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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Jordan Taylor Bakhsh, Luke R. Potwarka and Ryan Snelgrove

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects that exposure to a youth day event at an elite sport competition has on youth spectators’ motivations to participate in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects that exposure to a youth day event at an elite sport competition has on youth spectators’ motivations to participate in the sport on display.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was underpinned by the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Pre- and post-event questionnaires were administered to local grade seven and eight students (n=318) as part of a youth day event at the 2016 Milton International Track Cycling Challenge in Ontario, Canada. Questionnaires assessed each TPB construct one week before the youth day and immediately following the event.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about the shifts from pre- to post-event behavioral antecedent measures. Results suggest youth day events can be effective at driving positive shifts in participation intention and subjective norm among youth populations.

Research limitations/implications

A control group was not possible as an ethical limitation was created from the school boards which did not allow for some students/classes within the study to not experience the event. Researchers are encouraged to develop a study which allows for a youth control group and assesses the shift in behavioral antecedents at multiple time points post-event.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for how to leverage subjective norms as a means of motivating post-event participation.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils a methodological gap to move beyond cross-sectional data and employ pre-post event research designs to measure the effect spectating an elite sport competition can have on youth’s motivation to participate in the sport on display.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Laura Wood, Ryan Snelgrove, Julie Legg, Marijke Taks and Luke R. Potwarka

Hosting events can attract visitors to an area and provide an opportunity for local businesses in the host community to benefit economically. Restaurants, in particular…

Abstract

Purpose

Hosting events can attract visitors to an area and provide an opportunity for local businesses in the host community to benefit economically. Restaurants, in particular, have an opportunity to benefit as food is a necessary expenditure. However, previous research suggests that the intentional attraction of event visitors by local businesses has been minimal. The purpose of this paper is to explore perspectives of event leveraging held by restaurant owners/managers and a destination marketing organization (DMO).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with owners/managers of 16 local restaurants and from three DMO executives in one medium-sized city in Ontario, Canada. Data were analyzed using initial and axial coding.

Findings

Findings indicate that restaurants did not engage in event leveraging. Three common reasons emerged to explain their lack of engagement in leveraging, including: a lack of a belief in benefits from leveraging, inconvenient proximity to event venue, and not being prepared for event leveraging opportunities. The DMO had a desire to assist local business in leveraging, but their ability to do so was negatively impacted by a lack of awareness of events being hosted, disengagement by local businesses, and limited resources.

Originality/value

Findings suggest that there is a need for DMOs and local businesses to create stronger and more supportive working relationships that address financial and human resources constraints preventing the adoption and success of event leveraging. As part of this approach there is a need for cities to make stronger financial investments in supportive agencies such as a DMO.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Luke R. Potwarka, Ryan Snelgrove, Laura Wood, Georgia Teare and Daniel Wigfield

The purpose of this study was to examine whether watching a live track cycling event could increase youths' intention to participate in the sport, and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine whether watching a live track cycling event could increase youths' intention to participate in the sport, and to identify cognitive and affective mechanisms associated with post-event intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of youth spectators (n = 362) who experienced the 2016 Milton International Track Cycling Challenge completed pre- and post-event questionnaires to assess intention to participate and cognitive and affective components of their spectator experience.

Findings

Respondents' intentions to participate post-event were significantly higher than pre-event. Results also indicated that state inspiration mediated relationships between three cognitive dimensions of sport spectator experiences (i.e. fantasy, flow, evaluation) and intention to participate.

Practical implications

Sport managers should design youth day events to engage with youth prior to the event to increase their knowledge of the sport. This prior engagement may help youth to evaluate performances effectively. Moreover, event experience should be designed to incorporate vicarious and immersive experiences tailored to youth spectators.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first to assess intentions to participate among youth spectators at multiple time points (i.e. before and after an event) and identifies specific mechanism within the spectator experience that may lead to a demonstration effect.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Case study
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Alexandra Snelgrove and Ariane Ryan

The case addresses issues related to value chains, sustainable businesses, business environment in emerging economies and cross-cultural issues.

Abstract

Subject area

The case addresses issues related to value chains, sustainable businesses, business environment in emerging economies and cross-cultural issues.

applicability/applicability

This case would be best addressed by students in upper years of their undergraduate degree or at a Master's level.

