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Abstract

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International Perspectives on Democratization and Peace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-068-6

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Civilai Terawatanavong, Gregory J. Whitwell and Robert E. Widing

This paper aims to explore how relational constructs (total interdependence, trust, commitment, cooperative norms and conflict) impact the buyer's relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how relational constructs (total interdependence, trust, commitment, cooperative norms and conflict) impact the buyer's relationship satisfaction across the relationship lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through mail survey from a sample of 162 Australian buyers. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to purify the measurement scales and multiple regression analysis techniques using dummy variables were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that interdependence and trust are associated with higher relationship satisfaction in the build‐up and maturity phases while commitment is associated with higher relationship satisfaction in the maturity phase. Unexpectedly, cooperative norms are found to drive relationship satisfaction in both the build‐up and maturity phases. Conflict, however, is not found to affect relationship satisfaction in the decline/deterioration phase.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is the unequal sample size in each of the relationship phases. It would be desirable to run a model consisting of the five relational constructs for each of the three phases.

Originality/value

Literature has suggested that the effects of relational constructs on outcomes vary across relationship phases. While this notion has been established theoretically, there has been little attempt to measure it empirically. This paper provides an empirical test of the important, yet unexplored, question of how different relational constructs have different effects on buyer satisfaction depending upon the relationship phase.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Bulent Sezen and Cengiz Yilmaz

The extent of relational behaviors displayed by independent partners in channels of distribution is a critical determinant of the efficiency and effectiveness of…

Abstract

Purpose

The extent of relational behaviors displayed by independent partners in channels of distribution is a critical determinant of the efficiency and effectiveness of distribution operations. The purpose of this study is to focus on the two key antecedents of relational behaviors in channel dyads, dependence on and trust in the exchange partner, and to explore the relative effects of dependence and trust on each of the three major relational behavior forms of flexibility, information exchange, and solidarity.

Design/methodology/approach

Formal hypotheses are developed in the study regarding the joint and relative effects of dependence and trust on each relational behavior. Data collected from 192 automobile dealerships in Turkey are used for testing the hypotheses through separate regression analyses.

Findings

In line with the main study thesis, the results suggest that the relative effects of dependence on and trust in the supplier differ across dealer flexibility, information exchange, and solidarity displayed toward the supplier firms. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Practical implications

Findings of the study provide guidelines to channel firms in regard to the policies and programs that need to be developed to evoke desired forms of behaviors within their distribution networks.

Originality/value

Considering each relational behavior separately, this study provides support for the view that the emergences of different forms of behaviors in channel relationships occur through different motivational mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Zhizhong Jiang, Stephan C. Henneberg and Peter Naudé

There is conflicting evidence of the extent to which business relationships in the UK construction industry are based on trust between closely collaborating parties or…

Abstract

Purpose

There is conflicting evidence of the extent to which business relationships in the UK construction industry are based on trust between closely collaborating parties or alternatively are more adversarial in nature, based on dependence between the parties. This study seeks to provide empirical evidence about the effects of trust and dependence in business relationships in this industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A large quantitative survey was conducted with buying firms, resulting in a total of 636 usable responses from 404 firms to test a model using structural equation modelling. The authors test the extent to which trust and dependence act as antecedents to four dimensions identified from the literature as being important determinants of relationship quality: commitment, communication, satisfaction, and long‐term orientation.

Findings

The results provide good evidence for the hypotheses in the authors' model: relational characteristics associated with relationship quality are mainly driven by the interpersonal trust between buyers and their suppliers. Interorganisational dependence, evidence of more adversarial relationships, has either no direct impact on relational consequences or at best far less impact than trust.

