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1 – 10 of 308
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Russell W. Clayton, Christopher H. Thomas, Bryan S. Schaffer, Micheal Stratton, Ellen Garrison and Leah Greden Mathews

Recent research along with anecdotal evidence suggests that exercise may play a role in mitigating perceptions of work-family conflict (WFC). However, the temporal effects…

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Abstract

Purpose

Recent research along with anecdotal evidence suggests that exercise may play a role in mitigating perceptions of work-family conflict (WFC). However, the temporal effects related to this relationship have been ignored. The purpose of this paper is to address this issue by testing for the effects of acute and long-term exercise on the work-family interface.

Design/methodology/approach

Employed females (N=46) were randomly assigned to a treatment (exercise) or control group (no exercise) and data were gathered at three points in time, over four weeks. Linear Mixed Model processes were conducted.

Findings

The authors found that there is a statistically significant long-term exercise effect on strain-based work interference with family and family interference with work.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was restricted to sedentary females, was predominantly white/Caucasian, and held white-collar jobs, limiting the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Results from the current study suggest that exercise assists individuals in managing the work-family interface. While this is not a broad-sweeping call for all employers to offer on-site exercise facilities, the authors suggest that employers consider offering accommodations to individuals seeking to utilize exercise as a way to reduce WFC and general stress.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study that examines the temporal impact of exercise on the work-family interface.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Jane Whitney Gibson, Russell W. Clayton, Jack Deem, Jacqueline E. Einstein and Erin L. Henry

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significant contributions of Lillian M. Gilbreth through the lens of critical biography to put her work in the context of her…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significant contributions of Lillian M. Gilbreth through the lens of critical biography to put her work in the context of her life events, her key roles, the turning points in her life and the societal context within which her contributions to management thought were made.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical biography examines the interaction of a person’s life events with the social, economic and political contexts surrounding his or her life and draws inferences as to why the person made specific decisions and contributions.

Findings

Key contributions to management thought made by Lillian M. Gilbreth are linked to her biographical events, including the multiple roles she played as daughter, student, wife, mother, author, engineer, psychologist, breadwinner, domestic scientist and teacher. Various turning points in her life are identified, including being allowed to go to college, taking her first psychology course, marrying Frank Gilbreth, publishing Fatigue Studies and Frank’s death. Key societal factors that influenced Gilbreth’s contributions were the growing interest in scientific management, the status of women and the increased interest in domestic science.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative technique of critical biography is demonstrated as a useful methodology for examining individual contributions to management history. The authors acknowledge the limitation of subjective interpretation.

Practical implications

The reasons behind Lillian Gilbreth’s contributions, which were considered a precursor to the human relations era, are extrapolated from this research.

Social implications

The influence of social context is examined, as it pertains to the life and work of Lillian Gilbreth.

Originality/value

This paper provides a critical biography of Lillian M. Gilbreth and her work within the context of her life and times.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Leigh Ann Bynum, Russell W. Clayton, Mario Hayek, Miriam Moeller and Wallace A. Williams

This paper analyzes Chandler's biography of Henry Varnum Poor to assess Chandler's contribution to management history as a biographer.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyzes Chandler's biography of Henry Varnum Poor to assess Chandler's contribution to management history as a biographer.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Winter's content thematic analysis, measure Poor's motivational needs for achievement, affiliation‐intimacy, and power, as they are depicted by Chandler throughout the stages of Poor's career as a business editor, analyst, and reformer.

Findings

Our analysis shows that Chandler views Poor's motivation as stable throughout Poor's three professional roles. This paper found that Chandler views Poor as primarily driven by his need for power, followed by a significant need for achievement, and a minor need for affiliation throughout his working life.

Originality/value

This research is unique because it provides the first social‐scientific assessment of Chandler's contribution to management history as a biographer.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Milorad M. Novicevic, Russell W. Clayton and Wallace A. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to examine Chester Barnard's decisional model utilizing the lens of image theory. The main claim is that the individual decision‐making model…

2442

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Chester Barnard's decisional model utilizing the lens of image theory. The main claim is that the individual decision‐making model proposed by Barnard in his Notes on the Significance of Decisive Behavior can be evaluated within the framework of image theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper performed a comparative analysis of Barnard's and image theory's models of decision making to outline congruence and incongruence between Barnard's early conceptualization of individual decision making and the contemporary understanding of image theory.

Findings

The findings provide support to the claim that image theory is an appropriate framework to describe Barnard's model.