Case overview

The case addresses a project conducted by MEDA in Pakistan which focused on developing a value chain in the embroidery sector with the end goal of improving the livelihood of homebound rural women. The case walks the students through the local cultural constraints, the project design the development of the various value chain actors and the most significant outcomes. The primary issue requires the students to evaluate the most appropriate exit strategy for MEDA which would not harm the existing networks and allow the whole value chain to continue sustainably.

Expected learning outcomes

To appreciate the complexity of value chain development while understanding the benefits and opportunities they offer. To understand the importance of sustainability and how this can be achieved using market tools. To grasp the concept of exit strategies in the context of development projects and explore various ways these can be structured. To identify the impact of culture on business environment. Integrating the poor into thriving markets. Business as a development tool.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Thomas J. Aicher, Kostas Karadakis and Melfy M Eddosary

The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the authors compared tourists with local participants to determine if motivations to participate in a mid-scale marathon…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the authors compared tourists with local participants to determine if motivations to participate in a mid-scale marathon event varied based on participant type, and if they perceived the event differently. Second, Kaplanidou and Vogt suggested further testing and validation of their scale to measure meanings people attach to sport events was warranted, and the current investigation provides such evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Working with the event organizer, the authors distributed an online questionnaire to marathon participants in a mid-scale event. The questionnaire included the Sport Motivation Scale-II, Sport Event Evaluation Scale, and demographics.

Findings

Results indicated no differences between sport tourists and residents in motivation and meanings attached to the event; however, differences in perception did exist. Data further validated the Sport Event Evaluation Scale.

Research limitations/implications

The study established self-determination theory (SDT) as a viable theoretical framework to understand sport event participants motivations. It demonstrated a possible link between the individuals’ motivations and the meanings they associate with the event.

Practical implications

The paper provides data to support marketing the healthy benefits of participating in a marathon event as well as the need to include the fun and entertaining components of the event as well.

Originality/value

The study is a unique application of SDT as well as applies a theoretical framework to an area of study that has largely focussed on categorizations. Additionally, the findings establish initial findings that local participants and sport tourists possess similar forms of motivation and attach similar meanings to event participation.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Gavin Melles

In the UK, Masters level discipline-specific courses in sustainability integrate modules on the social, economic, and environmental issues of sustainable development. The…

Abstract

In the UK, Masters level discipline-specific courses in sustainability integrate modules on the social, economic, and environmental issues of sustainable development. The postgraduate faculty teaching on these courses and the student cohorts enrolling in such courses bring varying attitudes, experiences, and beliefs to the ecological and anthropological discourses and practices about sustainable development. Existing studies of education for sustainable development (ESD) have identified strengths and weaknesses in the knowledge and attitudes of students and faculty although few studies have focused on postgraduate cohorts and fewer still have attempted to compare and contrast students and lecturers. This mixed method case study analyses findings from data collected (2016–2017) from student surveys (n = 121) and semi-structured interviews with faculty (n = 21) recruited from multiple university departments, centers, and programs (n = 12) to identify prevailing anthropocentric and eco-centric ideas and rationales about sustainable development and ESD. Findings suggest a strong orientation to mainstream sustainable development in both groups but analysis identifies reasons for resisting a focus on extremes of “deep green” or “green wash” approaches. In addition, prevailing belief in academic neutrality, institutional and disciplinary factors, student pragmatism, and other drivers are highlighted. The study concludes by identifying potential paths from prevailing (experiential) education in sustainable development to more transformational approaches.

Details

Teaching and Learning Strategies for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-639-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Sally Smith, Thomas N. Garavan, Anne Munro, Elaine Ramsey, Colin F. Smith and Alison Varey

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of professional and leader identity and the maintenance of identity, through identity work as IT professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of professional and leader identity and the maintenance of identity, through identity work as IT professionals transitioned to a permanent hybrid role. This study therefore contributes to the under-researched area of permanent transition to a hybrid role in the context of IT, where there is a requirement to enact both the professional and leader roles together.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a longitudinal design and two qualitative methods (interviews and reflective diaries) to gather data from 17 IT professionals transitioning to hybrid roles.

