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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Daniel J. McCarthy, Sheila M. Puffer and Daniel M. Satinsky

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dramatically changed role of Russia in the global economy since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, as the Soviet…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dramatically changed role of Russia in the global economy since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, as the Soviet institutions collapsed and were either reformed or replaced in a new Russian institutional landscape. The paper presents a fact-based and balanced view of Russia’s evolving role in the global economy, as distinguished from the sometimes one-sided view presented by some Western commentators. The authors establish that the two countervailing views are fundamentally based on different cultural perspectives about institutions, primarily the roles of business and government.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is developed as a perspectives article drawing upon the decades of academic and business experience of all three authors with Russian business, management and the economy. The paper focuses on the structure of Russian institutional change and places it within the historical context of the challenges of various periods of time from the late 1980s to the present. The authors posit that cultural foundations complicate that institutional evolution.

Findings

Russia will remain a major player in world markets for energy, raw materials and armaments for the near future at least. Principal institutional questions facing Russia have to do with how to reduce the country’s overall dependence on raw material exports, with its vulnerability to world market fluctuations, and how to modernize Russian economic and political institutions. The degree of success in addressing these questions will depend largely upon the ability of the new and reformed economic institutions to show the flexibility to respond to changes in the global order, on whether political considerations will continue to supersede economic issues, and how markedly cultural traditions will continue to impede positive changes.

Research limitations/implications

The entire system of international trade is under question, disrupted by the growing nationalism that is threatening the globalization that became institutionalized over decades in the wake of the Second World War. Russia’s future role is partially dependent upon how new patterns of international trade develop in response to the current disruption of established trade regimes, and by how political conflicts are expressed economically. The authors observe that Russia’s historical and cultural traditions, especially acquiescence to a highly centralized government with a strong autocratic leader, limit the country’s options. The authors explore how Russia’s reactions to Western sanctions have led to a new strategic approach, moving away from full engagement in the global economy to selective economic, and sometimes political, alliances with primarily non-Western countries, most notably China. The authors contrast Russia’s situation with that of China, which has been able to make substantial economic progress while still embracing a strong, centralized political institutional structure.

Originality/value

Many Western analysts have viewed Russian institutional evolution very critically through the lens of Western politics and sanctions, while Russia has continued along its own path of economic and institutional development. Each view, the authors argue, is based upon differing cultural perspectives of the roles of business and government. As a result, a distinct difference exists between the Western and Russian perspectives on Russia’s role in the world. This paper presents both points of view and explores the future of Russia’s position in the world economy based upon its evolving strategy for national economic policy. The authors contrast the situations of Russia and China, highlighting how Western-centric cultural views have affected perceptions of each country, sometimes similarly and at times with decided differences.

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Kevin B. Bucknall

Looks briefly at where China has done better than the Russian Federation in the process of transition from a centrally planned to a market economy. Examines various…

1972

Abstract

Looks briefly at where China has done better than the Russian Federation in the process of transition from a centrally planned to a market economy. Examines various possible reasons for the different degree of success, drawn from such disciplines as economics, political science, international relations and history, as well the administration and processes adopted, and the cultures involved. Finally, considers a cross‐discipline explanation. Concludes that it is neither possible nor desirable to seek a single explanation for such a complex question. Draws some tentative conclusions about what we can learn from the experiences of both.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Marie‐José Rinaldi‐Larribe, William S. Lightfoot and Zhongxiu Zhao

Throughout the past 30 years, major economic reforms have been implemented in China; in 2001, China's accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) was a major step…

1962

Abstract

Purpose

Throughout the past 30 years, major economic reforms have been implemented in China; in 2001, China's accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) was a major step, since it enabled the country to formally join the globalised world. But China entered the WTO without market economy status (MES), meaning that other countries can easily use the WTO international settlement body in antidumping procedures against Chinese firms. Since joining the WTO, Chinese authorities have repeatedly attempted to gain this status, arguing that considerable progress has been made in dealing with dumping, and that the transition process from a planned to a market economy (ME) has been considerable. This paper aims to explore the issues surrounding this situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors searched the literature in order to understand the reasons why China has been denied the MES until now, according to previous analyses, in order to confront those findings with their own ideas on the subject. Moreover, they list the criteria used by the USA and the European Union (EU) in order to justify the non‐recognition of China as an ME, and they question whether the Chinese economy meets those criteria.

Findings

The paper assesses the extent of the reforms implemented, and determines the further stages that are needed in the transition process.

Originality/value

This paper is a viewpoint that enables readers to have a more precise idea of the present situation of the Chinese economy in terms of being or not an ME, an issue that is often raised but with no clear‐cut conclusion.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 16 December 2021

RUSSIA/CHINA: Moscow will seek alternative payments

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES266186

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Executive summary
Publication date: 11 June 2018

RUSSIA/CHINA: Shanghai states cannot forge strong bloc

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES235358

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Christoph Lattemann

A high quality of corporate governance practices is important for a sustainable development of an economy. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the convergence and…

1910

Abstract

Purpose

A high quality of corporate governance practices is important for a sustainable development of an economy. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the convergence and adaption of corporate governance practices in emerging markets. It shows how Brazil, Russia, India, and China (BRIC) firms apply international standards of good corporate governance and which factors affect the quality of corporate governance practices in BRIC countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use country and firm-level data from the BRIC countries and apply statistical models to identify the convergence of corporate governance practices. In all, 135 largest firms from Brazil, Russia, China, and India are analyzed.

Findings

The study shows that firms from BRIC countries adapt to international best practices in corporate governance beyond the official requirements by national corporate governance codes. International institutions positively influence BRIC firms to apply international standards of good corporate governance. National corporate governance regimes (Anglo-American, Continental-European, and mixed systems) follow path dependencies and lead to differences in corporate governance practices among firms in different regimes.

Research limitations/implications

Only a small number of 13 corporate governance best practices and a small number of countries have been selected and coded for this analysis. The presented results have to be interpreted with some caution.

Originality/value

The study concludes with practical and specific insights for investors, managers, and policy makers on the importance of national government regimes and international institutions on corporate governance practices. Investors in BRIC need to better understand the contrasting governance environments in emerging markets, and their effects on corporate governance practices in each country. The findings suggest that corporate governance should be studied by considering multilevel antecedents on a country-, industry-, and firm-level.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 25 July 2017

Russia's deepening ties with China over the last four years reflect Moscow's isolation from the West. Despite Moscow's efforts, the pace of Chinese investment in Russia…

Expert briefing
Publication date: 7 February 2022

The document says China as well as Russia is against NATO expansion; in return Moscow objects to the US-UK-Australian AUKUS deal and the creation of any new security blocs…

Graphic analysis
Publication date: 4 November 2021

The Tajik government has broken with Russia, China, Iran and Uzbekistan by refusing to court the Taliban

Expert briefing
Publication date: 13 December 2021

South-east Asia provides the Kremlin opportunities to advance its ‘great power’ interests. Meanwhile, the region remains a key theatre for the United States and China to…

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