Originality/value

The unique contribution of this study is that it provides the first theoretical analysis of Barnard's model of individual decision making. Barnard's model of individual decision making is little known because it was posthumously published in his Notes on the Significance of Decisive Behavior 35 years after Barnard's death.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

W. Randy Evans, Stephanie S. Pane Haden, Russell W. Clayton and Milorad M. Novicevic

The aim of this paper is to examine the development of the social responsibility (SR) of business concept and related management philosophies through the…

10175

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the development of the social responsibility (SR) of business concept and related management philosophies through the history‐of‐management‐thought perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The history‐of‐management‐thought approach to social responsibility (SR) is grounded in the paradigm of continuing progress exemplified by the contributions of great management thinkers (e.g. Fayol, Taylor, Follett, Barnard). A historical evolution of the SR concept is provided, together with tracing the development of stakeholder theory in its attempt to depict the relationship between stakeholder management and SR.

Findings

Three management philosophies (recognition of the external environment, a need for collaboration, and a need for a shared understanding) emerge from both classical and modern management thinkers. Recent conceptualizations have added depth by clarifying the meaning of social responsibility and in addition, detailing the nature of firm‐stakeholder relationships. Despite voluminous literature, achieving collaborative integration between firms and stakeholders in practice appears elusive.

Practical implications

These management philosophies can help organizations navigate the intertwined relationship between business and society. Business leaders need to consider the vital role of trust in building more collaborative relationships.

Originality/value

The unique contribution of this paper is to provide the first history‐of‐management‐thought perspective on the social responsibility of business by tracing changes in the conceptualization of this concept, including the related stakeholder paradigm, to their roots in the works of renowned management thinkers.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Milorad M. Novicevic, M. Ronald Buckley, Russell W. Clayton, Miriam Moeller and Wallace A. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to commemorate Alfred Chandler, a truly outstanding business historian, through the unique lens of his revisionists.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to commemorate Alfred Chandler, a truly outstanding business historian, through the unique lens of his revisionists.

Design/methodology/approach

By developing a classifying framework, Chandler's revisionists is analyzed based on the extent to which they critique Chandler's interpretation of the role of managers in large organizations.

Findings

The revisionist critiques of Chandler's works is traced and examine how they can contribute to the intent of commemorating Chandler and his works.

Practical implications

The most relevant revisionists of Chandler's works are highlighted in a manner that might be valuable for the understanding of how Chandler's revisionists can be interpreted within both functional and critical paradigms.

Originality/value

The unique contributions of this study is its focus on providing a specific form of commemoration through the lens of Chandler's revisionists and thus putting “Chandler in a larger frame” of management history.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Mario Hayek, Wallace A. Williams, Russell W. Clayton, Milorad M. Novicevic and John H. Humphreys

The purpose of this paper is to extend the body of knowledge of authentic leadership in extreme contexts by developing a framework grounded in the Sartrean existentialist…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the body of knowledge of authentic leadership in extreme contexts by developing a framework grounded in the Sartrean existentialist perspective on authenticity and illustrating this framework using the works of Xenophon.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use Sartre’s existential view of authenticity to develop a framework of authentic leadership in extreme contexts. They then use this framework to examine Xenophon’s recount of the retreat of the 10,000 in the classic work, Anabasis. For this analysis, the authors iterate between the ideas of the past and the concepts of the present to understand how this classic has influenced and informed the current body of knowledge about leadership.

Findings

Using a Sartrean existentialist lens, “in extremis” authentic leaders exhibit an awareness of context extremity, responsibility in leading and following to share risks in extreme contexts and self-determination that inspires mutual trust and loyalty.

Practical implications

A Sartrean existentialist perspective suggests that authentic leaders in extreme contexts reflect authenticity by exhibiting and encouraging freedom of choice. By espousing this perspective, authentic leaders create common goals and interests that appeal to followers' intrinsic motivation which has been found to result in positive individual and organizational outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the authentic leadership literature by using an existential conceptualization of authenticity to examine leadership in extreme contexts. This conceptualization might be more appropriate than the Aristotelian virtue-based deterministic philosophy that has dominated authentic leadership research.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Mario Hayek, Milorad M. Novicevic, M. Ronald Buckley, Russell W. Clayton and Foster Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to examine how one of Dale Carnegie's historically best selling self‐help books, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living, resonates with the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how one of Dale Carnegie's historically best selling self‐help books, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living, resonates with the contemporary conceptualization of psychological capital (PsyCap).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a narrative historical interpretation to analyze Dale Carnegie's book How to Stop Worrying and Start Living. Initially, two of the co‐authors independently identified passages mirroring each of the four PsyCap capacities, while in the final stage a consensus on the interpretation was reached with the remaining co‐authors.

Findings

The components of the PsyCap construct resonate well with the prescriptions that Carnegie narrated and outlined in his best selling book How to Stop Worrying and Start Living.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study should be interpreted with a recognition that an alternative critical approach to narrative analysis could have been conducted based on the narrative logic of social power structure.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in placing an emphasis on the insights researchers and practitioners alike can gain by re‐evaluating the self‐help books from the past.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Shawn Carraher and John Humphreys

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

97

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

1 – 10 of 308