Findings

The study findings reveal that IT professionals engage in an ongoing process of reconciliation of professional and leader identity as they transition to a permanent hybrid role, and they construct hybrid professional–leader identities while continuing to value their professional identity. They experience professional–leader identity conflict resulting from reluctance to reconcile both professional and leader identities. They used both integration and differentiation identity work tactics to ameliorate these tensions.

Originality/value

The longitudinal study design, the qualitative approaches used and the unique context of the participants provide a dynamic and deep understanding of the challenges involved in performing hybrid roles in the context of IT.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Anne Koskiniemi, Hanna Vakkala and Ville Pietiläinen

The purpose of this study is to take an existential-phenomenological perspective to understand and describe the experienced leader identity development of healthcare…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to take an existential-phenomenological perspective to understand and describe the experienced leader identity development of healthcare leaders working in dual roles. Leader identity development under the influence of strong professional identities of nurses and doctors has remained an under-researched phenomenon to which the study contributes.

Design/methodology/approach

Existential-phenomenology serves as a perspective underpinning the whole research, and an existential-phenomenological method is applied in the interview data analysis.

Findings

The study showed leader identity development in healthcare to be most strongly influenced and affected by clinical work and its meanings and followers’ needs and leader–follower relationships. In addition, four other key categories were presented as meaningful in leader identity development; leader identity development is an ongoing process occurring in relations of the key categories.

Originality/value

The existential-phenomenological approach and analysis method offer a novel way to understand leader identity development and work identities as experienced.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Jacob Guinot, Ricardo Chiva and Vicente Roca-Puig

Due to the divergent conclusions about the effects of interpersonal trust on job satisfaction, the study aims to look more deeply into this relationship by introducing job…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the divergent conclusions about the effects of interpersonal trust on job satisfaction, the study aims to look more deeply into this relationship by introducing job stress as a mediator variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses structural equation modeling to analyze the opinions of 6,407 Spanish employees, taken from the 2008 Quality of Working Life Survey carried out by the Spanish Ministry of Labor and Immigration.

Findings

The findings show that interpersonal trust has a positive effect on job satisfaction, and that job stress partially mediates this relationship. Furthermore, interpersonal trust is negatively related to job stress, which in turn is negatively related to job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the pertinence and size of the database used in the study, it is very heterogeneous. Future research might delimit the database by organization size or sector. Qualitative studies may also improve our understanding of the relationships studied and enable other concepts to be included.

Practical implications

Cultivating a climate of trust may provide organizations with a strategy to improve levels of mental well-being and satisfaction among their employees.

Originality/value

This research explains why interpersonal trust has a positive effect on job satisfaction. The paper's conceptualization of trust implies risk assumption and low risk perception; low perception of risk is presumed to reduce job stress, and in turn, increase job satisfaction. The paper also puts forward reasons for why “excessive” interpersonal trust has been related to negative effects on job satisfaction. “Excessive” trust might infer high risk perception, which might increase job stress, and in turn decrease job satisfaction.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Carmenza Gallego and Gregorio Calderón Hernández

This paper aims to comprehend organizational transformation (OT) as a permanent, continuous and iterative system, which integrates large transformations that, in turn…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to comprehend organizational transformation (OT) as a permanent, continuous and iterative system, which integrates large transformations that, in turn, require smaller, additional transformations. For OT implementation, a conceptual model is proposed, called the four orders of OT.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study with a qualitative approach, used critical incident interviews, which were applied to describe both successful and unsuccessful events. Participants were chosen by convenience, and information was processed with Nvivo software.

Findings

The Colombian family holding studied was founded in 1974, and in its 47 years of existence, has implemented important transformations in its three companies. These showcase the four types of OT proposed, although third order support has been applied most often. The events that triggered said transformations are mainly of exogenous character, and broad responsibility was found on both the upper management and work team levels for implementation processes. This was also found for the indicator use and the various planning approaches used, depending upon the transformation type.

Practical implications

Future research is required, so as to refine and validate the conceptual OT model proposed in other types of companies and development contexts. The proposed construct permits company managers to design and more efficiently manage transformations, while satisfying the diverse orders proposed in the theoretical model.

Originality/value

An integrative conceptual model called “the four orders of OT” is proposed and validated in a Colombian family businesses group, which is composed of three companies.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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