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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Terrance G. Weatherbee, Donna Sears and Ryan MacNeil

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the body of work featured in the International Journal of Wine Business Research (IJWBR) since its transition from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the body of work featured in the International Journal of Wine Business Research (IJWBR) since its transition from the International Journal of Wine Marketing (IJWM) in 2007, and to assess the collective evolution of the topical structure of published research against the Journal’s aims as described in the inaugural editorial.

Design/methodology/approach

A scientometric study using both network analysis and narrative methods was used to evaluate the research contents of the IJWBR.

Findings

Results lead to four conclusions. Overall, the research published in IJWBR has met the editorial aim of expanding beyond the marketing focus of IJWM. Second, the Journal has become increasingly international in its approach to research activities, both in terms of authorship and sites of study. Third, the methods used in the study of wine business have advanced from descriptive univariate to more complex or predictive multivariate approaches. Finally, despite all of these desired advances, research grounded in marketing and consumer behavior perspectives still predominates the Journal.

Originality/value

This is the first review of IJWBR to use a scientometric method; and this paper provides a description and assessment of progress made toward the publishing goals first envisioned for the Journal at its transition from IJWM to IJWBR.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Daniel J. O'Neil

The period from the death of Charles Stewart Parnell (1891) to the establishment of the Irish Free State (1922) was a momentous one for Ireland. There was a cultural…

Abstract

The period from the death of Charles Stewart Parnell (1891) to the establishment of the Irish Free State (1922) was a momentous one for Ireland. There was a cultural revitalization (1891– 1916), a Rising (1916), the Anglo‐Irish War (1919–21), the Treaty (1922), and the Civil War (1922–23) before the new Irish state settled into a routine pattern. This was a period characterized by assertive nationalism, dogmatism, and intolerance that led to violence and bloodshed. The result would be an independent Ireland, but a divided Ireland with potential for explosion in the North. Still there were people who surmounted the polemic of the moment and sought rational compromise and mutual tolerance. These were individuals who sought limited practical objectives, empathized with their adversaries, demonstrated civility, and often predicted the problems of the future. These were the “apostles of peace”. Among Ireland's many notables, three of such caliber stand out — Arthur Griffith, Horace Plunkett, and Eoin MacNeill. These men were intimately associated with the affairs of their day and were recognized for their integrity and professional accomplishment. They were also associated with the major peaceful attempts to solve Ireland's problems and avoid the warfare that ensued. Griffith, the journalist, founded the early Sinn Fein and came temporarily to lead the Irish Free State. Plunkett, the Anglo‐Irish aristocrat, founded the cooperative movement. MacNeill, the civil servant and historian, was involved in starting the Gaelic League and the Irish Volunteers. These were the “apostles of peace” and Ireland's subsequent trauma stemmed from their limited number. The objective of this study is to examine the careers of these three exceptional notables and ascertain if there exist some pattern. Are there generalizations that might be made about them collectively?

Details

Humanomics, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Ryan MacNeil and Britanie Wentzell

Although a great deal has been written about the challenges and opportunities for collaboration between librarians and professors in higher education, most recommendations…

Abstract

Although a great deal has been written about the challenges and opportunities for collaboration between librarians and professors in higher education, most recommendations for faculty–library collaboration are written by librarians, published in librarian-oriented venues, and rely on second-hand accounts of professorial perceptions and experiences. Dialogue between librarians and professors is missing. In this chapter, the authors present a duoethnographic inquiry into a librarian–professor collaboration: the authors collaboratively examine their four years working together on the senior seminar course “Small Business Management” at Acadia University, Canada. In considering the evolution of their course and their collaboration, the authors reflect on six dimensions of their experiences: the way their collaboration has shaped the course learning outcomes, the value the authors have derived from collaboratively reflexive teaching, the workload tensions the authors have navigated, the challenge of “fitting in,” and the role of library champion. The authors then conclude with four insights from their professorial–librarian collaboration that might be transferable to other contexts of higher education: the importance of openness, collegiality, time for collaboration, and attention to the cultural gaps between professorship and librarianship.

Details

International Perspectives on Improving Student Engagement: Advances in Library Practices in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-453-8

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Abstract

Details

Contesting Institutional Hegemony in Today’s Business Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-341-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Abstract

Details

International Perspectives on Improving Student Engagement: Advances in Library Practices in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-453-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2016

Abstract

Details

Contesting Institutional Hegemony in Today’s Business Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-341-2

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2016

Abstract

Details

Contesting Institutional Hegemony in Today’s Business Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-341-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Abstract

Details

International Perspectives on Improving Student Engagement: Advances in Library Practices in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-453-8

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Enakshi Sengupta, Patrick Blessinger and Milton D. Cox

We are living in an electronic age, where everything that we want to know or are curious about is increasingly facilitated by the internet and search engines. Now, much of…

Abstract

We are living in an electronic age, where everything that we want to know or are curious about is increasingly facilitated by the internet and search engines. Now, much of the world’s knowledge is at our fingertips. Students have unlimited access to information in the form of e-books, journals and other open sources. The value of a physical repository of knowledge is diminishing and the printing of material is becoming less compelling. It has been noted that college students spend as much time on the internet as they do while studying (Jones, 2002). The most pertinent question is whether the library is still considered an important source of information to students? Can we imagine a university without a library with just computers and a server room? The information highway is posing new challenges that the librarians have to deal with (Dunn, 2002; Rockman & Smith, 2002). In the past, gatekeepers like the librarian decided what a student should read, depending on their level of study and their comprehension power. The picture has altered and now students decide what exactly they should read with the click of their computers. Leaders in higher education institutions are skeptical as to how much they should actually invest in buying books, how many shelves to create to stack them and whether the collection of books is going to be an indicator of the academic quality of that institution. This book talks about a vital subject as to how much and in what ways a library can engage a student to create information literacy. Various interventions have been discussed as case studies in colleges and universities from Canada to India. Student-centered workshops have been designed along with university partnerships with a writing center as well as the role of a library as a source of socio-economic transformation in Africa. The experiences shared by the authors in this book will be a valuable resource for librarians across the world as they increase their collaborative efforts to promote the value of information literacy for students.

Details

International Perspectives on Improving Student Engagement: Advances in Library Practices in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-453-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Hatice Aydin, Zeliha Eser and Sezer Korkmaz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the arousal of negative consumer emotions as a consequence of fast food consumption among individuals with restrained food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the arousal of negative consumer emotions as a consequence of fast food consumption among individuals with restrained food consumption. Furthermore, a moderating effect of socio-cultural pressure to buffer these relationships is positioned for the first time.

Design/methodology/approach

The field study is completed with data collected through an online survey among 353 customers by employing a random sampling technique. The collected data are analyzed through confirmatory factor analysis procedures.

Findings

The hypotheses related to the effects of fast food consumption on body image guilt and shame, body image guilt on planning diet and shame, moderator role of socio-cultural, in terms of shame, are accepted.

Research limitations/implications

A key limitation is data collected from individuals with restrained food consumption in Turkey which limits the generalizability of results to other countries and contexts.

Practical implications

The results call for paying attention to socio-cultural pressures that enhance shame.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this paper lies in the fact that fast food consumption is scantly related to the arousal of negative consumer emotions. Furthermore, moderating effects of social pressures and Turkish context are also unique to this study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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