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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Ryan Sharp

Research surrounding psychological capital (PsyCap) continues to expand as scholars and organizational leaders look to the strengths of positive organizational behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

Research surrounding psychological capital (PsyCap) continues to expand as scholars and organizational leaders look to the strengths of positive organizational behavior (POB) and its effects in the workplace. Although previous research underscores connections between PsyCap and various organizational outcomes, there remains little research on its actual development. The purpose of this paper is to determine the efficacy of a six-week work-site intervention in improving PsyCap. The study included 49 individuals (n=32 assigned to the treatment group and n=17 to the comparison group). Using a pretest/posttest experimental design, the study showed that the intervention was efficacious in helping employees to develop greater PsyCap.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was part of a larger mixed methods design aimed at determining the efficacy of a work-site intervention in improving the PsyCap of employees. This design was chosen because it maximizes the strengths of both qualitative and quantitative methods while minimizing each of their weaknesses (Creswell and Plano Clark, 2007; Tashakkori and Teddlie, 1998). The specific mixed methods design implemented was the explanatory design using the participant selection model. This is a two-phase, sequential approach which began with a quantitative analysis and then drew upon those data to determine individuals who will be asked to participate in a follow-up study.

Findings

The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a work-site intervention on the participants’ PsyCap in determining its developmental capacity. Previous studies have demonstrated strong correlations between PsyCap and many of the positive outcomes managers and supervisors desire for their employees –high productivity, low absenteeism, positive organizational citizenship, etc. (Luthans et al., 2013; Youseff and Luthans, 2007). With the results of the present study showing significantly greater improvement for the treatment group than their counterparts in the comparison group, it demonstrates that PsyCap can be developed and, consequently, these positive outcomes can accessed by a focused work-site intervention.

Originality/value

This paper builds on work already being done but focuses on the following significant gap in the literature: Can PsyCap be developed using work-site interventions? This study provides a compelling answer to that question and thus pushes the study of POB forward in its development.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Jan Koch and Carsten C. Schermuly

In times of market volatility and uncertainty, finding effective strategies to attract and retain individuals continues to be a challenge for organizations. Based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

In times of market volatility and uncertainty, finding effective strategies to attract and retain individuals continues to be a challenge for organizations. Based on the psychological empowerment process (Spreitzer, 1996), this paper strives to examine if the application of agile project management could serve as such a strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

In two independent studies, the authors used an experiment with students as potential applicants (N = 121) and a field study with employees (N = 229) to test the predictive quality of agile project management for attracting individuals toward the organization.

Findings

Using structural equation modeling, the authors identified an indirect relationship between agile project management and attraction toward the organization via psychological empowerment. The authors found this relationship for potential applicants as well as employees. Furthermore, individuals high in sensation seeking are found to be more attracted toward organizations that apply agile project management than individuals low in sensation seeking.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contribute to the empowerment literature by establishing agile project management as a work structure that fosters feelings of psychological empowerment.

Practical implications

Taken together, these results suggest that agile project management can attract individuals who seek novel, complex and intense sensations. Where applicable, organizations may highlight their practice of agile project management methodologies as part of their employer brand to attract future specialists for agile projects.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to integrate the research streams on agile project management and attraction toward the organization using quantitative data.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Benjamin Dreer

To support student teachers' well-being and ensure that they flourish during teacher education, it is necessary to examine the relationship between student teachers and…

Abstract

Purpose

To support student teachers' well-being and ensure that they flourish during teacher education, it is necessary to examine the relationship between student teachers and their mentors during field experiences. Previous research has identified a connection between the quality of the mentor–mentee relationship and facets of student teachers' well-being. However, to date, this link has been insufficiently corroborated using longitudinal empirical data. This study aims to investigate the impact of mentor–mentee relationship quality on the well-being and flourishing of student teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-lagged panel design with two intervals (six weeks apart) was applied during a 15-week field experience with a sample of 125 German student teachers. Well-being and flourishing were captured using the positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, achievement (PERMA) framework. Relationship quality was assessed by adapting a questionnaire from the field of mentoring in medicine.

Findings

Relationship quality at the outset significantly predicted all five PERMA dimensions at the end of the assessment period. The impact of relationship quality was especially strong on the dimensions of relationships (R) and meaning (M). Conversely, the PERMA dimensions (except achievement) did not significantly impact relationship quality.

