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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2023

Russell Williams

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to review and synthesise key concepts in luxury with key concepts in well-being to provide a framework to better understand how luxury…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to review and synthesise key concepts in luxury with key concepts in well-being to provide a framework to better understand how luxury well-being propositions can be designed and delivered for the growing superyacht marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature review of key terms: object-related, symbolic and experiential luxury, co-creation of value and well-being.

Findings

This paper aims to observe the size, growth and opportunity of the superyacht market. Moreover, the paper observes that the locus of luxury value is shifting towards experiences and that to achieve the hedonic and eudaimonic outcomes of well-being happiness, crew have an important role to play in the co-creation of value through their interaction with guests and their use of the physical environment.

Practical implications

This paper aims to highlight the importance of combining the mechanics and humanics of the luxury superyacht experiencescape to co-create luxury value across both the dimensions of experience (education, entertainment, escapism and aesthetics) and the dimensions of well-being (body, mind, spirit and environment).

Originality/value

The paper presents a framework for the co-creation of luxury value in the context of luxury well-being on superyachts.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Wan Nur Fazni Wan Mohamad Nazarie and Russell Williams

The study aims to explore language style and gender match as a key part of initial trust among potential donors and how this leads to funding success based on the similarity…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore language style and gender match as a key part of initial trust among potential donors and how this leads to funding success based on the similarity attraction and homophily theories. Empirical analyses of 160 respondents revealed that people are more concerned about “how it is written” (language style) than “who has written it” (gender).

Design/methodology/approach

Crowdfunding (CF) is an internet-based method of funding employed by project founders, allowing individuals to raise funds from the crowd to support their projects. It is important for project founders to attract the crowd’s interest as potential funders commonly have limited information about projects. One of the early cues about a project that can be picked up by the crowd in CF projects is the text description of the proposal. This text description is crucial for giving the crowd an understanding of the project and for promoting the crowd’s trust in the founder, encouraging them to fund the CF project. Based on the similarity attraction and homophily theories, this study sets out to explore language style and gender match as key elements of initial trust among potential donors and how they lead to funding success. A 2 × 2 factorial experimental design (e.g. subject, male and female, × male language style and female language style) was used for the study. To determine the sample size of the experiment, this study applied power and sample size estimations to measure how many respondents were needed for the experiment. Based on the power table of effect size, 128 respondents were considered to be a sufficient number for this experiment to ensure sufficient statistical power of 0.8 and a significance level of 0.05. This study fulfilled the requirement by recruiting 160 respondents, which corresponded to 40 subjects per group based on a 2 × 2 factorial design (the respondents’ gender, male and female, and text language style, male and female). The empirical analysis of 160 respondents revealed that people are more concerned about “how it is written” (language style) than “who has written it” (gender).

Findings

This paper contributes to project founders’ understanding and knowledge of the importance of linguistic style, which can determine the success of a CF project. One of the important results of this study is that the crowd can identify the author’s gender based on their writing style. Through an experiment applying factorial analysis (2 × 2), it was found that people are more concerned about “how it is written” (language style) than with “who it is written by” (gender). This means that the project founder, if they know who their audience is, should know how to write the project proposal so that it fits the audience’s preferences. More specifically, the success rate of CF projects can be increased by integrating suitable word dimensions in promotions of projects on CF platforms. Therefore, it can be argued that linguistic style is a powerful agent for building a connection with a target audience. The findings of this study can be used as theoretical guidance, and eventually, the potential antecedents of funding intention can be further explored.

Research limitations/implications

This study is subject to several limitations. The result is limited to donation-based CF. As this study focuses on the language style of project founders when they describe their CF projects, donation-based CF was the most appropriate platform for this research. In donation-based CF, the style words are more emotion-based, compared to other CF platforms. The experiment, however, could also be replicated for other CF types such as reward-based CF. One important part of CF projects is persuading the crowd to fund them. It is worth mentioning that reward-based CF involves individuals pledging to a business in exchange for a reward. Yet, even though reward-based CF offers rewards, it is generally considered a subset of donation-based CF because there is no financial return to the backer. Therefore, it is suggested that future research should also consider case studies in reward-based CF. Second, from the persuading perspective, this study focusses on narrative language style only, as it facilitates the crowd’s understanding of a CF project. Future study can further focus on other information content such as videos in the project proposal. Prior research has found that providing a video in a CF project increases the crowd’s confidence in funding (Mitra, 2012). The study is also supported by previous studies that suggest producing a higher quality of video in the project proposal positively related to the success of CF projects (Mollick (2014)).

Practical implications

The result of this study empirically confirmed that the crowd’s willingness to fund a project proposal and their trust are dependent on the text description of the project proposal. The project founders need to know how to describe the content of a project so that it signals the quality of the project, especially in early start-ups. In other words, the way that a project is created and published through a CF platform will send a valuable signal to the potential donors about the project, and they will either find it acceptable or reject it. If the project appears to lack demand among potential donors, it is easier for project founders to quickly identify that the project will fail, without the need to invest additional capital.

