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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Kate Worsfold, Ron Fisher, Ruth McPhail, Mark Francis and Andrew Thomas

This research investigates employee and guest satisfaction, guests’ perceptions of value and their intention to return. Considered are hotel workers’ job satisfaction, how…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates employee and guest satisfaction, guests’ perceptions of value and their intention to return. Considered are hotel workers’ job satisfaction, how job satisfaction impacts guests’ satisfaction with the service experience and with the physical attributes of the hotel and how these variables affect perceived value and intention to return.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling is used to analyze data from a large global hotel chain.

Findings

Guest satisfaction with service and the physical attributes of the hotel differentially impact guest outcomes of intention to return and perceptions of value. Key findings are guest satisfaction with the physical attributes of a hotel is significantly more strongly linked to guests’ intention to return than is satisfaction with service received. Staff job satisfaction is significantly linked to guests being more satisfied with the service experience and their return intentions. Of all the factors directly contributing to guests’ return intentions, guest satisfaction with the physical attributes of the hotel was largest in impact. In contrast guest satisfaction with service is linked to guests’ perceptions of value, whereas satisfaction with the physical aspects is not significant. Guests’ perceptions of value do not impact intention to return.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted within one global hotel chain, which due to its cross-sectional nature may possibly be a limitation. However, its single organizational nature does not diminish the importance of the findings.

Practical implications

Hotel managers need to consider the importance of the physical attributes of properties in what has been largely a services-dominated debate. What guests value may not lead to repeat business.

Originality/value

Providing excellent customer service may not be the main motivation for return business. Also, holistic measures of guest satisfaction may not accurately measure what guests value. Perceived value is not a significant predictor of intention to return.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Ruth McPhail, Ben French and Keithia Wilson

The purpose of this study was to improve the orientation experience of commencing first-year undergraduate business students to better prepare them for the reality of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to improve the orientation experience of commencing first-year undergraduate business students to better prepare them for the reality of their academic studies through the development and implementation of a Commencing Student-Needs-Centred Orientation Framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of this study used survey analysis and focus groups to explore low orientation efficacy scores from the cohort and resulted in a reconceptualisation and restructure of the existing orientation programme. The new programme was completed and implemented, and student’s perceptions remeasured. Evaluation was performed using sources of data across three semesters.

Findings

Intervention success is demonstrated across three semesters by sustained and continuously improving orientation efficacy scores. Overall, student orientation efficacy improved by 19.6 per cent in the first implementation (B, n = 44), and an improvement of 22.8 per cent was seen in the third semester (C, n = 177), when compared to the first semester (A, n = 164).

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation of this study is that the exploratory framework was applied and evaluated only within a single discipline of business, and in one Australian university with a predominantly first-generation student population.

Practical implications

The paper is a guide for the design of an orientation day programme informed by an evidence-based framework identifying the transition needs of commencing students entering higher education, which is tested for its efficacy in preparing students for their academic role, and for success.

Originality/value

Orientation is an important, yet under-researched aspect of engagement and retention in today’s universities.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Michael C.G. Davidson, Ruth McPhail and Shane Barry

This paper aims to review the past, current and future trends in human resource management (HRM) in the hospitality industry, with a specific focus on large international…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the past, current and future trends in human resource management (HRM) in the hospitality industry, with a specific focus on large international hotels. The setting of this review is within the context of general HRM theory development.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a detailed review of the literature, background, issues and trends in HRM. It moves from the generic HR review to examine the hospitality industry and specific identifiable trends and issues. Additionally, personal communication with senior industry executives is used to highlight specific areas.

Findings

Issues of training and skills development and of service quality are as important in the future as in the past. Technology is now set to revolutionise the way HRM is conducted. Generational change and how Generations X and Y view work require new approaches for HRM. Casualisation and outsourcing will become more dominant methods of employment. Strategic human resource management (SHRM) and its practices have the flexibility to add value to future hospitality firm performance. The future of HRM in the hospitality industry will need to take into account the various trends but will also be influenced by local circumstances.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper based on a review of literature that addresses a large area of both generic and hospitality HRM, and focuses on a specific section of the hospitality industry: large international hotels.

Practical implications

The paper provides a basis for understanding how the various HRM trends are developing, and addresses the steps required to meet future challenges in the industry.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is in its identification and analysis of the major trends in HRM and the implications these hold for the future of the hospitality industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Ron Fisher, Ruth McPhail, Emily You and Maria Ash

– The purpose of the paper is to investigate if, and to what degree, social media are used for the recruitment of global supply chain managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to investigate if, and to what degree, social media are used for the recruitment of global supply chain managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that discusses how organizations should engage with social media platforms for effective recruitment of global supply chain managers.

Findings

Findings are that organizations seeking to employ global supply chain managers, particularly those engaged in B2B activities, lag other industry sectors in adopting new ways of recruiting talent. Building on the findings, we present models of how organizations should move to adopt web-based technologies and the steps needed to engage fully in using social media to recruit global supply chain managers.

Research limitations/implications

Global supply chains (including logistics) lag other industry sectors in adopting social media networks for recruitment, and risk missing out on talent if the issues are not addressed. Serious consideration needs to be given, particularly by B2B but also by B2C businesses, in order to attract suitable employees. Employees’ and prospective employees’ expectations will increasingly revolve around the use of social media.

