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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

John Young CBE

The problems of the Lloyd's insurance market over the past few years have been extensively reported. The market survived nevertheless and has since undergone extensive…

Abstract

The problems of the Lloyd's insurance market over the past few years have been extensively reported. The market survived nevertheless and has since undergone extensive restructuring to address the problems of the past. This has included a fundamental review of its regulatory framework. The new Financial Services and Markets Bill introduces oversight of Lloyd's by the Financial Services Authority (FSA), thus implementing the key recommendation of Lloyd's own review of its regulatory arrangements, published last year.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

G.C.G. Moore and Michael V. White

There is no exaggeration in the claim that abstract-deductive political economy in pre-Tractarian Oxford was driven by Richard Whately and hence centred at Oriel College…

Abstract

There is no exaggeration in the claim that abstract-deductive political economy in pre-Tractarian Oxford was driven by Richard Whately and hence centred at Oriel College. At this time Oriel was defined by a group of intellectuals now commonly referred to as the Oriel Noetics, of whom Whately was one, and the nature of Oxford political economy in the opening decades of the nineteenth century (including William F. Lloyd's contribution to it) cannot be understood outside the context of the intellectual tradition established by the Oriel Noetics. The Noetics were unconventional reformist clerics (one could not use the slippery mid-Victorian word ‘liberal’, as they were predominantly conservative Whigs or reform-minded Tories of the Pitt mould, in which order and tradition were maintained through moderate, but not radical, change); admired rational thought and absent-mindedly tested social conventions with their speech; were unafraid to question religious shibboleths if they deemed them bereft of scriptural foundation (such as Sabbatarianism); deployed logical processes to bolster their religious beliefs, which they held in an unsentimental fashion, and thereby to some extent practised that most contradictory of creeds, a logical faith; and, most importantly for this chapter, constructed a Christian Political Economy by dichotomising knowledge into a theological domain, in which they inferred from scriptural evidence that individuals should pursue the ends of attaining specific virtues (not utility!), and a scientific domain, in which they deduced scientific laws that would enable individuals to achieve the ends of attaining these virtues. They looked upon the rising Romantic Movement in general and the spiritualist yearnings of the Oxford Tractarians in particular with simple incomprehension, if not disgust. They deplored with equal measure the Evangelicals' enthusiasms, willing incogitency and lack of institutional anchor, yet sought to establish a broader national church that included dissenters (but not Catholics). They were most prominent in the 1810s and 1820s before colliding violently in the 1830s with, and being sidelined by, the Tractarians, many of whom they had, ironically enough, mentored and promoted.2

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English, Irish and Subversives among the Dismal Scientists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-061-3

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Eystein Gullbekk

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aptness of “information literacy”, conceptualized as a socially contextualized phenomenon, for analyses of interdisciplinary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aptness of “information literacy”, conceptualized as a socially contextualized phenomenon, for analyses of interdisciplinary scholarly communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a conceptual analysis. Two influential representatives of the social turn in the information literacy literature are taken as starting points: Annemaree Lloyds conceptualization of “information literacy practice”, and Jack Andersen’s conceptualization of information literacy as “genre knowledge”. Their positioning of information literacy as a socially contextualized phenomenon – by use of practice theories and rhetorical genre theory, respectively, – is analysed against an illustrative example of interdisciplinary scholarly communication.

Findings

Conceptualizations by Lloyd and Andersen explain information literacy as socially contextualized in terms of stable norms and understandings shared in social communities. Their concepts have the potential of explaining changes and innovations in social practices including scholarly communication. If we combine genre-theoretical and practice-theoretical concepts – and accentuate the open-endedness of social practices and of genres – we can enhance the understanding of information literacy in settings of interdisciplinary scholarly communication where the actors involved lack shared conventions and assumptions.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that the fluid features of social contexts should be accounted for in the information literacy literature. By combining genre-theoretical and practice-theoretical concepts in a novel way it offers such an account. It provides a useful framework for understanding the phenomenon of information literacy in interdisciplinary scholarly communication.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1980

Bill Allen OBE

This famous establishment is unique among the world's insurance organizations. It is an international market whose members cooperate with each other, compete against each…

Abstract

This famous establishment is unique among the world's insurance organizations. It is an international market whose members cooperate with each other, compete against each other, and compete too against other insurance organizations. The scope of its operations and their diversity, the flexibility of its underwriters and their versatility, the speed at which business can be transacted, and above all its integrity, have made Lloyd's of London a familiar and respected name throughout the world. Its history alone is evidence enough of its capacity to survive and flourish, and to adapt and evolve in a rapidly changing world.

