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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

P. Thrulogachantar and Suhaiza Zailani

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the importance of purchasing strategies contribution on manufacturing performance, realizing purchasing function as a key component…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the importance of purchasing strategies contribution on manufacturing performance, realizing purchasing function as a key component in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 750 questionnaires were distributed via e‐mail and resulted in 158 questionnaires or 21 percent being returned with complete information and used for statistical analysis, to study the significant level of the constructed model among manufacturing firms located in major industrial states in Malaysia.

Findings

The results obtained reveal that purchasing strategies create significant positive impact on manufacturing performance which comprises the competitive priorities of the firms in terms of quality, cost, cycle time, new product introduction time line, delivery speed and dependability and finally, customization responsiveness performance.

Research limitations/implications

Manufacturing firms should focus on purchasing strategies, effective negotiation, supplier collaborative relationship and interaction; effective cost management and supply base management as navigators for their excellence performance in the current volatile market conditions.

Originality/value

The paper shows that purchasing strategies are vital for manufacturing firms in order to remain competitive and relevant in the challenging and competitive business environment.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Case study
Publication date: 1 November 2018

A Narayanan and S Seshadri

This case study is designed to explore the challenges of forecasting and inventory management in spare parts industry. Most items in this industry have lumpy…

Abstract

This case study is designed to explore the challenges of forecasting and inventory management in spare parts industry. Most items in this industry have lumpy, intermittent, erratic and slow demand patterns. Traditional forecasting techniques cannot be applied to this group. Also most textbook methods on inventory planning, assumes the demand is normally distributed – which is also not the case in spare parts industry. Strategies can be tested for the demand data provide for about 40 items

Details

Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2631-598X
Published by: Council for Supply Chain Management Professionals

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Shelen W.H. Ho

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) initiative poses both significant opportunities and difficult challenges to the Malaysian SME communities. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) initiative poses both significant opportunities and difficult challenges to the Malaysian SME communities. This study aims to investigate the preparedness of the local SMEs to compete and exploit opportunities in a post-AEC era. The aim is to contribute to existing literature and knowledge base on SMEs’ practices in the ASEAN region. The manufacturing sector has been selected for study, and the research efforts focus on procurement competencies. SME procurement practices in the two largest manufacturing sub-sectors in Malaysia – resource-based (RB) and electrical and electronics (E&E) – are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Preparedness for AEC is gauged from four key performance areas summarized from literature review. Six key research activities are also identified for each performance area from the findings of previous works. Data were collected using a survey instrument and face-to-face interviews. Research methodology is primarily qualitative with quantitative data for robustness check.

Findings

The findings reveal peculiar procurement practices in Malaysian SME manufacturers that have significant implications on their preparedness to compete effectively post-AEC. The findings also highlighted the key influences that have contributed to variations in Malaysian SMEs’ attitude toward trade liberalization challenges and business process improvements in comparison with practices in foreign firms and more advanced economies.

Originality/value

Theoretical models have been adopted across business settings and environments by managers. This study reveals managerial practices in Malaysian SME manufacturers run counter to developed theories. The peculiarities and business attitudes of this resilient economic sector can be an important input to managerial decision-making when analyzing business activities in the region.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Andrew Pressey, Nikolaos Tzokas and Heidi Winklhofer

Previous research has reported that the adoption of a strategic purchasing orientation (SPO) requires closer relationships with key suppliers and greater long‐term…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has reported that the adoption of a strategic purchasing orientation (SPO) requires closer relationships with key suppliers and greater long‐term planning in supply management. This paper aims to develop a generic framework for the evaluation of key supply relationships incorporating seven key categories and to empirically test these assumptions by comparing firms reporting high levels of strategic purchasing to those with low levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection employed a mail survey sent to the senior manager responsible for purchasing in their organisation (n = 50).

Findings

The article finds that high SPO firms more closely scrutinise their supply relationships across a broad range of attributes, and, as well as perennially important issues such as quality and delivery, they emphasise “fit” between buyer and supplier (e.g. fit with the competitive strategy and organisational culture of the buying firm) as an important criterion in identifying failing relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The positioning of the current study as one of the first to address the evaluation of suppliers under strategic purchasing adoption calls for further replication.

Practical implications

The results of this study afford suppliers an understanding of the criteria by which firms adopting strategic purchasing evaluate troubled or weak relationships. This would seem particularly timely given the shift towards strategic purchasing by many organisations.

Originality/value

This study presents one of the first attempts to assess “ineffective” supplier performance and to incorporate metrics on strategic supplier selection.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 February 2016

Bhashkar Mazumder

Ideal estimates of the intergenerational elasticity (IGE) in income require a large panel of income data covering the entire working lifetimes for two generations…

