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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2016

Brook E. Sawyer, Patricia H. Manz, Kristin A. Martin, Thomas C. Hammond and Scott Garrigan

A pressing educational concern is how to provide effective education for the growing population of dual language learners (DLL) in early childhood settings. Given the…

Abstract

A pressing educational concern is how to provide effective education for the growing population of dual language learners (DLL) in early childhood settings. Given the robust findings that family involvement promotes children’s academic success as well as recognition of parents’ “funds of knowledge,” one pathway to provide a culturally and linguistically responsive classroom environment for DLLs is to form collaborative relationships between parents and teachers of DLLs. The purpose of this chapter is to describe Project TAPP (Teachers and Parents as Partners), a community of practice (CoP) composed of parents and teachers of preschool dual language learners. The chapter describes the framework of Project TAPP, findings related to participation, and lessons learned.

Details

Family Involvement in Early Education and Child Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-408-2

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Judith Hill‐Weld

This paper seeks to describe the value of utilizing family systems theory as a meta‐theory in psychotherapy with persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe the value of utilizing family systems theory as a meta‐theory in psychotherapy with persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families, at different stages of the family life cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Family systems theory prioritizes the reciprocal impact of the familial group and the individual. As people with intellectual and developmental disabilities often sustain high involvement with their families throughout their lives, family systems theory might be especially relevant to their mental health treatment. In addition, because people with intellectual and developmental disabilities often live in family‐like group settings and systems theory can be applied to family‐like groups, the theory is potentially even more widely applicable.

Findings

The case studies presented describe cases in which persons with intellectual disabilities or their families presented in psychotherapy with mental health or behavioral symptoms. The cases delineate the depathologizing effect of applying a family systems filter to the presenting problems, and the unique ways in which presenting problems may be more effectively addressed by shifting the group dynamics rather than treating only the individual symptoms.

Originality/value

Family systems theory is a well established school of psychotherapeutic treatment, but its value in treating individuals with intellectual disabilities is not well documented or explained. While there is literature on the challenges faced by families impacted by intellectual disability, there is little information, particularly in the USA, about the application of family systems theory to the dynamics of such families or about the benefit to the individual with intellectual disability of this approach to psychotherapy.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

David Ng Foo Seong and Jeanne Marie Ho

The purpose of this paper is to examine the process of information communication technology (ICT) reform in a government school in Singapore. The focus is on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the process of information communication technology (ICT) reform in a government school in Singapore. The focus is on the distributed leadership actions performed by various individuals, and how the multiple leaders and their leadership practices interacted with one another.

Design/methodology/approach

A naturalistic inquiry approach was adopted, involving the case study of a school in the process of implementing an instructional reform involving the use of ICT.

Findings

It was found that distributed leadership for ICT implementation requires a combination of transformational leadership and instructional leadership to develop teachers’ capacity to enhance their instruction with ICT, emotional leadership to support teachers’ effort to change, and strategic management of resources to sustain teachers’ change efforts. Transformational leadership is performed mainly by senior management (SM). Instructional leadership is performed mainly by middle management (MM). Both senior and middle management provided emotional leadership and strategic resource management. In addition, SM provided second‐order changes leadership, while MM provided first‐order changes leadership.

Originality/value

The paper rectifies the current disproportionate focus on the role of the Principal by uncovering the leadership actions performed by other school members, and how these leadership actions are interrelated. In particular, the paper provides insight into how leadership was distributed in a school reform involving the use of ICT for instruction.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Irene H. Yoon and Annie Barton

In empirical research and practitioner guides, turnaround processes tend to be described in terms of discrete stages and strategies. Though necessary, this…

Abstract

Purpose

In empirical research and practitioner guides, turnaround processes tend to be described in terms of discrete stages and strategies. Though necessary, this characterization belies the twists and turns of turnaround leadership. The purpose of this paper is to expand the assumptions of how turnaround proceeds in linear chronos time with the sensibilities of kairos time or the “right” time for turnaround leadership moves.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an exploratory qualitative multi-case study with principals and their key supports (assistant principals, district leaders, teacher leaders) in four public turnaround schools. The grounded theory analysis conceptualizes the experiences of turnaround principals in flexible, complex ways.