Social implications

The findings of this study have important social implications that provide guidelines for project founders on establishing a strategy to help the crowd understand their projects. At the same time, the findings can help the crowd to make their funding decisions. First, the text language used in the CF project by the project founder plays an important role in presenting the campaign and all the ideas need to be presented in a clear way so that the crowd understands the project. In CF projects, pitch is everything (Varsamis, 2018). The pitch refers to the text or video that is provided by the project founder to show their project proposal to the crowd. Compared with traditional funding channels (such as venture capital, i.e. banks), CF is more convenient for raising funds. This is because the project founders need to show their ideas in a creative way to the crowd online, rather than preparing a complex plan and racking their brains on how they can persuade investors to participate (Wang and Yang (2019)). This research intends to help project founders understand how they can influence the crowd by improving the text language used in their CF projects.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how the linguistic style of the project founder would lead to the success rate of crowdfunding projects.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Olga Orlova and Russell Williams

Finnish‐Russian trade has declined to 7‐8 per cent of Finland’s exports by volume. In spite of this decline, and the most recent Russian crisis (August 1998), the Russian market…

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Abstract

Finnish‐Russian trade has declined to 7‐8 per cent of Finland’s exports by volume. In spite of this decline, and the most recent Russian crisis (August 1998), the Russian market still offers great potential by virtue of its sheer size, proximity and the experience Finnish business has in international operations with Russia. The case made here though is that, before Finnish firms can take advantage of these three factors it needs to adapt (customize) the payment options it offers to its Russian buyers. Thus, instead of the favored settlement being made totally by prepayment, mixing pre‐payment and payments against documents satisfies better both parties – importer and exporter – in this post‐crisis era. This conclusion is, moreover, transferable to countries other than Finland either engaged in, or pursuing, international operations with Russia.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Joshua Keller and Ping Tian

The way organizational actors use language to think about and communicate their organizational experiences is central to how organizational actors enact organizational paradox…

Abstract

The way organizational actors use language to think about and communicate their organizational experiences is central to how organizational actors enact organizational paradox. However, most inquiries into the role of language in the organizational paradox literature has focused on specific components of language (e.g., discourse), without attention to the complex, multi-level linguistic system that is interconnected to organizational processes. In this chapter, we expand our knowledge of the role of language by integrating paradox research with research from the linguistics discipline. We identify a series of linguistic tensions (i.e., generalizability-specificity, universalism-particularism, and explicitness-implicitness) that are nested within organizational paradoxes. In the process, we reveal how the organizing paradox of control and autonomy is interconnected to other paradoxes (i.e., performing, learning, and belonging) through the instantiation of linguistic paradoxes. We discuss the implications of our findings for research on paradox and language.

Details

Interdisciplinary Dialogues on Organizational Paradox: Investigating Social Structures and Human Expression, Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-187-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2019

John N. Moye

Abstract

Details

Learning Differentiated Curriculum Design in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-117-4

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Russell Williams and Miriam Dargel

Following Bitner's well‐known “servicescape” model, the propensity of physical surroundings to facilitate organisational as well as marketing goals is now well researched. Their…

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Abstract

Following Bitner's well‐known “servicescape” model, the propensity of physical surroundings to facilitate organisational as well as marketing goals is now well researched. Their importance is, in general, more important in service settings because of the unique characteristics of services, particularly their intangibility and perishability, the inseparability of production and consumption, and heterogeneity in delivery quality. E‐businesses, whether offering products or services, ultimately share many service characteristics. For example, the benefits consumed are often not solely in the products purchased, which could have been purchased elsewhere, but rather in the intangible benefits of interaction with the website, i.e. saved time, convenience, and a reduced risk of dissatisfaction with an enhanced availability of information. This paper adapts Bitner's model to encounters in “cyberspace”, where the key characteristics of the service “product” are still present, with the result that, just as in the physical setting, stimuli may be planned and designed to engender approach behaviour. In so doing, it borrows from the motivational psychology construct of “flow”, a metaphor for optimal experiences.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Content available
502

Abstract

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Scans the top 400 management publications in the world to identify the most topical issues and latest concepts. These are presented in an easy‐to‐digest briefing of no more than 1,500 words.

Findings

As management fashions come and go and the latest buzzwords in organizational life are replaced with new ones, consultants and gurus are blamed for spreading new ideas that never last. Charged with serving only their own interests with the introduction of each new managerial fad, consultants typically take the blame for selling solutions and strategies that bring few long‐term results.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Kara Chan, Birgitte Tufte, Gianna Cappello and Russell B. Williams

The present study aims to examine girls' perception of gender roles and gender identities in Hong Kong.

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Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to examine girls' perception of gender roles and gender identities in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 16 girls aged 10 to 12 were asked to take pictures from the media that could illustrate “what girls or women should or should not be; and what girls or women should or should not do”. Qualitative interviews were conducted.

Findings

Analysis of interviews and images captured found that tween girls' perceived gender roles for females were based on a mixture of traditional and contemporary role models. Girls in Hong Kong demonstrated conservatism in sexuality. Sexy outlook and pre‐marital sexual relations were considered inappropriate. Tween girls showed concern about global as well as domestic social agendas. They used a variety of media and showed interest in contents primarily for adults.

Research limitations/implications

The study was based on a convenience sample. The interviewees came from middle to lower income families, limiting the validity for generalization. Further quantitative study is needed to establish benchmarks.

Practical implications

This study will help in understanding the kinds of media images that attract the attention of female tweens and what those images mean to them. The study can serve as a guideline for marketing communication aimed at this target group, particularly for skincare, beauty, and cosmetic marketers.

Originality/value

The first novel idea that is being used in this research is the combination of visual method and the application of qualitative methodology to the study of media effects. The second novel idea is the use of interviewees as data‐collectors. The methodology enables contextually relevant questions and to understand the meaning of the images captured.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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