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Education + Training, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Annemaree Lloyd

Bodies are central to the information experience, but are not often accounted for as a source of information, that is central to the information literacy experience. Based…

Abstract

Bodies are central to the information experience, but are not often accounted for as a source of information, that is central to the information literacy experience. Based on research with emergency services personnel and with nurses, this chapter explores the role of the body as a locus for understanding and meaning-making. Drawing from a sociocultural perspective, the author suggests that the concept of information experience as a stand-alone conception is meaningless. A solution is to acknowledge the referencing of embodied experience against social conditions and ways of knowing that inform peoples’ experience of practice, as located within the body. Key questions for researchers considering an information experience approach are posed.

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Information Experience: Approaches to Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-815-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Georgios I Zekos

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract…

Abstract

Britain's merchant navy dominated the international maritime trade in the 19th century. The strong ship owners' lobby imposed on the shippers the only choice to contract either under bills of lading drafted almost totally on the ship owners' terms or not to contract. The conflict between Britain and its rival the American merchant navy precipitated a movement for the use of model contracts of shipment (carriage) and towards standardisation of the liability of International liner carriers by legislative intervention. The bill of lading through its use in international trade gained the characteristic of being the document which incorporates the contractual terms. So, the orally agreed contract of carriage gave way to the contract of carriage in the form of a bill of lading.

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Managerial Law, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1938

J.M. Spaight

THE connexion is not at first sight apparent between a small, dark, saw‐dusty, no doubt dirty and inconvenient coffee‐house in the City of London, in the days of William…

Abstract

THE connexion is not at first sight apparent between a small, dark, saw‐dusty, no doubt dirty and inconvenient coffee‐house in the City of London, in the days of William and Mary, and a great modern office building, airy, spacious, centrally heated, electrically lighted, fitted with the most up‐to‐date labour‐saving equipment. There is, nevertheless, a quite definite connection. It was in such a little coffee‐house, then lately removed from Tower Street to Lombard Street, that Lloyd's Register of Shipping, in its first very primitive form as Edward Lloyd's newsletter, had its birth about the end of the seventeenth century. It is in such a great building, on the first floor of Brettenham House on the north side of Waterloo Bridge, that there has been cradled in our own days another lusty infant whose destiny it will probably be to render to aircraft the same service which Lloyd's Register has been rendering to shipping for two centuries or more.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Josephine Vaughan and Michael J. Ostwald

Frank Lloyd Wright's famous house Fallingwater has been the subject of enduring scholarly debate centred on the allegedly clear parallels between its form and that of its…

Abstract

Purpose

Frank Lloyd Wright's famous house Fallingwater has been the subject of enduring scholarly debate centred on the allegedly clear parallels between its form and that of its surrounding natural setting. Despite these claims being repeated many times, no quantitative approach has ever been used to test this argument. In response, this paper uses a quantitative method, fractal analysis, to measure the relationship between the architecture of Fallingwater and of its natural surroundings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using fractal dimension analysis, a computational method that mathematically measures the characteristic visual complexity of an object, this paper mathematically measures and tests the similarity between the visual properties of Fallingwater and its natural setting. Twenty analogues of the natural surroundings of Fallingwater are measured and the results compared to those developed for the properties of eight views of the house.

Findings

Although individual results suggest various levels of visual similarity or difference, the complete set of results do not support the claim that the form of Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater exhibits clear visual similarities to the surrounding landscape.

Originality/value

In addition to testing a prominent theory about Wright's building for the first time, the paper demonstrates a rare application of fractal analysis to interpreting relations between architecture and nature.

Details

Open House International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

M. Anaam Hashmi

A widely used strategy to cope with the dangers of foreign investment by hedging against potential losses is political risk insurance. All multinational corporations are…

Abstract

A widely used strategy to cope with the dangers of foreign investment by hedging against potential losses is political risk insurance. All multinational corporations are subject to political risk perils. Political risk is defined as the adverse effect on the value of a business arising out of direct or indirect actions by a foreign government. Broadly speaking, there are six different types of political risk: confiscation, expropriation and nationalization; contract repudiation and frustration; unfair regulatory environment; currency inconvertibility; contingency; and war risk. Similarly, policies available can be defined according to these six categories. In summary, political risk insurance addresses losses which occur because of politically motivated decisions.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Trine Schreiber

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the ways to practice the written assignment in a university setting in the context of information literacy and in perspective of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the ways to practice the written assignment in a university setting in the context of information literacy and in perspective of Schatzki's practice theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on both a qualitative in-depth study involving individual interviews with students from higher education and the practice theoretical perspective.

Findings

By analyzing informants’ negotiations of the “acceptable” way to perform the written assignment practice, a configuration of the particular practice has been made. In perspective of Schatzki's practice theory, a study into information literacy involves focussing on the changing character of the activities performing the practice in question. In this paper the changing character is analyzed by comparing the configuration of the written assignment practice with a description of the genre of scientific articles. The paper draws the conclusion that the configuration consists of both regular and irregular occurrences. Job orientation and use of social media seemed to influence the written assignment practice as it was performed by the informants.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to research into information literacy in educational settings by proposing an analysis based on Schatzki's theory combined with concepts of routinization, reflexivity, and genre.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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