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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Ruwini Edirisinghe and Jin Woo

Effective use of post-occupancy evaluation (POE) data – quantitative physical measurements and qualitative occupants’ perceptions are limited due to practical challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective use of post-occupancy evaluation (POE) data – quantitative physical measurements and qualitative occupants’ perceptions are limited due to practical challenges and research gaps. Although building information modelling (BIM) has enabled a paradigm shift in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industries, its use in facility management (FM) is still infancy. Limited research has used building performance data to enable changes to BIM models for the benefit of FM. This paper aims to propose the innovative process to collect and contextualize two fragmented types of POE data sets by filling methodological gap in POE research. Moreover, it presents innovative modelling techniques to facilitate BIM as a more effective platform to visualize such currently fragmented data sets in real-time while enabling a decision-making model to benefit facility managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a process of capturing cloud-based POE data, both wireless sensor network-based physical measurement data and mobile app-based occupant perception data. Real-time capture and visualization of such building performance data was demonstrated through a pilot data collection. Subsequently, the innovative visualization of the cloud connected data is supported by a prototype game engine-based BIM model.

Findings

Cloud-based POE data, both quantitative physical measurements and qualitative occupants’ reported perceptions, can be effectively used in FM practice with the use of innovative data capture and visualization techniques in a beneficial manner for facility operation and management decisions. This paper also demonstrates the ability of BIM to serve as a “single source of truth” to support post-construction building performance data.

Originality/value

While addressing a number of research gaps, the paper provides a holistic approach to BIM-based performance monitoring for smart FM to achieve the ultimate vision of BIM enabled FM. The innovative system is expected to provide a powerful and practical tool for data collection, analysis and visualization for intelligent facility management decision making. This paper contributes to fill an important research and practice gap in the area of next generation smart building management practices.

Details

Facilities, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Ruwini Edirisinghe, Kerry Anne London, Pushpitha Kalutara and Guillermo Aranda-Mena

Building information modelling (BIM) is increasingly being adopted during construction projects. Design and construction practices are adjusting to the new system. BIM is…

3534

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) is increasingly being adopted during construction projects. Design and construction practices are adjusting to the new system. BIM is intended to support the entire project life-cycle: the design and construction phases, and also facility management (FM). However, BIM-enabled FM remains in its infancy and has not yet reached its full potential. The purpose of this paper is to identify major aspects of BIM in order to derive a fully BIM-enabled FM process.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 207 papers were classified into main and subordinate research areas for quantitative analysis. These findings were then used to conceptualise a BIM-enabled FM framework grounded by innovation diffusion theory for adoption, and for determining the path of future research.

Findings

Through an extensive literature review, the paper summarises many benefits and challenges. Major aspects of BIM are identified in order to describe a BIM-enabled FM implementation process grounded by innovation diffusion theory. The major research areas of the proposed framework include: planning and guidelines; value realisation; internal leadership and knowledge; procurement; FM; specific application areas; data capture techniques; data integration; knowledge management; and legal and policy impact. Each element is detailed and is supported by literature. Finally, gaps are highlighted for investigation in future research.

Originality/value

This paper systematically classifies and evaluates the existing research, thus contributing to the achievement of the ultimate vision of BIM-enabled FM. The proposed framework informs facility managers, and the BIM-enabled FM implementation process. Further, the holistic survey identifies gaps in the body of knowledge, revealing avenues for future research.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2018

Ruwini Edirisinghe

The future construction site will be pervasive, context aware and embedded with intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to explore and define the concept of the digital…

15070

Abstract

Purpose

The future construction site will be pervasive, context aware and embedded with intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to explore and define the concept of the digital skin of the future smart construction site.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a systematic and hierarchical classification of 114 articles from both industry and academia on the digital skin concept and evaluates them. The hierarchical classification is based on application areas relevant to construction, such as augmented reality, building information model-based visualisation, labour tracking, supply chain tracking, safety management, mobile equipment tracking and schedule and progress monitoring. Evaluations of the research papers were conducted based on three pillars: validation of technological feasibility, onsite application and user acceptance testing.

