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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Ruth Banomyong and Puthipong Julagasigorn

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework on how strategic philanthropy can be included in humanitarian supply chains delivery. This framework explains the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework on how strategic philanthropy can be included in humanitarian supply chains delivery. This framework explains the modalities where strategic philanthropy can be successful when collaborating with key humanitarian supply chain actors.

Design/methodology/approach

A philanthropy delivery framework is developed based on the literature related to strategic philanthropy and humanitarian supply chains. The delivery framework is further validated with the real-life case study of a multinational firm during the 2011 Thai floods.

Findings

Procter and Gamble (P&G) was involved in the Thailand flood 2011 relief efforts in three phases: preparation, immediate response, and reconstruction phase. The company supported and distributed a water purifier through a non-governmental relief agency, the Princess Pa Foundation, under the Thai Red Cross Society, that enabled P&G to not only gain the trust of the targeted community during all the phases but in the continued usage of their water purifier after the event. Community leaders and P&G’s modern trade retailers played an important role in collaborating in this humanitarian supply chain to enable the successful delivery and usage of the donated water purifier.

Research limitations/implications

This proposed delivery framework is appropriate for in-kind products and services philanthropy. The case study describes how strategic philanthropy can be implemented in a specific case, i.e. flood disaster.

Practical implications

Academia, practitioners, and companies who are involved in humanitarian reliefs may adopt and adapt this framework in order to enable a win-win situation for all stakeholders in the humanitarian supply chain.

Originality/value

The delivery framework suggests that firms can develop successful strategic philanthropy through systematic humanitarian supply chain collaboration. It explains how a company can operate its philanthropic programs through collaboration with others as well as describes how these different actors can work together.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Ruth Banomyong, Puthipong Julagasigorn, Paitoon Varadejsatitwong and Pairach Piboonrungroj

An understanding of the “AS-IS” stage of a relief operation is the basis for further action in humanitarian supply chain management. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

An understanding of the “AS-IS” stage of a relief operation is the basis for further action in humanitarian supply chain management. The purpose of this paper is to develop a toolbox called the Humanitarian Supply Chain Assessment Tool (HumSCAT). This toolbox is comprised of a set of basic tools which can be classified into each phase of disaster relief.

Design/methodology/approach

The HumSCAT is proposed by paralleling frequently used tools in commercial supply chains with the objectives and characteristics of relief phases. A case study was used to validate the HumSCAT along with six tools provided in the preparation phase.

Findings

The HumSCAT consists of seven tools in the preparation phase, nine tools in the response phase and ten tools in the recovery phase. The case study illustrates how to use the HumSCAT and the six tools. The latter were found to be useful for improving the relief chain.

Research limitations/implications

The list of tools is not exclusive. Other tools might be applicable as long as they meet the objectives and characteristics of the phase. A tool should be adjusted accordingly to the contexts. Tools in other phases should be validated in future research.

Practical implications

The HumSCAT may serve as a reference toolbox for practitioners. Its output can be used for further designing of the “TO-BE” status of humanitarian relief chains.

Originality/value

The HumSCAT is proposed as a toolbox for academics and practitioners involved in humanitarian supply chains.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Narath Bhusiri, Ruth Banomyong, Puthipong Julagasigorn, Paitoon Varadejsatitwong and Nirpa Dhami

The impact of supply disruptions from unplanned events can cause goods shortage, limited responsiveness and high opportunity cost thus compromising development aid…

Abstract

Purpose

The impact of supply disruptions from unplanned events can cause goods shortage, limited responsiveness and high opportunity cost thus compromising development aid programmes' achievement targets. These situations force humanitarian aid agencies to develop new strategies for effectively managing their supplies. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the foundation of humanitarian supply chain resilience through the development of an adapted Kraljic portfolio model.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research was used to adapt and validate the Kraljic portfolio model to the development aid context. The research team worked with a humanitarian aid agency in developing criterions and used Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) in weighting those key criterions.

Findings

The adapted portfolio model was able to evaluate purchases done by the aid agency by incorporating different perspectives related to the strategic importance of purchase and supply vulnerability. In particular, development aid programmes require large supplies annually. Better classification offers improved visualisation of purchases, leading to a more precise adoption of mitigation strategies and policies to minimise supply disruption risks.

Research limitations/implications

Adapting the Kraljic portfolio model is a stepping-stone to building humanitarian supply chain resilience. The proposed humanitarian supply chain resilience framework is based on the foundation that current humanitarian supply chain needs to be re-engineered. In order to re-engineer, the supply base strategy must first be revisited.

Practical implications

Many aid agencies do not have a holistic view on their purchases and commonly apply a transactional classification of purchases that only considers the consumption values. Purchasing strategies mostly focus on cost minimisation, whereas risk mitigations have been disregarded. The proposed portfolio model overcomes these drawbacks. Societal impact may be limited but development aid agencies will be able to offer more reliable aid delivery as part of their mandate.

Originality/value

The proposed portfolio model is among the first tool to guide humanitarian aid agencies to develop procurement strategies to alleviate supply disruptions and increase development aid programmes resilience.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2018

Richard Oloruntoba and Ruth Banomyong

This “thought paper” is written by the special issue editors as a part of the five papers accepted and published in response to the special issue call for papers on…

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4707

Abstract

Purpose

This “thought paper” is written by the special issue editors as a part of the five papers accepted and published in response to the special issue call for papers on logistics and SCM in the context of relief for refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on “refugee logistics” and analyse the nature and challenges of displacement from a displaced person’s perspective. The paper also argues for a more critical appreciation of the role and value that research in logistics, operations and supply chain management (LOSCM) can play in the delivery of services and care for refugees and IDPs from the perspective of preparedness and logistics planning of humanitarian organisations. The paper further outlines basic challenges to undertaking innovative, boundary pushing valuable and impactful research on “refugee logistics” given the difficult ideological, political and policy context in which “refugee logistics research” will be undertaken. The paper also advocates for more critical research in humanitarian logistics (HL), that explicitly acknowledges its ontological, epistemological and methodological limitations even when ethically sound. The paper concludes by suggesting a future research agenda for this new sub-field of humanitarian logistics research.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual paper utilising viewpoints, literature reviews as well as original ideas and thoughts of the authors.