Findings

The findings begin with a metaphor and definition of “shifting gears” at chronos and kairos times that emphasizes how turnaround principals make adaptive, agentic adjustments when moving forward through changing terrain. The second half of findings describes each principal’s experiences and reflections on their discernment of the right times for change within a chronological trajectory of turnaround. In addition, the leaders described shifting gears as strategic and responsive to contexts, sometimes taking a psychological toll.

Originality/value

Expanding notions of time in turnaround re-centers turnaround leaders as engaging in intellectually and emotionally demanding work. Such recognition challenges future research to address experiences and emotions in dynamic contexts. Hence, with this study, preparation programs and state and local systems may adjust holistic supports and leadership pipelines to sustain turnaround leaders.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Patricia Harris

The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how shopping well-being emerges from multichannel shopping. The multichannel shopper has more choice of where…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how shopping well-being emerges from multichannel shopping. The multichannel shopper has more choice of where, when and how to shop, and could potentially experience greater shopping well-being than the single-channel equivalent. On the other hand, it is possible that multichannel shopping creates levels of complexity for consumers in terms of their channel decision processes, and therefore, the potential increase in shopping well-being may not actually occur.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive approach is adopted and narratives are used to provide a focus on the multichannel shopper’s lived experiences. Narrative generation was conducted with 12 participant shoppers from across the UK in March and April 2016.

Findings

Multichannel retailing does not deliver universally enhanced shopping well-being. Findings suggest that while well-being is enhanced by some aspects of multichannel shopping, diminished well-being is a more frequent outcome. Six themes emerged from the narratives delineating aspects of multichannel shopping which diminish well-being: finding what you want; ease and flexibility; staying in control; getting a fair deal; pleasure and fulfilment; guilt, regret and annoyance.

Originality/value

This research makes three contributions to our understanding of shopping well-being: by providing more in-depth insight than previous studies, by examining all shopping activity rather than recreational/discretionary shopping and by examining shopping well-being from a multichannel rather than single-channel perspective.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2018

Lauren Gatti, Jessica Masterson, Robert Brooke, Rachael W. Shah and Sarah Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the ways in which attention to programmatic vision and coherence – rather than foci on individual courses – might advance the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the ways in which attention to programmatic vision and coherence – rather than foci on individual courses – might advance the work of justice-oriented, critical English education in important ways. The authors propose that consciously attending to the work of English education on the programmatic level can better enable English educators to cultivate democracy-sustaining dispositions in preservice teachers. Using Grossman et al.s (2008) definition of “programmatic coherence”, the authors illustrate how one interdepartmental partnership is working to create a shared programmatic vision for English education.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on Cornel West’s call for the development of a three-piece democratic armor – Socratic questioning, prophetic witness and tragicomic hope – the authors describe their programmatic vision for cultivating democracy-sustaining dispositions in preservice teachers. They show how this shared vision constitutes the foundation for the organization, purpose and sequence of the four-semester cohort program. Finally, the authors describe how this vision helps facilitate meaningful and purposeful symbiosis between field experiences and university coursework.

Findings

In an effort to promote replicability regarding programmatic coherence, the authors share structural aspects of their program as well as pose generative questions for colleagues who are interested in approaching the work of critical, democratic English education from the programmatic level.

Originality/value

Addressing the challenges of teacher preparation – especially in this polarized and pitched historical moment – requires shifting the focus from individual courses to a more expansive view that might enable English educators to consider how courses within a program might collectively advance a particular vision of critical and democratic English education.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Angus Bancroft, Martina Karels, Órla Meadhbh Murray and Jade Zimpfer

This chapter examines the history and process of research participants producing and working with data. The experience of working with researcher-produced and/or analysed…

Abstract

This chapter examines the history and process of research participants producing and working with data. The experience of working with researcher-produced and/or analysed data shows how social research is a set of practices which can be shared with research participants, and which in key ways draw on everyday habits and performances. Participant-produced data has come to the fore with the popularity of crowdsourced, citizen science research and Games with a Purpose. These address practical problems and potentially open up the research process to large scale democratic involvement. However at the same time the process can become fragmented and proletarianised. Mass research has a long history, an exemplar of which is the Mass Observation studies. Our research involved participants collecting video data on their intoxication practices. We discuss how their experience altered their own subject position in relation to these regular social activities, and explore how our understanding of their data collection converged and differed from theirs. Crowdsourced research raises a challenge to the research binary as the work is done by participants rather than the research team; however it also reaffirms it, unless further work is done to involve participants in commenting and reflecting on the research process itself.

