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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Ruth Tait

Reports the conclusions of a study involving in‐depth interviews with 18 business leaders, focusing on the qualities and skills they felt to be essential for success in…

Abstract

Reports the conclusions of a study involving in‐depth interviews with 18 business leaders, focusing on the qualities and skills they felt to be essential for success in directing and guiding a large organization. These qualities include the ability to make sense of a complicated pattern of events and from this formulate clear goals for the organization; people and communication skills; integrity; drive and ambition. In selecting others, as potential future leaders and high‐flyers, this group of current leaders used the following criteria. There was high agreement that proven track record was vital, both as an indicator of future performance and to establish credibility. Another important characteristic is the ability to take an independent (even unpopular) line, and defend it. As could be predicted, interpersonal skills, team orientation, commitment and motivation were also seen as important.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Emily A. Prifogle

This chapter uses the historian’s method of micro-history to rethink the significance of the Supreme Court decision Muller v. Oregon (1908). Muller is typically considered

Abstract

This chapter uses the historian’s method of micro-history to rethink the significance of the Supreme Court decision Muller v. Oregon (1908). Muller is typically considered a labor law decision permitting the regulation of women’s work hours. However, this chapter argues that through particular attention to the specific context in which the labor dispute took place – the laundry industry in Portland, Oregon – the Muller decision and underlying conflict should be understood as not only about sex-based labor rights but also about how the labor of laundry specifically involved race-based discrimination. This chapter investigates the most important conflicts behind the Muller decision, namely the entangled histories of white laundresses’ labor and labor activism in Portland, as well as the labor of their competitors – Chinese laundrymen. In so doing, this chapter offers an intersectional reading of Muller that incorporates regulations on Chinese laundries and places the decision in conversation with a long line of anti-Chinese laundry legislation on the West Coast, including that at issue in Yick Wo v. Hopkins (1886).

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Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-297-1

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Book part
Publication date: 15 May 2018

Crystal Abidin

Abstract

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Internet Celebrity: Understanding Fame Online
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-079-6

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Stephen Parker, Frances Dark, Gabrielle Vilic, Karen McCann, Ruth O'Sullivan, Caroline Doyle and Bernice Lendich

A novel integrated staffing model for community-based residential rehabilitation services is described. The purpose of this paper is to achieve synergistic gains through…

Abstract

Purpose

A novel integrated staffing model for community-based residential rehabilitation services is described. The purpose of this paper is to achieve synergistic gains through meaningful integration of peer support and clinical workers within rehabilitation teams. Key features include the majority of roles within the team being held by persons with a lived experience of mental illness, the active collaboration between peer and clinical workers throughout all stages of a consumer’s rehabilitation journey, and an organizational structure that legitimizes and emphasizes the importance of peer work within public mental health service delivery. This staffing model is not anticipated to alter the core rehabilitation function and service models.

Design/methodology/approach

The emergence of the integrated staffing model is described with reference to the policy and planning context, the evidence base for peer support, and the organizational setting. A conceptual and contextualized description of the staffing model in practice as compared to a traditional clinical staffing model is provided.

Findings

There is a potential for synergistic benefits through the direct collaboration between horizontally integrated peer and clinical specialists within a unified team working toward a common goal. This staffing model is novel and untested, and will be subjected to ongoing evaluation.

Originality/value

The integrated staffing model may provide a pathway to achieving valued and valuable roles for peer workers working alongside clinical staff in providing rehabilitation support to people affected by serious mental illness.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1961

The war between formidable rivals for the use of the word “Champagne” continues. It began in 1958 at the Old Bailey with a prosecution brought under the Merchandise Marks…

Abstract

The war between formidable rivals for the use of the word “Champagne” continues. It began in 1958 at the Old Bailey with a prosecution brought under the Merchandise Marks Act alleging the application of a false description, viz., “Spanish Champagne” to goods and a second charge of applying the false description “champagne.” For the prosecution it was stated that “champagne” could only come from the Champagne district of France, which in 1921 the French Government had officially established and limited as the sole area for the production of champagne. Such a description applied to a Spanish wine, therefore, was false and misleading. The prosecution failed. The judge had stated there was overwhelming evidence of wines having lost the territorial origin of their names.

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British Food Journal, vol. 63 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1900

In the preceding rules the individual biographical entry has been ignored, as it lends itself to more convenient treatment apart. Collective biography is, of course, in no…

Abstract

In the preceding rules the individual biographical entry has been ignored, as it lends itself to more convenient treatment apart. Collective biography is, of course, in no way different from the ordinary book ; and the same is to be said of autobiography. Owing to the change of form in the individual biographical entry, due to the author yielding in importance to the biographee, it is usual to separate collective and individual biography in the catalogue, whether this is done on the shelves or not. Individual biography might be further separated in the catalogue into autobiographical and non‐auto‐biographical, though I cannot recall any instance where this has been carried out. In any case, it is important to distinguish in some clear way, between the subject name and the name of the author. Mere position is hardly enough ; there should be a distinction in the type. Whatever type has been employed in the other parts for author should be retained for author in the individual biograhical entry, and the subject name should be in a different type. If the author is printed in a black‐face type, as suggested in these rules, the best type for the subject name will be small capitals, as :—

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New Library World, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 58 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1970

I suppose that most noticeable of all the changes in our profession since I came into it has been the multiplicity of the methods by which one can become a librarian. A…

Abstract

I suppose that most noticeable of all the changes in our profession since I came into it has been the multiplicity of the methods by which one can become a librarian. A. E. Standley says in a recent article in the L.A.R., in 1970: “The term librarian includes the Library Association chartered librarian, the graduate with a degree in librarianship, the scholar librarian, the information and intelligence officer, the translator, the abstracter, the non‐library‐qualified subject expert”.

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New Library World, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1973

THE proposed new central library for Portsmouth, for which the foundation stone was laid by the Lord Mayor at the beginning of December, looks from its plans to be a…

Abstract

THE proposed new central library for Portsmouth, for which the foundation stone was laid by the Lord Mayor at the beginning of December, looks from its plans to be a satisfying building, of architectural interest, which incorporates admirably up‐to‐date ideas of reader service and staff needs.

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New Library World, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1906

THE first of the Islington Public Libraries, opened on September 21st, has proved a phenomenal success, and, at the same time, has thrown an interesting light on several…

Abstract

THE first of the Islington Public Libraries, opened on September 21st, has proved a phenomenal success, and, at the same time, has thrown an interesting light on several modern theories in librarianship. It is, as our readers know, the fust of a system of five libraries, towards the erection of which Dr. Carnegie has given £40,000. The building itself is, as many librarians had an opportunity of judging at the “private view” described in our last number, of an exceedingly well‐lighted and attractive character. The arrangement and accommodation provided present several novel features. On the ground floor, opening from the Central Hall, is the Children's Lending Library and Reading Room. This is stocked with about 3,000 volumes for lending purposes, including French and German juvenile literature, and the reading room portion has seating accommodation for about a hundred children. A representative selection of children's magazines are displayed here, and there are special study‐tables for girls and boys equipped with suitable reference collections. A feature of this room is a striking dado of pictures illustrating scenes from English history, which goes far to make the room interesting and attractive.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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