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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Stephen J.J. McGuire, Ellen A. Drost, K. Kern Kwong, David Linnevers, Ryan Tash and Oxana Lavrova

A family business founded by Chinese immigrants grew into a $133 million toy and costume maker by exploiting seasonal niche segments in the highly competitive, global toy…

Abstract

A family business founded by Chinese immigrants grew into a $133 million toy and costume maker by exploiting seasonal niche segments in the highly competitive, global toy industry. Sales of traditional toys stagnated when replaced by game consoles and electronic toys. Unable to compete in high tech toys, MegaToys moved instead toward seasonal products. In 2007, brothers Peter and Charlie Woo were about to pitch what they hoped would be $63 million in Easter basket sales to Wal-Mart. If Wal-Mart took the full order, it would come to represent over half of MegaToys' revenue.

The company was faced with the dilemma of how to grow, and at what pace. Charlie Woo knew that MegaToys could continue to grow as long as it was able to satisfy Wal-Mart's demands. Peter Woo wondered if this was the smartest way to grow the business. “Growth is a good thing as long as you don't sell your shirt to get it,” he noted. Should MegaToys continue to increase its sales to Wal-Mart, or would dependence on Wal-Mart eventually threaten the firm's success? Were there other, untapped opportunities for MegaToys that were well aligned with its strengths, resources, and capabilities?

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Gina Vega

Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Jacqueline Howard

The replacement of long‐stay hospitals by Care in the Community provides an opportunity to reflect on the quality of people's lives in the community and use of resources…

Abstract

The replacement of long‐stay hospitals by Care in the Community provides an opportunity to reflect on the quality of people's lives in the community and use of resources. New ways of assisting people with learning disabilities to live in their own homes are emerging. These ‘supported living’ arrangements do not offer a model but rather some guiding principles for finding out how people want to live, and the design, development and co‐ordination of informal and formal supports. The conditions working for and against developing supported living as a mainstream option are reviewed, and what is being learnt about person‐centred planning; supporting people with complex needs; managing costs and service effectiveness; and the enabling role of purchasers.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Melody L. A. LeHew and Ann E. Fairhurst

In light of several successful US mall repositionings, industry experts have encouraged other less productive properties to follow their lead. This study investigates the…

Abstract

In light of several successful US mall repositionings, industry experts have encouraged other less productive properties to follow their lead. This study investigates the relationship between selected mall attributes and productivity. A mail survey was sent to a random sample of mall marketing managers. Chi‐square and correlation analysis was used to identify the attributes that were significantly related to productivity. Super‐regional malls located in large, densely populated cities with high income residents were the most successful properties. The results suggest that the attributes of successful malls cannot be transferred or adapted by lower performing malls. Market strategy variables that could be duplicated were not significantly related to high productivity.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Aamir Ali Chughtai and Finian Buckley

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of trust in top management and trust in team members on research scientists' work engagement. Specifically, it is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of trust in top management and trust in team members on research scientists' work engagement. Specifically, it is proposed that the link between trust in top management and work engagement will be mediated by organizational identification whereas the relationship between trust in team members and work engagement will be mediated by team psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 170 research scientists, drawn from six Irish science research centres. Structural equation modelling was used to test the direct and mediating effects.

Findings

Results revealed that as hypothesised, organizational identification and team psychological safety fully mediated the effects of trust in top management and trust in team members on work engagement respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional research design and the use of self‐reported data are the main limitations of this research. Additionally, the team psychological safety scale exhibited a relatively low reliability and, therefore, the results should be viewed with caution. Limitations aside, this study demonstrates that science researchers' trust in top management and their fellow team members is likely to be an important driver of work engagement.

Originality/value

This is the first study which has empirically established a link between work engagement and two distinct forms of trust. In addition, it also uncovers the psychological processes through which researchers' trust in top management and their team members can influence work engagement.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Gary D. Holt and Jack S. Goulding

This paper presents and describes an outcome-oriented dissertation study model called “PROD2UCT”, designed explicitly for students engaged in construction engineering and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents and describes an outcome-oriented dissertation study model called “PROD2UCT”, designed explicitly for students engaged in construction engineering and related subjects research.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is grounded in theory, underpinned by extant literature and reinforced with professional domain expertise.

Findings

PROD2UCT identifies seven key stages in outcome-oriented dissertation study: pick, recognise, organise, document and draft, undertake, consolidate and tell. These are described along with practical considerations for their effective implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The model’s primary influences stem from “best practice”, experiential knowledge, pedagogical ideals and academic views/values. Given this, it is acknowledged that “representation” and “inference” are typically governed by “subjectivity” (which naturally differs from person-to-person).

Originality/value

Originality is threefold: PROD2UCT encourages students to consider the “end” before the “beginning”; it serves as a road-map offering guidance at seven key chronological stages; finally, it is specifically designed to be outcome-oriented. The latter requires intended dissertation outcomes to align with evidence, research design decisions and implementation methods.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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