated social networking site.

Research limitations/implications

The findings establish a firm theoretical basis for understanding male Pinterest users as autonomous online agents. However, reflective of this relatively small, exploratory qualitative project, the process-based interview questions did not render, particularly, long or rich narratives. Future qualitative research might endeavor to ask deeper, more open-ended questions.

Originality/value

This is an original study of men’s use of Pinterest. Research on the identity projects of men entering fields traditionally occupied by women and coded as feminine is established, there is a lack of understanding of how gender identity is (re)constructed digitally, especially on social media.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

JoyAnn Andrews, Jill Manthorpe and Roger Watson

Intermediate care is emerging as performing an increasingly‐significant function in bridging the care gap between hospital and home. It does not emerge from a policy or…

Abstract

Intermediate care is emerging as performing an increasingly‐significant function in bridging the care gap between hospital and home. It does not emerge from a policy or service vacuum. Relationships between statutory health and social care services and the voluntary sector have their roots in past practices and separate agendas. The findings from this study indicate that any partnership between the statutory and voluntary sectors in delivering packages of intermediate care will inevitably encounter challenges associated with multi‐level, multi‐professional and multi‐agency collaboration. This article explores these challenges and provides some insight on how to meet them.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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