Originality/value

The research is original in that it investigates an emerging, contemporaneous issue that is of considerable importance in recruiting global supply chain managers. The research provides value by highlighting that in recruiting global supply chain managers, organizations have been slow to adopt new technologies, and recommends actions to remedy this.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Ruth McPhail, Anoop Patiar, Carmel Herington, Peter Creed and Michael Davidson

– The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a self-reporting tool: the hospitality employee’ satisfaction index.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a self-reporting tool: the hospitality employee’ satisfaction index.

Design/methodology/approach

The 15-item instrument presented in this study was developed through an examination of the extant literature and seven focus groups representing the hospitality industry. The instrument was piloted online with 1,000 hospitality employees, refined and then distributed online to 9,000 hospitality employees.

Findings

Factor analysis extracted three factors (career advancement, control and variety and relationships), and reliability analysis (Cronbach’s alpha) indicated high internal consistency. A stepwise multiple regression revealed that the control and variety factor related most strongly to overall job satisfaction, followed by relationships and career advancement factors, confirming that in the context of the hospitality industry, these factors were important in the measurement of job satisfaction. Control and variety was significantly related to the intention to stay in the job, and career advancement and control and variety were related to the intention to stay in the hospitality industry.

Research limitations/implications

The data were gathered in Australia and were tested nationally to support the robustness of the instrument. Therefore, the hospitality industry can use this instrument as a generic index to evaluate the job satisfaction levels of employees.

Originality/value

This specifically designed hospitality job satisfaction instrument can be used to evaluate the job satisfaction of employees at all levels and can be used in the development of a benchmark. This index is the first of its kind to be tested in the broader hospitality context, including accommodation, restaurants, coffee shops, fast food, clubs, hotels, convention, sporting venues, catering and institutional catering.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Michael Harvey, James B. Shaw, Ruth McPhail and Anthony Erickson

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was developed around the present relevant secondary data.

Findings

The key findings of the paper were that deans were being replaced due to the difference in expectation of the various constituents (e.g. students, faculty, administration, parents) in the performance of the SBA.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study were not providing primary data to support the theory based hypotheses of the study.

Practical implications

Deans need to recognize that there will be conflicting expectations relative to the performance of the dean and that deans have a very short time to effectuate change in academic organizations.

Social implications

Not having such high turnover in dean's positions should provide the stability of management to bring about change need in institutions of higher education.

Originality/value

Identification of key mistakes made by deans as well as the mistakes made by faculty undermine the performance of deans.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Many major industries continue to feel the effect of the prevailing economic uncertainty. But tourism, hospitality and leisure is one sector showing signs of being able to buck this unwelcome trend. The number of international tourists is no longer falling and significant expansion is evident in China, India and other developing nations. Growth invariably heightens competition though and it's no different here. This situation applies to multinational organizations and smaller domestic companies alike. Regardless of size, operators must therefore meet existing and new challenges in order to succeed. In an industry like this, such a comprehensive set of demands places an organization's human resource management (HRM) firmly under the spotlight.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Haozhe Chen

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Michael A. Katovich and Ronald Burns

This paper describes the home run as a dramatic offensive accomplishment in baseball linked to the five dramaturgical dimensions (act, scene, agent, agency, and purpose…

Abstract

This paper describes the home run as a dramatic offensive accomplishment in baseball linked to the five dramaturgical dimensions (act, scene, agent, agency, and purpose) defined by Burke. Such an accomplishment also pertains to two types of social pasts – categorical and crystallized – that can serve as correlates to the five dramaturgical dimensions. Owing to its dramaturgical and temporal significance, the home run symbolizes a celebrated sign of prowess that contributes to a home run hitter's or slugger's rarified status. Further, as a dramaturgical moment, the home run calls forth specified responses (especially on the part of announcers) that contribute to its distinctive meaning in the game.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-931-9

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Deana A. Rohlinger, Rebecca A. Redmond, Haley Gentile, Tara Stamm and Alexandra Olsen

This study uses the concept of standing, or legitimacy, to bridge the disciplinary divide between social movement and communication scholarship on activism. Here, the…

Abstract

This study uses the concept of standing, or legitimacy, to bridge the disciplinary divide between social movement and communication scholarship on activism. Here, the authors examine whether activist standing in 269 broadcast news stories sampled between 1970 and 2012 across five social movements – Women’s Rights, Gay Rights, Immigrant Rights, Occupy Wall Street, and Tea Party – is undermined by (1) the mix of visuals included in media coverage and (2) activists’ social statuses at the intersection of gender, race, and age. The authors find that broadcast media undercut the standing of activists in some social movements more than others. Occupy activists faced the most challenges to their standing because they were more likely to be shown as angry, young protestors wearing anti-government costumes and engaged in nonnormative protest behavior than activists associated with other movements. In contrast, Tea Party movement activists, who also made anti-government claims during the same relative time frame, were not cast in a similarly negative light. The authors also find that activist standing is diminished and enhanced at the intersection of gender, race, and age. For example, the social movements with the most racial diversity – the immigrant rights and Occupy movements – were also shown as the most deviant and deserving violent repression in coverage. The authors conclude the study with a discussion of the importance of interdisciplinary research and a call for additional research on the movement–media relationship.

Details

Media and Power in International Contexts: Perspectives on Agency and Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-455-2

Keywords

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