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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

R. Venkatesakumar, Sudhakar Vijayakumar, S. Riasudeen, S. Madhavan and B. Rajeswari

The star rating summarises the review content and conveys the message faster than other review components. Star ratings influence helpfulness of the reviews, and extreme…

Abstract

Purpose

The star rating summarises the review content and conveys the message faster than other review components. Star ratings influence helpfulness of the reviews, and extreme reviews are considered as less helpful in the decision process. However, literature has rarely addressed variations in star ratings across product categories and variations between two online retailers. In this paper, the authors have compared the distribution of star ratings across 11 products and among the retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

Online reviews for 11 product categories have collected, and the authors compared the distribution of star ratings across 11 products and retailers. Correspondence analysis has been applied to show the association between star ratings and product categories for the e-retail firms.

Findings

The Amazon site contains proportionately more number of 1-star rated reviews than Flipkart. In Amazon reviews, few product categories are closely associated with 1-star and 2-star reviews, whereas no product categories are closely associated with 1-star and 2-star reviews in Flipkart reviews. The results indicate two distinct communication strategies followed by the firms in managing online consumer reviews.

Research limitations/implications

The authors did not analyse data across demographic details because of access restriction policies of the websites.

Practical implications

Understanding the distribution of review characteristics will improve the consumer’s decision-making ability and using online review content judiciously.

Social implications

This study’s results show significant insights on online retailing by providing cues in using shopping sites and online review characteristics of two prominent retailers.

Originality/value

This paper has brought out a distinct distribution pattern of online review between Amazon and Flipkart. Amazon allows a higher degree of negative contents, whereas Flipkart allows more number of positive reviews.

Details

Vilakshan - XIMB Journal of Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0973-1954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

B. Rajeswari, S. Madhavan, Ramakrishnan Venkatesakumar and S. Riasudeen

This study aims to compare online review characteristics, review length and review sentiment score between “organic” and “regular” food products. In addition, variations…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare online review characteristics, review length and review sentiment score between “organic” and “regular” food products. In addition, variations in the consumer sentiment scores across the review lengths are studied.

Design/methodology/approach

This study fits into the descriptive research design. From Amazon’s website, the consumer product reviews are scrapped. Using the text analytical package “sentiment” in R-Studio, we computed the sentiment scores and counted the number of words in each review. The mean sentiment scores and mean review length are compared for regular and organic products using one-way ANOVA. Sentiment score variation across review length and product class is studied through factorial ANOVA. Sample reviews of ghee and honey are used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The review length shows a significant difference between the regular and organic products. The mean number of words in the regular products reviews is significantly lower than the mean number of words in the organic product reviews. The regular products’ mean sentiment score is significantly lower than the mean sentiment score of organic products. The mean sentiment scores are not consistent between ghee and honey. Sentiment scores are better for organic honey and regular ghee products. For regular ghee products, longer reviews result in lower sentiment scores. For regular and organic versions of honey, longer reviews are associated with better sentiment scores.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not include the helpfulness of a review and the demographic data of the reviewers.

Practical implications

Sentiment scores’ variations across the regular and organic and product categories such as ghee and honey give a comprehensive feedback to the firms. It also indirectly communicates a brand’s evaluation by the consumers and the performance feedback for an upward extension like the organic category.

Social implications

Studies on organic category give feedback for environment-friendly products and consumer attitude shift towards safer products.

Originality/value

Very limited studies have reported the upward line extensions. The authors study the upward line extension organic and associated sentiment scores variation. The role of review length and its systematic influence on the sentiment scores, variations in the review due to the product nature (organic/regular) are unique contributions of this study.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2015

Adam J. Vanhove and Mitchel N. Herian

The relationship between team cohesion and individual well-being is clear. Being part of a highly cohesive team is likely to contribute to the well-being of individual…

Abstract

The relationship between team cohesion and individual well-being is clear. Being part of a highly cohesive team is likely to contribute to the well-being of individual team members. A multidirectional relationship is likely as individual well-being is also likely to contribute to team cohesion. This chapter examines such critical relationships in the context of team performance. To do so, we draw on the dominant literatures related to these concepts, focusing on two specific types of team cohesion – social cohesion and task cohesion – and two specific types of well-being – subjective well-being (SWB) and psychological well-being (PWB). We contend that social cohesion and SWB are likely to be strongly related, while task cohesion and PWB are likely to share a strong relationship. Therefore, the chapter focuses on the evidence regarding the transactional relationship between social team cohesion and SWB, and transactional relationship between task team cohesion and PWB. Of course, we also recognize the close relationships between social and task cohesion, and between SWB and PWB. We consider the practical implications of studying the relationships between these concepts and put forth a number of recommendations for future research in this area.

Details

Team Cohesion: Advances in Psychological Theory, Methods and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-283-2

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Genuine Narzary and Sasmita Palo

The present study aims at investigating mediating–moderating effect of job satisfaction between structural empowerment and organisational citizenship behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims at investigating mediating–moderating effect of job satisfaction between structural empowerment and organisational citizenship behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using standardised questionnaires. Responses were gathered from 178 auxiliary nurse and midwives working in primary health care centres in Chirang and Kokrajhar districts of Assam. Census method of data collection was adopted. The mediating–moderating effect of job satisfaction was assessed using the structural equation modelling.

