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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2024

Patrice Silver, Juliann Dupuis, Rachel E. Durham, Ryan Schaaf, Lisa Pallett and Lauren Watson

In 2022, the Baltimore professional development school (PDS) partner schools, John Ruhruh Elementary/Middle School (JREMS) and Notre Dame of Maryland University (NDMU) received…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2022, the Baltimore professional development school (PDS) partner schools, John Ruhruh Elementary/Middle School (JREMS) and Notre Dame of Maryland University (NDMU) received funds through a Maryland Educational Emergency Revitalization (MEER) grant to determine (a) to what extent additional resources and professional development would increase JREMS teachers’ efficacy in technology integration and (b) to what extent NDMU professional development in the form of workshops and self-paced computer science modules would result in greater use of technology in the JREMS K-8 classrooms. Results indicated a statistically significant improvement in both teacher comfort with technology and integrated use of technology in instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected on teacher-stated comfort with technology before and after grant implementation. Teachers’ use of technology was also measured by unannounced classroom visits by administration before and after the grant implementation and through artifacts teachers submitted during NDMU professional development modules.

Findings

Results showing significant increases in self-efficacy with technology along with teacher integration of technology exemplify the benefits of a PDS partnership.

Originality/value

This initiative was original in its approach to teacher development by replacing required teacher professional development with an invitation to participate and an incentive for participation (a personal MacBook) that met the stated needs of teachers. Teacher motivation was strong because teammates in a strong PDS partnership provided the necessary supports to induce changes in teacher self-efficacy.

Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Dianne Chambers

This chapter describes assistive technology (AT) and inclusive education and examines the juncture where AT works to support the inclusion of students with disabilities in…

Abstract

This chapter describes assistive technology (AT) and inclusive education and examines the juncture where AT works to support the inclusion of students with disabilities in mainstream settings, including classrooms, home and community settings. AT consists of a range of devices and services which work to support students to augment existing abilities, compensate for or bypass difficulties they may experience. Some AT has been specifically developed for functional use, while other, particularly emerging technology, can be adapted for, or used, in an assistive capacity. Where the AT promotes social interaction, curriculum access and the ability to express understanding, there is the potential for heightened inclusion in the classroom.

Details

Assistive Technology to Support Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-520-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Chia-Ching Tsai, Yung-Kai Yang and Yu-Chi Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to examine how service failure affects customers’ negative response and how service recovery affects perceived justice in the context of different…

4267

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how service failure affects customers’ negative response and how service recovery affects perceived justice in the context of different relationship norms.

Design/methodology/approach

It includes four studies that examine how relationships influence customer reactions to service failures. In study 1, the paper examines how service failures affect customers’ negative reaction. In study 2, the paper examines how service recoveries influence perceived justice. Study 3 and study 4 test the robustness of the results of study 1 and study 2. All studies have a 2×2 between-subjects design.

Findings

The results show that individuals in exchange relationships experience a stronger feeling of betrayal than those in communal relationships during service failures. Further, individuals feel more betrayed and show greater negative responses during process failures. They perceive greater justice when offered physical recoveries, which, in turn, contributes to higher service-recovery satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in Taiwan. Customer reactions to service failures may vary according to cultural and environmental contexts.

Practical implications

Service providers are encouraged to cultivate relationships with customers and identify different types of customers to compensate them more effectively, according to their preferences.

Originality/value

This study introduces relationship norms to investigate consumer responses to service failures. The main contributions are twofold; it investigates the effect of relationship norms on customer responses to service-failure types and service-recovery types.

Details

Managing Service Quality, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

G.S. Sureshchandar, Chandrasekharan Rajendran and R.N. Anantharaman

The research literature on service quality has indeed swelled enormously over the past few years with numerous researchers administering various models across the world…

13560

Abstract

The research literature on service quality has indeed swelled enormously over the past few years with numerous researchers administering various models across the world. Nevertheless, the SERVQUAL instrument forms the basis on which all other works have been actualized. Interestingly, the conceptualization, measurement and applications of SERVQUAL across different industrial and commercial settings are not bereft of controversies either. A careful examination of the instrument divulges that the factors and the corresponding items are not comprehensive as it appears that the instrument has left out certain important constituents of service quality. In this background, the current research work strives to bring to light some of the critical determinants of service quality that have been overlooked in the literature and proposes a comprehensive model and an instrument framework for measuring customer perceived service quality. The instrument has been designed with specific reference to the banking sector. Data have been collected from customers of banks in a huge developing economy. The proposed instrument has been empirically tested for unidimensionality, reliability and construct validity using a confirmatory factor analysis approach. The present study offers a systematic procedure that could form the cornerstone for providing further insights on the conceptual and empirical comprehension of customer perceived service quality and its constituents.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Martin A. O’Neill, Paul Williams, Martin MacCarthy and Ronald Groves

Seeks to investigate the conceptualization and measurement of service quality and its importance to the dive tourism industry. It reports the findings from a recently conducted…

5965

Abstract

Seeks to investigate the conceptualization and measurement of service quality and its importance to the dive tourism industry. It reports the findings from a recently conducted study of dive tourist perceptions of service quality as they relate to a tour operator running tours on an artificial reef dive experience in Western Australia. The study also assesses the importance assigned by consumers to the various service quality attributes relative to those perceptions. The results are of significance to operators in that they identify clearly the managerial implications of providing a quality service during the dive tourism experience.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2016

Behzad Foroughi, Davoud Nikbin, Sunghyup Sean Hyun and Mohamad Iranmanesh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among the core product quality (team characteristics and player performance), emotion (anxiety, anger, dejection…

2464

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among the core product quality (team characteristics and player performance), emotion (anxiety, anger, dejection, happiness, and excitement), and the fans behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered on the team characteristics and player performance, emotions of anxiety, anger, dejection, happiness, and excitement using a survey from subjects comprised of 233 spectators attending Iranian Premier League soccer matches.