Originality/value

This research substantiates trust as a key factor influencing relational characteristics associated with relationship quality in the UK construction industry. The findings confirm the earlier work in this industry that trust is an important strategic tool in supplier relationship management.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2018

Jesus Cambra-Fierro, Iguacel Melero-Polo and F. Javier Sese

Drawing from the theory of relationship dynamics, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the relationship life cycle moderates the link between relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the theory of relationship dynamics, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the relationship life cycle moderates the link between relationship quality and customer value co-creation. As customer-firm relationships pass through different stages (exploration, buildup, maturity, and decline) characterized by distinct customer behaviors, this study proposes a dynamic conceptual framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered in financial services firms. The final valid sample comprised 2,000 individuals. Subjective customer information from the questionnaire was combined with objective data that the financial entity provided.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the relationship life cycle plays a key moderating role, revealing that, in the buildup and maturity stages, the influence of relationship quality on customer value co-creation is stronger than in the decline stage. However, for customers in the exploration stage, relationship quality does not lead to customer value co-creation behaviors.

Practical implications

As customer relationship stages are constantly evolving, this study provides companies with additional interesting tools to personalize business strategies and to adapt marketing investments to the specific situation of customers.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to consider how the relationship life cycle influences the strength with which relationship quality promotes customer value co-creation.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Yi Liu, Lei Tao, Yuan Li and Adel I. El‐Ansary

The purpose of this paper is to explore empirically how a distributor's trust in a supplier and its use of control mechanisms affect the values it gains from the relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore empirically how a distributor's trust in a supplier and its use of control mechanisms affect the values it gains from the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Factor analysis and a structural equation model were used to test the framework in a sample of 251 distributors in the household appliances industry in China.

Findings

The findings show that a distributor's honesty trust in a supplier enhances the direct value gained through the use of both contract and relational norms, but hinders and promotes the indirect value gained through the use of contract and relational norms respectively. A distributor's benevolence trust promotes the direct and indirect value gained through the use of relational norms, but impedes the direct value and enhances the indirect value gained through the use of contracts.

Research limitations/implication

A distributor's trust in a supplier may involve competence trust besides honesty trust and benevolence trust. Hence, the framework can be further studied in the situations where the distributor's trust in the supplier's competence is considered. Moreover, the sample of the empirical study only comes from the household appliances industry, and research in future may be extended to include multiple industries.

Practical implications

The paper may help distributors choose and use the proper control mechanism as well as foster a suitable kind of trust in suppliers to realize the objectives of maximizing the relationship value.

Originality/value

The results permit an in‐depth look into the effects of trust and control mechanisms on the relational values in a channel relationship context.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Jesús J. Cambra‐Fierro and Yolanda Polo‐Redondo

This article seeks to analyze the concept of the long‐term orientation of relationships in the supply chain (SC). This research aims to study interactions between…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to analyze the concept of the long‐term orientation of relationships in the supply chain (SC). This research aims to study interactions between satisfaction and commitment with the relational perspective of firm‐supplier relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The establishment of a “post‐satisfaction” framework is necessary. A model based on structural equations is used to test the set of hypotheses.

Findings

The findings show that cooperation, communication, satisfaction, proved trust and commitment explain the long‐term orientation of the relationships in the SC.

Research limitations/implications

This research only considers the buyer's perspective. The article considers some implications relating to different profiles of trust.

Practical implications

The article includes several implications about how to communicate with customers and suppliers, how to cooperate with customers and suppliers, why buyers trust suppliers, how buyers perceive satisfaction, and how buyers commit to suppliers.

Originality/value

This research, based on its “post‐satisfaction” approach, aims to complete the framework proposed by Cambra and Polo. Ideas related to the evolution of trust (“previous” vs “proved” trust) are discussed.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Yi Liu, Jiaqi Xue and Yuan Li

Rather than focussing on dyadic distributor–supplier relationships, this study aims to examine whether the difference in transaction-specific investments (TSIs) between…