Details

Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-050-6

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Barbara Myers, Kaye Thorn and Noeleen Doherty

Research into self-initiated expatriation (SIE) has increased exponentially, although the focus of these investigations has been on professional workers, and little has…

Abstract

Purpose

Research into self-initiated expatriation (SIE) has increased exponentially, although the focus of these investigations has been on professional workers, and little has been gender specific. The purpose of this research therefore is to explore the career and personal motivations for SIE through the novel lens of older women. In this exploratory study, SIE and socio-emotional selectivity motivation theories (SSTs) are used, in addition to the Kaleidoscope Career Model (KCM), to understand the reasons these women have taken this path.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a qualitative methodology, drawing on in-depth life story interviews with 21 women aged 50 or more who had taken a SIE. A five-step narrative process using a story-telling approach was the method of analysis.

Findings

The findings show important contradictions to the extant literature. Career dissatisfaction and escape are key motivations for these women. Further, contrary to SST, these women were seeking novelty–new places and new experiences. These women were also seeking authenticity as suggested by KCM, but also challenge was to the fore–not in the career domain, but in the personal domain. Their motivations for SIE extend beyond the current evidence base and understanding of the phenomena.

Originality/value

The contributions include new insights into the motivational drivers for SIE for these older women and the importance of timing as facilitators of SIE. The SIE nomenclature is broadened through the inclusion of older women and beyond professional spheres. An initial framework of a more integrated model is developed from this exploratory study and presented as a basis for beginning to understand the phenomenon of older women undertaking SIE.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

T. Cassidy, C. Cassidy, S. Cassie and M. Arkison

Gives a review of the various methods which have been developed to measure the stiffness of fabric and describes a new method. This new approach enables the testing of…

Abstract

Gives a review of the various methods which have been developed to measure the stiffness of fabric and describes a new method. This new approach enables the testing of knitted fabrics which are difficult to test using the cantilever system. The inter‐operative reproducibility of the new instrument is compared with that of the cantilever method and the drape meter. Also reports inter‐laboratory comparisons on woven fabric and on knitted fabric, the latter having been measured on a KES‐F system.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Qun Shi, Wangda Ying, Lei Lv and Jiajun Xie

This paper aims to present an intelligent motion attitude control algorithm, which is used to solve the poor precision problems of motion-manipulation control and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an intelligent motion attitude control algorithm, which is used to solve the poor precision problems of motion-manipulation control and the problems of motion balance of humanoid robots. Aiming at the problems of a few physical training samples and low efficiency, this paper proposes an offline pre-training of the attitude controller using the identification model as a priori knowledge of online training in the real physical environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The deep reinforcement learning (DRL) of continuous motion and continuous state space is applied to motion attitude control of humanoid robots and the robot motion intelligent attitude controller is constructed. Combined with the stability analysis of the training process and control process, the stability constraints of the training process and control process are established and the correctness of the constraints is demonstrated in the experiment.

Findings

Comparing with the proportion integration differentiation (PID) controller, PID + MPC controller and MPC + DOB controller in the humanoid robots environment transition walking experiment, the standard deviation of the tracking error of robots’ upper body pitch attitude trajectory under the control of the intelligent attitude controller is reduced by 60.37 per cent, 44.17 per cent and 26.58 per cent.

Originality/value

Using an intelligent motion attitude control algorithm to deal with the strong coupling nonlinear problem in biped robots walking can simplify the control process. The offline pre-training of the attitude controller using the identification model as a priori knowledge of online training in the real physical environment makes up the problems of a few physical training samples and low efficiency. The result of using the theory described in this paper shows the performance of the motion-manipulation control precision and motion balance of humanoid robots and provides some inspiration for the application of using DRL in biped robots walking attitude control.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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