Originality/value

These results provide longitudinal empirical evidence underlining the beneficial effects of a healthy relationship between mentor and mentee in the field of teacher education. The findings clearly suggest that the relationship quality significantly influences student teachers' well-being and capacity to flourish during practical phases.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Anna Cooke and Kelly Fielding

This paper seeks to outline a theoretical argument for movement towards a positive, holistic approach to environmentalism, one aspect of which is to make environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to outline a theoretical argument for movement towards a positive, holistic approach to environmentalism, one aspect of which is to make environmental action more satisfying, interesting, and fun. The paper aims to identify new approaches and techniques for individual behaviour change that can explain and promote the broad lifestyle change needed.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐determination theory was applied to the problem of unsustainable resource consumption by Australian households. To achieve sustainable levels of Australian household carbon emissions, individuals will have to adopt and maintain high impact pro‐environmental behaviours across a number of behavioural domains.

Findings

It is hypothesised that motivation type will be a critical factor in bringing about personally sustainable changes. In particular, self‐determined (autonomous) motivation will be essential for generalisation of pro‐environmental behaviour. It is also proposed that supporting other psychological needs of relatedness and competence for environmental action will further enhance self‐determination for pro‐environmental behaviour. If these hypotheses are supported, the next challenge is to identify optimal ways of promoting autonomous behaviour change, drawing on, and expanding from self‐determination theory. Initial proposals for autonomy, competence, and relatedness supporting interventions are presented.

Practical implications

Changes achieved through the motivational approach have the potential to significantly impact household carbon footprints.

Originality/value

The paper moves away from incentive/punishment based approaches to changing pro‐environmental behaviour and provides a rationale for a new approach that focuses on supporting optimal motivation types for maintained and generalised pro‐environmental behaviour.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Paul Gibson and Silvia Seibold

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the role of marketing for luxury brands can be re-thought in order to ensure that such brands establish a strong connection…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the role of marketing for luxury brands can be re-thought in order to ensure that such brands establish a strong connection between their luxury image and positive social and environmental values.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based upon qualitative empirical research which informed a new categorisation of consumer motivations, through the application of self-determination theory which shows how concerns for environmental and social sustainability can be integrated with individual psychological needs.

Findings

The findings provide a deep understanding of consumers of luxury-eco products which could be used by marketing practitioners to shape socially responsible purchasing decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The research was designed for theory building, not theory-testing, so future research would be needed to study the efficacy of the recommended strategies for encouraging eco-luxury behaviour.

Practical implications

To increase the likelihood of practical applications, the authors follow the presentation of their findings with suggestions and examples for marketing to each of the consumer types identified by their research.

Social implications

The findings of this research have implications of a global, environmental and social kind. The societal adoption of eco-luxury consumption is about educating consumer desire, shifting it from its current focus on personal satisfaction, to a higher level of personal and social flourishing.

Originality/value

The findings effectively support the claims of self-determination theory by demonstrating how and why consumer motivations differ and how an improved sense of well-being can be achieved through internalised levels of self-determination.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Gary Gregory, Liem Ngo and Ryan Miller

The purpose of this study develops and validates a model of new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Drawing upon dual process theory, the model incorporates brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study develops and validates a model of new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Drawing upon dual process theory, the model incorporates brand salience and brand attitude as antecedents of brand choice intention, moderated by donor decision involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 generates measures using interviews with marketing, media and research managers, and new donors from two international aid and relief organizations. Study 2 uses an experimental design to first test scenarios of disaster relief, and then validate and confirm a new donor decision model using large-scale consumer panels for the international aid and relief sector in Australia.

Findings

The results replicated across four leading international aid-related charities reveal that brand salience is positively related to brand choice intention through the mediating effect of brand attitude. Furthermore, the effect of brand salience on brand choice intention is significantly stronger when donor decision involvement is low. Conversely, the effect of brand attitude on brand choice intention is stronger for higher levels of donor decision involvement.

Practical implications

Managers should understand the importance of brand salience/attitudes and the implications for the communication strategy. Managers should also strive to understand the level of decision involvement and the relative influence of brand attitude/salience on brand choice intention.

Originality/value

This study advances the literature on charitable giving by proposing and testing a moderated mediation model of donor choice when selecting a charity for donation. Findings provide new insights into the extent to which brand salience, brand attitude and donor decision-making influence how new donors choose between charities for donation.

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Norma D’Annunzio-Green and Allan Ramdhony

This paper aims to draw on the key tenets of self-determination theory (SDT) to explore the possibility of deploying talent management (TM) as an inherently motivational…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw on the key tenets of self-determination theory (SDT) to explore the possibility of deploying talent management (TM) as an inherently motivational process within the hospitality industry and examine the role of managers in leveraging it.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is rooted in social constructionism and uses qualitative methods and techniques to provide rich insights into employee perceptions and experiences of TM and related managerial attitudes and behaviours.