Findings

The results showed that both the core product quality dimensions of the team characteristics and player performance are related significantly to the negative emotion of anxiety and both positive emotions of excitement and happiness. Moreover, the positive emotions of excitement and happiness were positively related to the fan attendance, while the negative emotions of anxiety and dejection were negatively and significantly related to the fans behavioral intentions. The practical implications of the findings are discussed briefly.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information for sports marketing executives, suggesting that they strive for unique organizational advantages and employ them in their marketing messages when their teams are unsuccessful. Such a strategy can allow organizations to maximize the positive emotions of spectators in the face of poor core product quality.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Antonis Klidas, Peter T. van den Berg and Celeste P.M. Wilderom

This paper aims to test four potential predictors of the behavior of empowered employees during the delivery of service to customers.

16338

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test four potential predictors of the behavior of empowered employees during the delivery of service to customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire measuring employees' perceptions of training, performance‐related rewards, customer‐oriented culture, empowering management style, and empowered behavior was filled out by 356 frontline employees of 16 luxury hotels in seven European countries. These statistical analyses removed common‐method bias.

Findings

Results of regression analyses at the department level showed that two means of control – customer‐oriented culture and empowering management style – correlated significantly with empowered behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The survey tool would benefit from further refinement. Creative replications of the survey in different service or hotel settings may benefit service managers, consultants as well as consumers, ultimately.

Practical implications

A direct implication of this study's findings is that in luxury hotel service settings, enhancement to employee empowerment may be achieved through careful management and organizational development. If done well, service enhancements may be within reach.

Originality/value

In prior research, employee empowerment has been identified as an important means to increase customer satisfaction. The present study contributes to a greater and more specific understanding of how employee empowerment can be attained in luxury European hotels.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 February 2022

Niels van der Baan, Inken Gast, Wim Gijselaers and Simon Beausaert

The present study proposes coaching as a pedagogical intervention to prepare students for transitioning to the labour market. Taking a competence-based approach, the proposed…

3464

Abstract

Purpose

The present study proposes coaching as a pedagogical intervention to prepare students for transitioning to the labour market. Taking a competence-based approach, the proposed coaching practice aims to enhance students' employability competences to facilitate a smoother school-to-work transition. However, what transition coaching looks like remains largely unclear. Moreover, in competence-based education, teachers are expected to be highly skilled coaches, facilitating students' transition to the labour market. The present study aims to map the core competencies of a transition coach.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative design was adopted to map the core competences of a transition coach. Data were collected from two focus groups, consisting of coaches in higher education and in the workplace.

Findings

Results show that, to create the necessary support conditions, a coach creates a safe coaching environment and supports students in setting goals, guide them in the activities they undertake to attain these goals, and asks reflective questions. Moreover, the coach stimulates students' ownership by putting the student in the centre of the decision-making process. Furthermore, the results emphasize the importance of the coach's professional attitude and knowledge about the transition process and the labour market.

Practical implications

The article concludes with practical implications for novice transition coaches and teachers in higher education.

Originality/value

The present study adds to the agenda of graduate work readiness by proposing a coaching practice aimed at preparing students for their transition to the labour market.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 64 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 May 2021

Scott C Marley and M Jeanne Wilcox

This study examines family and peer academic social supports as correlates of academic motivation and first-semester GPA.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines family and peer academic social supports as correlates of academic motivation and first-semester GPA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a correlational design, 468 first-semester college students completed an online survey. Demographic characteristics, high school GPA and first-semester GPA were gathered from institutional data and linked to student survey responses.

Findings

Bivariate and multiple regression analyses revealed that family and peer academic social supports are predictive of academic motivation and first-semester GPA. The relationships identified were small- to medium-sized and of theoretical and substantive interest.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of the study are the measures are self-reported and the study is correlational, the latter limiting the strength of causal inferences. However, the study provides further understanding of the importance of college students' family and peer social supports in relationship to academic motivation and achievement.

Practical implications

The research has practical implications for higher educators developing programs to improve family and peer social support. If future research establishes causal relationships, interventions to enhance family and peer academic supports may prove beneficial in promoting academic motivation. Further, encouraging families to broadly discuss academic topics may be ineffective in terms of academic self-efficacy and achievement for historically underrepresented students.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to the literature by establishing relationships between family and peer supports with academic motivation. Statistical interactions between family and peer supports and with demographic characteristics in predicting academic motivation were identified. If the interactions are replicable, the findings provide avenues for future correlational and intervention research.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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