Findings

Structural equation modelling result shows that structural empowerment has significant and positive effect on job satisfaction (0.68) and organisational citizenship behaviour (0.37). Job satisfaction has significant and positive effect on organisational citizenship behaviour (0.39). Job satisfaction significantly mediates-moderates (0.23) between structural empowerment and organisational citizenship behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Given the only female auxiliary nurse and midwives and comparatively small sample obtained in this study, no attempt should be made to generalise these findings to other nurses or organisations. All data were obtained through a self-report survey, presenting a possibility for common method bias.

Practical implications

Promoting structural empowerment may help medical officer (supervisor) to increase auxiliary nurse and midwives’ level of job satisfaction and promote organisational citizenship behaviour.

Originality/value

This is the first study conducted on the mediating–moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between structural empowerment and organisational citizenship behaviour among auxiliary nurse and midwives workings in rural and semi-urban areas in Assam (India).

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Anthony Gatling, Jungsun (Sunny) Kim and John Milliman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which workplace spirituality (WPS) is related to hospitality supervisors’ organizational commitment (OC) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which workplace spirituality (WPS) is related to hospitality supervisors’ organizational commitment (OC) and intention to quit (ITQ), examined through the lens of self-determination theory (SDT).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on survey data collected from 190 supervisors employed by a large US hospitality organization, the relationships were examined using confirmatory factor analysis, second-order factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that three dimensions of WPS (i.e. meaning and purpose in their work, sense of community and alignment with organizational values) are positively related to OC and negatively related to ITQ. Moreover, these supervisors’ OC fully mediates the negative relationship of WPS to ITQ.

Research limitations/implications

This study tests the validity and reliability of three WPS dimensions in the hospitality environment. It also provides a theoretical perspective through SDT for explaining how WPS impacts employee work attitudes, which can be used to guide future studies.

Practical implications

Hospitality organizations can benefit from the insights of this research into how WPS can increase the commitment and retention of supervisors, who in turn positively impact front-line workers and customer service quality delivery.

Originality/value

This study provides additional implications for SDT and offers new insights into the emerging field of WPS scholarship. While other studies have tested relationships related to involving these WPS variables, a scarcity of research has been offered in hospitality or with a theory-based explanation of these relationships.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Crecencia Godfrey Tarmo and Faisal H. Issa

Groupthink happens in-group decision-making processes whereby members of a group prematurely arrive at a decision that may indicate consensus but for the aim of protecting…

Abstract

Purpose

Groupthink happens in-group decision-making processes whereby members of a group prematurely arrive at a decision that may indicate consensus but for the aim of protecting group harmony. This limits the contributions of the individuals' talents, ideas, competences and experiences to more effective decisions. Although there are a number of studies on predictors (forecasters) of groupthink, they do not consider the influence of the African cultural aspects of collectivism, high power distance and tolerance on groupthink that may characterise the decision-making context in African settings. It is in that context that this case study analyses groupthink in a public sector organization in Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper unveils the presence of groupthink predictors that can affect the quality of decisions made in groups within the Tanzania context. The study was conducted in one of the public institutions in Tanzania that is under the Ministry of Home affairs. The study population included Directors, Managers, Heads of units, District registration officers and other officials as shown in Table 1. These are the people who participate in decision-making processes in the organization and were drawn from different offices of the organization including the headquarter office, Kibaha Data centre, District Registration offices from different regions including Dares Salaam, Coast region, Arusha, Mtwara, Mwanza, Manyara, Mbeya, Singida, Dodoma, Geita, Lindi and Njombe – these 12 administrative regions are among the 27 regions that make up the Tanzania mainland. Through simple random and purposive sampling methods, a total of 97 participants participated effectively. The criterion for participation being participants must have been involved with at least one decision-making group experience. The choice of the organization was done on the basis that it is a relatively a new institution of importance; it was also possible to get from it the needed data.

Findings

The results of the study show that there is the presence of groupthink predictors of high trust, conformity and promotional leadership in decision-making groups in the organization. Furthermore, the diversity of group members alone indicates to be insufficient reason to avoid Groupthink. It is suggested that other important factors might be at play in group decision making including the influence of African cultural characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to only one institution. For a study of this nature to be undertaken access to data could be a very significant problem. Limiting it to one organization we are familiar with made it a bit easy to achieve access.

Practical implications

Group decision making and groupthink are rarely in discourse in Africa. Tanzania is not isolated from the world, and being a country that unity is a cultural tenet that is promoted at every level from the family to national level (Rwegelera, 2003; Tripp, 1999) effects of groupthink is reasonably conspicuous because of the inbuilt national culture that has shaped people to be tolerant and accepting of different perspectives, ethnic groups, religious and races (Tripp, 1999). The same tolerance and acceptance may be transferred to decision-making groups and easily cause the occurrence of groupthink that can affect the quality of decisions made.

Social implications

The Tanzania government has dedicated itself to putting strict measures to prohibit unethical and erroneous decisions that cost the nation including reducing employees' misconduct. The findings of this study indicate that there are hidden aspects like groupthink that are not reached by those measures yet ironically impacts the decisions made in organizations and in turn costs organizations and the country at large and calls for the government and its institutions together with the private sector to be awakened and alerted if they are dedicated and concerned about the quality of decisions they make.

Originality/value

This is an original research work building on previous research. Some findings on groupthink and implications have Western origins. In Africa, we need to figure out what is making the continent not to make significant steps to change the social-economic environment. This study highlights to both African academics and leaders with no management background to make them understand groupthink as a phenomena that has implications to quality decisions. It will also prompt similar studies and therefore widen understanding on decisions making.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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