Findings

Although the current TM process is skewed towards performance outcomes, compelling evidence indicates variation in attempts to address employees’ motivational needs mediated by highly influential managerial attitudes and behaviours and importantly, suggests ample scope for embedding TM as an inherently motivational process.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a relatively small sample but can be extrapolated with moderation to the wider research context and other similar organisational settings.

Practical implications

The paper develops an operational framework which contains clear guidelines that can be effectively translated into practice keeping in view its potential benefits.

Social implications

In line with SDT, the study foregrounds the social and relational context conducive to TM as a motivational process.

Originality/value

The paper is the first of its kind to conceptualise TM as an inherently motivational process via the systematic application of SDT and offers early empirical insights into the phenomenon, which can serve as a solid platform for further research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Lillian T. Eby, Melissa M. Robertson and David B. Facteau

Interest in employee mindfulness has increased dramatically in recent years, fueled by several important conceptual articles, numerous studies documenting the benefits of…

Abstract

Interest in employee mindfulness has increased dramatically in recent years, fueled by several important conceptual articles, numerous studies documenting the benefits of mindfulness for employee outcomes, and the adoption of mindfulness-based practices in many Fortune 500 organizations. Despite this growing interest, the vast majority of research on employee mindfulness has taken an intrapersonal focus, failing to appreciate the ways in which mindfulness may enhance work-related relational processes and outcomes. The authors explore possible associations between mindfulness and relationally oriented workplace phenomena, drawing from interdisciplinary scholarship examining mindfulness in romantic relationships, child–parent relationships, patient–healthcare provider relationships, and student–teacher relationships. A framework is proposed that links mindfulness to three distinct relationally oriented processes, which are expected to have downstream effects on work-related relational outcomes. The authors then take the proposed framework and discuss possible extensions to a variety of unique workplace relationships and discuss critical next steps in advancing the relational science of mindfulness.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2008

Stephen J. Scanlan, Laurie Cooper Stoll and Kimberly Lumm

Hunger strikes have a long history in efforts to achieve social change but scholars have made few comparative, empirical, or theoretical contributions to understanding…

Abstract

Hunger strikes have a long history in efforts to achieve social change but scholars have made few comparative, empirical, or theoretical contributions to understanding their dynamics and connections in the social movement and nonviolent action literature. We examine hunger strikes from 1906 to 2004 with a comparative perspective, elaborating on its use as a tactic of nonviolent change. Using data assembled from the New York Times, Keesing's Worldwide Online, and The Economist we analyze how, when, where, and why hunger strikes occur, and by whom they have been utilized to seek change. In general, findings reveal that hunger strikes over the last century have been widespread phenomena that are typically small, brief, and relatively successful tactics against the state. Several themes emerge regarding hunger strikes including their appeal to the powerless and emergence when few political opportunities exist, their significance for third-party mobilization, and the role of emotions in the protest dynamics. Taken together, the power struggle involving the hunger strike is an important example and extension of “political jiu-jitsu” as presented by Sharp (1973).

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-892-3

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Christina Andrews

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework integrating theoretical insights, empirical research and practical advice emerging from public service motivation (PSM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework integrating theoretical insights, empirical research and practical advice emerging from public service motivation (PSM) and self-determination theory (SDT). It aims at demonstrating that, while PSM shows the relevance of public values for motivation, SDT explains how context affects it. Taking the two theoretical approaches as complementary to one another and by pointing out their “static” and “dynamic” features, the framework provides a theoretical foundation for organizational practices aimed at enhancing motivation in the public services.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is based on a review of PSM and SDT theoretical concepts and empirical studies; the analysis examines the implications and contributions of each approach to the understanding of motivation in the public services.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that PSM and SDT are complementary theoretical approaches and that this complementarity can provide clearer guidance to practitioners and widen the understanding of motivation in the public services.

Research limitations/implications

The framework considers only a few features pertaining motivation in the public services, such as public values, basic needs satisfaction, prosocial behaviour and socialization. Further research should explore additional factors.

Practical implications

The framework provides an explanation of why some practices are likely to enhance motivation in the public services, while others are likely to deplete it.

Originality/value

The framework does not limit itself to proposing the theoretical integration of PSM and SDT, but connects this integration to organizational practices.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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