Findings

The new field of “refugee logistics research” is important. It has been neglected in humanitarian logistics research for too long. Hence, there needs to be more research in this sub-field of humanitarian logistics.

Research limitations/implications

This is a “thought paper”. It is the basic conceptual ideas of the authors. While it is not based on empirical work or data collection, it is based on a comprehensive literature research and analysis.

Social implications

This paper advocates for the universal human rights of IDPs and refugees and their dignity, and how LOSCM can contribute to upholding such dignity.

Originality/value

It contributes indirectly to logistics policy and refugee policy as well as logistics service quality and advocacy for human rights and human dignity.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Ruth Banomyong

Lao PDR, as the sole land‐locked country in South East Asia, is dependent upon available infrastructure in neighbouring countries for fast and efficient import of goods…

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2542

Abstract

Lao PDR, as the sole land‐locked country in South East Asia, is dependent upon available infrastructure in neighbouring countries for fast and efficient import of goods. The validity of a cost model for multimodal transport, which was originally proposed by Beresford and Dubey (1990) and developed by Beresford (1999), is tested against a real case in international logistics, namely the import of wine from Marseilles in France to Vientiane in Lao PDR. The main elements of the model are as follows: cost, time, distance, transport mode and intermodal transfer. The model is tested using real data over a series of alternative routes between Marseilles and Vientiane. The selection of appropriate international logistics system will have a direct impact on the efficiency of Lao PDR import channels. The research findings clearly demonstrate that the “sea‐road” combination via Danang Port in Vietnam is the most competitive in terms of costs while the “sea‐rail‐road” option via port Klang in Malaysia and through Thailand offers the fastest transit time.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Ruth Banomyong and Nucharee Supatn

This paper aims to present a supply chain performance assessment tool that measures the performance of key supply chain activities of a firm under different performance dimensions.

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7318

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a supply chain performance assessment tool that measures the performance of key supply chain activities of a firm under different performance dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The tool was developed based on an extensive literature review. The nine key internal supply chain activities, as proposed by Grant et al. in 2006, constituted the backbone of the assessment framework, while performance was measured based on three dimensions: cost, time, and reliability. The tool was pilot‐tested on 44 local SMEs. The results were then compared with existing performance benchmark as well as within the benchmarked group itself and a high performing Thai multinational in order to see whether the developed tool could identify performance gaps in the trial group.

Findings

The results obtained from the tool provide a description of a firm's internal supply chain activity. The utilised supply chain performance framework can isolate each individual supply chain activity. The results are therefore precise enough for firms to identify individual areas of strengths and weaknesses. The tool is relatively simple and easy to use and understand.

Research limitations/implications

Limitation is related to the availability of the required assessment data. The availability of data is a reflection of systematic data collection and storage procedures of the respondent firms.

Originality/value

The tool was developed on clearly defined theoretical foundations. The three dimensions of cost, time and reliability can balance both financial and non‐financial characteristics of supply chain performance. The data required are simple and objective.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Ruth Banomyong and Apichat Sopadang

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for the development of emergency logistics response models. The proposition of a conceptual framework is in itself not…

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2998

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for the development of emergency logistics response models. The proposition of a conceptual framework is in itself not sufficient and simulation models are further needed in order to help emergency logistics decision makers in refining their preparedness planning process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a framework proposition with illustrative case study.

Findings

The use of simulation modelling can help enhance the reliability and validity of developed emergency response model.

Research limitations/implications

The emergency response model outcomes are still based on simulated outputs and would still need to be validated in a real‐life environment. Proposing a new or revised emergency logistics response model is not sufficient. Developed logistics response models need to be further validated and simulation modelling can help enhance validity.

Practical implications

Emergency logistics decision makers can make better informed decisions based on simulation model output and can further refine their decision‐making capability.

Originality/value

The paper posits the contribution of simulation modelling as part of the framework for developing and refining emergency logistics response.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Edward Rubesch and Ruth Banomyong

Maquiladoras operations along the Mexico‐US border are an oft‐studied example of a lean supply chain strategy that allows US manufacturers to benefit from lower labour…

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3291

Abstract

Maquiladoras operations along the Mexico‐US border are an oft‐studied example of a lean supply chain strategy that allows US manufacturers to benefit from lower labour costs in Mexico while being able to supply to assembly plants in the industrial US Midwest, with a minimum of safety stock. This study examines an alternative strategy of the subsidiary of a North American automotive parts producer, which purchases raw and semi‐finished materials from approved North American automotive 2nd tier suppliers, manages the shipment of the materials to a plant in Thailand where the semi‐finished materials are converted in a labour‐intensive process into higher‐value sub‐assemblies. These sub‐assemblies are then shipped back to the US for installation into automobiles at an assembly plant in the Detroit area. The additional logistics costs of using Thailand as a production base are overcome by demonstrable quality advantages and lower wages, as compared to competitors performing similar operations in Mexican maquiladoras. This case study illustrates that international logistics management strategies must also incorporate product characteristics in addition to customer requirements for meeting optimum logistical performance.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Ruth Banomyong

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1246

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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