Abstract

Ideal estimates of the intergenerational elasticity (IGE) in income require a large panel of income data covering the entire working lifetimes for two generations. Previous studies have demonstrated that using short panels and covering only certain portions of the life cycle can lead to considerable bias. I address these biases by using the PSID and constructing long time averages centered at age 40 in both generations. I find that the IGE in family income in the United States is likely greater than 0.6 suggesting a relatively low rate of intergenerational mobility in the United States. I find similar sized estimates for the IGE in labor income. These estimates support the prior findings of Mazumder (2005a, b) and are also similar to comparable estimates reported by Mitnik et al. (2015). In contrast, a recent influential study by Chetty, Hendren, Kline, Saez (2014) using tax data that begins in 1996 estimates the IGE in family income for the United States to be just 0.344 implying a much higher rate of intergenerational mobility. I demonstrate that despite the seeming advantages of extremely large samples of administrative tax data, the age structure, and limited panel dimension of the data used by Chetty et al. leads to considerable downward bias in estimating the IGE. I further demonstrate that the sensitivity checks in Chetty et al. regarding the age at which children’s income is measured, and the length of the time average of parent income used to estimate the IGE suffer from biases due to these data limitations. There are also concerns that tax data, unlike survey data, may not adequately reflect all sources of family income. Estimates of the rank–rank slope, Chetty et al.’s preferred estimator, are more robust to the limitations of the tax data but are also downward biased and modestly overstate mobility. However, Chetty et al.’s main findings of sizable geographic differences within the US in rank mobility are unlikely to be affected by these biases. I conclude that researchers should continue to use both the IGE and rank-based measures depending on their preferred concept of mobility. It is also important for researchers to have adequate coverage of key portions of the life cycle and to consider the possible drawbacks of using administrative data.

Details

Inequality: Causes and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-810-0

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

M. Tawfik Mady, Tarek T. Mady and Sarah T. Mady

The purpose of this study is to report and contrast manufacturer–supplier relationships, supplier selection and procurement performance of two manufacturing sectors in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to report and contrast manufacturer–supplier relationships, supplier selection and procurement performance of two manufacturing sectors in Kuwait. The effect of supplier relationship and selection on the performance of the procurement function was also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys of supplier selection, supplier relationship and procurement performance are taken from 62 plants operating in 2 competitive manufacturing sectors in Kuwait (foods industry and refractors industry). The study utilizes multivariate and multi-regression analyses in understanding the effect of supplier relationship and selection on the performance of the procurement function.

Findings

Findings indicate a significant effect of supplier relationship and supplier selection on a plant’s procurement performance. However, variance in plant size and/or industrial sector was found to not affect this relationship.

Originality/value

Despite the significance of the Gulf states and the growing importance of the manufacturing sector in these countries, relatively little is known about how buyers and suppliers within this sector interact. This study is the first to document supplier relationships and selection processes in this area of the world. The study also provides a reliable and valid scale for measuring the performance of the procurement function in the Kuwaiti manufacturing sector. Furthermore, the postulated impact of supplier–buyer relationships on the performance of the procurement functions was investigated in a newly emerging economy in the Gulf.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Mikael Frödell

Despite numerous examples of benefits when adapting supplier relationship management in the manufacturing industry, the construction industry still lags behind in such…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite numerous examples of benefits when adapting supplier relationship management in the manufacturing industry, the construction industry still lags behind in such areas as long‐term relationships with suppliers and continuous cost‐reductions. This may be because the characteristics of the construction industry differ from those of the manufacturing industry due to their project‐based structure, its inherent tendency for sub‐optimization and the vast number and variety of suppliers. The purpose of this study is to identify criteria for achieving efficient contractor‐supplier relations in the construction industry and for large contractors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the literature on efficiency and differentiation of efficient buyer‐supplier relationships as well as a two‐year case study based on participatory observations and interviews with strategic purchasers at a large Swedish contractor.

Findings

As it is not always possible to increase efficiency in the interface‐related value‐creating processes by only aiming the development and improvement efforts directly at these processes, relationship enablers such as total cost focus, aligned core values as well as willingness and capability for collaboration and development must first be in place. In order to achieve this, the contractor has to adopt a long‐term orientation towards the relationship with the suppliers, which is a decision for the management to make.

Practical implications

Drawing from the findings, this paper elucidates the connection between increased efficiency and input variables in the contractor‐supplier relationship, which might be difficult for contractors to see. Furthermore, contractors need to take responsibility over their own processes in order to be an attractive customer to the supplier.

Originality/value

Even though research within construction has focused on relations between different actors, mostly client and contractor, this paper widens the perspective and takes a grasp of the relationship between contractor and supplier.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Ramnath Dixit and Vinita Sinha

This chapter discusses key training challenges that organizations need to confront with the objective of building a robust human resource management system. Given the…

Abstract

This chapter discusses key training challenges that organizations need to confront with the objective of building a robust human resource management system. Given the dynamics of the current business environment, training and development has become an indispensable function in global organizations. Building an effective human capital that contributes to continual organizational growth has become the established norm to survive in a competitive business landscape. However, the training and development function is often rendered ineffective, on account of various bottlenecks existing in the organization. Addressing these bottlenecks is quintessential in ensuring the creation of a performance-driven human capital. The goal of this chapter is to draw attention to the training impediments that hinder organizational growth and to diagnose the underlying causes for the same. This chapter concludes with recommendations that organizational decision-makers can leverage in their quest to strengthen the human capital, by utilizing their training and development infrastructure optimally.

Details

Contemporary Global Issues in Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-393-9

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Jerker Denrell

The garbage can model showed that what appears to be irrational and unpredictable choices can be explained by processes that regulate attention allocation and the…

Abstract

The garbage can model showed that what appears to be irrational and unpredictable choices can be explained by processes that regulate attention allocation and the availability of choice alternatives. Because attention to alternatives fluctuates, the model generates context-dependent choices: evaluations of alternatives depend on the mix of other alternatives considered. I re-examine the mechanisms by which fluctuating attention can cause context-dependent choices. Using insights from behavioral decision theory I demonstrate how adding fluctuating attention to a well-known model of organizational decision making generates context-dependent choices of a kind that could not be explained by a maximizing process.

Details

The Garbage Can Model of Organizational Choice: Looking Forward at Forty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-713-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Mabel Blades

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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