Abstract

Purpose

Rather than focussing on dyadic distributor–supplier relationships, this study aims to examine whether the difference in transaction-specific investments (TSIs) between rival suppliers in a supplier–distributor–supplier triad influences whether distributors expropriate or maintain their supplier’s TSIs.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on triadic data from 276 questionnaires that address both the supplier–distributor relationship and the rival supplier–distributor relationship, a moderated regression analysis is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Five out of six hypotheses are supported by the empirical test. The results show that the supplier’s TSIs increase the distributor’s opportunistic behaviour and reduce cooperation when the distributor perceives that the supplier’s TSIs are lower than those of a rival supplier. In contrast, when the distributor perceives that the supplier’s TSIs are higher than those of a competitor, the supplier’s TSIs do not improve cooperation and can shift the link between the supplier’s TSIs and the distributor’s opportunism from being positive to negative.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the top managers of supplier firms embedded in distribution networks. This study suggests that the competitor’s TSIs can be regarded as an indicator of the supplier’s relationship with the distributor. By keeping an eye on their competitors’ TSIs, the top managers of suppliers can predict the likelihood of distributors’ opportunistic and cooperative behaviour and make efforts to improve their position by adjusting their own firm’s TSIs. Furthermore, this information can help suppliers decide on their investment strategies and maintain stable and healthy relationships.

Originality/value

This study 1) examines the effect of TSIs using a triadic framework and triadic data and demonstrates that how a distributor responds to a supplier’s TSIs, with either opportunism or cooperation, depends on the relative level of those TSIs in focal and competitive relationships; and 2) reveals the expropriation effects and restraint effects of TSIs by drawing on prospect theory. This finding indicates the dynamics of TSIs in a triadic relationship.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Yonghoon Choi, Ying Huang and Brenda Sternquist

This paper aims to examine the influence of the salesperson’s characteristics (organizational commitment [OC] and disposition to innovate) on buyer’s behaviors in buyer …

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of the salesperson’s characteristics (organizational commitment [OC] and disposition to innovate) on buyer’s behaviors in buyer – supplier relationships. A model is proposed depicting the effects of the salesperson’s OC and disposition to innovate on buyer’s long-term orientation and opportunism through partner-specific value to the buyer.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 155 sales professionals of Japanese manufacturers. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

As predicted, the salesperson’s OC and disposition to innovate enhance buyer’s long-term orientation through providing partner-specific value to the buyer, and in turn, buyer’s long-term orientation mitigates opportunism.

Practical implications

The salesperson plays an important role for developing and maintaining Buyer-seller relationships. Based on authors’ results, firms should promote salespeople’s OC because a highly committed salesperson is likely to be more innovative when managing the relationship with the buyer and, in turn, increase the relationship-specific value to the buyer.

Originality/value

This study makes two contributions to Buyer-seller relationship literature. First, previous studies on the salesperson focus on the social aspects in the relationship. This study, however, examines the salesperson characteristics in the exchange, and the results reveal the importance of including the salesperson characteristics in studying Buyer-seller relationships. Second, this study proposes the salesperson’s partner-specific value as a key boundary-spanning aspect mediating the salesperson characteristics and buyer’s behaviors in Buyer-seller relationships. The results confirm the argument, thus providing impetus for further studying different types and dimensions of transaction-specific assets in Buyer-seller relationships.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Gilles N'Goala

This research attempts to understand why – or why not – customers resist switching service providers when a critical incident occurs. The paper examines how service…

Abstract

Purpose

This research attempts to understand why – or why not – customers resist switching service providers when a critical incident occurs. The paper examines how service relationship perceptions, such as perceived equity, trust (perceived reliability and benevolence) and relationship commitment (affective and calculative), enhance relationship maintenance and CSR in many critical situations.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in the financial service industry on a sample of 1,999 consumers (retail banking) and then conceptualized and measured CSR in several critical situations.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that perceived equity, perceived reliability, perceived benevolence, affective commitment, and calculative commitment do not influence CSR the same way. CSR mainly depends on the type of critical incident which occurs. For instance, calculative commitment, which is an evaluation of the costs associated with leaving the service provider, enhances CSR in three critical situations (service encounter failures, employee responses to service failures, pricing problems), whereas it leads to relationship disengagement in two other critical situations (inconvenience, changes in the consumer or service provider situation).

Research limitations/implications

This research highlights the need to better take into account the different types of critical incident discussed in the relationship marketing literature and to better consider the complementary roles of perceived equity, trust and relationship commitment in the service switching literature.

Originality/value

This research implies that service companies have to anticipate the critical incidents and to develop specific “shock absorbers” to continue doing business with their current customers.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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