Findings

Technologies learned about in the literature review enabled the envisaging of the pervasive construction site of the future. The paper presents scenarios for the future context-aware construction site, including the construction worker, construction procurement management and future real-time safety management systems.

Originality/value

Based on the gaps identified by the review in the body of knowledge and on a broader analysis of technology diffusion, the paper highlights the research challenges to be overcome in the advent of digital skin. The paper recommends that researchers follow a coherent process for smart technology design, development and implementation in order to achieve this vision for the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

James Charlton, Kenneth Kelly, David Greenwood and Leo Moreton

The adoption of building information modelling (BIM) in managing built heritage is an exciting prospect, but one that presents complexities additional to those of modern…

Abstract

Purpose

The adoption of building information modelling (BIM) in managing built heritage is an exciting prospect, but one that presents complexities additional to those of modern buildings. If challenges can be identified and overcome, the adoption of historic BIM (HBIM) could offer efficiencies in how heritage buildings are managed.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Durham Cathedral as a case study, we present the workflows applied to create an asset information model to improve the way this unique UNESCO World Heritage Site is managed, and in doing so, set out the challenges and complexities in achieving an HBIM solution.

Findings

This study identifies the need for a better understanding of the distinct needs and context for managing historic assets, and the need for heritage information requirements (HIR) that reflect this.

Originality/value

This study presents first-hand findings based on a unique application of BIM at Durham Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The study provides a better understanding of the challenges and drivers of HBIM adoption across the heritage sector and underlines the need for information requirements that are unique to historical buildings/assets to deliver a coherent and relevant HBIM approach.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Helen Lingard, Nick Blismas, James Harley, Andrew Stranieri, Rita Peihua Zhang and Payam Pirzadeh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential to use infographics to capture, represent and communicate important information to construction designers, such that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential to use infographics to capture, represent and communicate important information to construction designers, such that it improves their ability to understand the implications of design choices for construction workers’ health and safety.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on information obtained through a photographic Q-sort, supplemented with a literature review, health and safety information related to the design of a façade was collected from subject matter experts. This information was used to develop infographics representing the subject matter knowledge. A facilitated workshop was then held with 20 design professionals to engage them in a hazard identification process using a case study scenario. The designers were provided with the infographics and asked to comment upon how the infographics changed their assessments of the health and safety risks inherent in the case study building design. A sub-set of participants was interviewed to explore their perceptions of the impact and usefulness of the inforgraphics.

Findings

Infographics were developed at different levels of detail, representing potential health and safety issues associated with the site location and surroundings, the construction site environment and the detailed façade design. Workshop participants identified a number of potential health and safety issues associated with the case study scenario. However, this number increased substantially once they had viewed the infographic. Further, the health and safety issues identified when participants had access to the infographic were more likely to be less visible issues, relating to ergonomic hazards, procurement or the organisation and sequencing of work. The workshop participants who were interviewed described how the infographics enabled them to make a more global assessment of the health and safety implications of the case study building design because it helped them to understand the design in the physical construction site context. Participants also favoured the visual nature of the infographics and suggested that this format may be particularly useful to communicate important health and safety information to novice designers with limited on-site experience.

Research limitations/implications

The infographics developed in this research were relatively simple two-dimensional representations produced and presented in hard copy format. It is possible that more sophisticated forms of infographic could have produced different results. Thus, it is important that future research develops different types of infographics and rigorously evaluates their effectiveness in developing designers’ health and safety-related knowledge and improving decision making.

Practical implications

The results indicate that simple infographics can help design professionals to better understand the health and safety implications of design decisions in the context of the construction site environment. In particular, the infographics appear to have increased designers’ ability to recognize less visible health and safety-related issues. The designers interviewed also described the potential usefulness of the infographics in design workshops as a tool to stimulate discussion and develop a shared understanding of the health and safety aspects of a particular design decision or choice.

Originality/value

The value of the research lies in the development and evaluation of infographics as a tool supports the integration of health and safety into design decision making. The potential to develop these tools into digital or web-based resources is also significant.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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