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Article

Quinton Nottingham, Dana M. Johnson and Roberta Russell

Pressure from competition; inflexible third-party reimbursements; greater demand from government, regulatory and certifying agencies; discerning patients; and the quest of…

Abstract

Purpose

Pressure from competition; inflexible third-party reimbursements; greater demand from government, regulatory and certifying agencies; discerning patients; and the quest of healthcare entities for greater profitably place demands and high expectations for service quality impacting overall patient experience. Extending a prior multivariate, single-period model of varied medical practices predicting patient experience to a three-year time period to understand whether there was a change in overall assessment using data analytics. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

SEM was employed on a per year and aggregated, three-year basis to gain insights into qualitative psychometric constructs predicting overall patient experience and strength of the relationships.

Findings

Statistically significant differences were uncovered between years indicating the strength of the relationships of latent variables on overall performance.

Research limitations/implications

Study focused on data gathered from a questionnaire mailed to patients who visited various outpatient medical clinics in a rural community with over 4,000 responses during the three-year study period. A higher percentage of female respondents over the age of 45 may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Practitioners can gain a broader understanding of different factors influencing overall patient experience. Administrative processes associated with the primary care provider are inconsequential. Patients are not as concerned with patient flow as they are with patient safety and health.

Originality/value

This research informs healthcare quality management of psychometrics and analytics to improve the overall patient experience in outpatient medical clinics.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Andrew Creed, Ambika Zutshi and Russell Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to develop a nuanced interpretative frame that can help global managers with recommendations to avoid misapplied power with group and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a nuanced interpretative frame that can help global managers with recommendations to avoid misapplied power with group and organizational situations.

Design/methodology/approach

Embodied metaphor is applied in analysis of the theory-praxis nexus to reconceive the bases, processes and resources associated with group and organizational power. Identified are patterns of relations in organizational bases and circuits of power, as expressed through literal and symbolic aspects of human hands and fingers. The paper does not revolve around gesticulations; instead focusing upon a novel, meta-cultural development of touchlines of the human hand, revealing conceptual relationships with the implementation of influence.

Findings

A differentiated understanding of the touchline powers of technology, information, self-awareness, relation to others and access to money can respectively improve decisions and actions. Insights are provided in the areas of controlling people to achieve objectives, demeaning others, managing change and resistance for personal gain, negotiating contracts, advancing personal interests and coordinating reward or punishment.

Research limitations/implications

Choosing one metaphor may contribute to the exclusion of other perspectives, however, the embodied nature of the hand and touchlines tends to cross cultures and may assist further research to address the embedded nature of abuses of organizational power.

Originality/value

The contribution is in the theory-praxis nexus to assist global managers in addressing the risk of potential misuse of power and influence in organizations and to respond to calls for ancient indigenous epistemological systems to assume a role in contemporary management studies.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article

Ki Hyun Um and Antonio K.W. Lau

Few scholars have so far explored how healthcare service quality affects patient dissatisfaction, leading to negative behavior responses when a healthcare service fails…

Abstract

Purpose

Few scholars have so far explored how healthcare service quality affects patient dissatisfaction, leading to negative behavior responses when a healthcare service fails. The purpose of this paper is to examine how different service quality attributes affect patient dissatisfaction leading to a variety of asymmetric negative behavior responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a survey of 453 dissatisfied outpatients in Korea, structural equation modeling with a series of post hoc analyses is used to test the research model. It consists of five hypotheses.

Findings

Outcome quality is found to be the most significant variable affecting patient dissatisfaction, followed by administrative quality, interactive quality, and environmental quality. Dissatisfied patients tend to engage more in active behaviors (e.g. negative word-of-mouth, switching, and complaining) than in remaining passive in a non-linear way. Also, the mediating role of dissatisfaction is found to be significant.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has empirically identified the most significant service quality attributes that lead to dissatisfied patients and negative behaviors on their part. These findings indicate that different quality attributes of service failure lead to different actions. However, this study has suffered from a few limitations as a result of its research context and scope.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the very few empirical studies examining the relationships among the output and process quality attributes, patient dissatisfaction, and actual behaviors in a healthcare service failure context.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Dana M. Johnson, Roberta S. Russell and Sheneeta W. White

This research models the impact of patient perceptions of care quality on overall patient satisfaction in a rural healthcare organization over a three-year time period…

Abstract

Purpose

This research models the impact of patient perceptions of care quality on overall patient satisfaction in a rural healthcare organization over a three-year time period. The purpose of this paper is to determine if the factors that influence perceptions of service quality change over time and if the change affects overall patient satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected for three fiscal years (2012-2014) using a 36-question, Likert-scaled attitudinal survey. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify which constructs of five different service quality dimensions were statistically significant in predicting overall patient satisfaction. Paired comparison of means and ANOVA F-tests highlighted significant differences across years and demographics.

Findings

Multiple regression models of overall patient satisfaction over a three-year time period had significant repeat variables, indicating salience of the dimensions and constructs of service quality that predict patient satisfaction. However, some dimensions of service quality did not remain significant from one year to another, indicating there may be a gap in the patient service cycle over an extended time frame.

Originality/value

This paper explored the sequential relationship between patient satisfaction survey data and perceptions of service quality over a multi-year time frame. The research focussed on outpatient medical clinics, while the majority of previous studies have focussed on acute care or inpatient stays. A longitudinal study is especially relevant for outpatient clinics where continuity of care is important.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part

Michael Howe, Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang and Russell E. Johnson

Research on self-regulation has tended to focus on goal-related performance, with limited attention paid to individuals’ affect and the role it plays during the…

Abstract

Research on self-regulation has tended to focus on goal-related performance, with limited attention paid to individuals’ affect and the role it plays during the goal-striving process. In this chapter we discuss three mechanisms to integrate affect within a control theory-based self-regulation framework, and how such integrations inform future research concerning employee stress and well-being. Specifically, affect can be viewed as a result of velocity made toward one’s desired states at work. Fast progress results in positive affect, which enhances employee well-being and reduces the detrimental effects associated with exposure to occupational stressors. On the other hand, slow or no progress elicits negative affect, which induces employee distress. Second, affect can also be considered an input of self-regulation, such that employees are required to regulate their emotional displays at work. Employees who perform emotional labor compare their actual emotional display against the desired display prescribed by display rules. Third, affect can function as a situational disturbance, altering employees’ perceptions or assessments of the input, comparator, and output for other self-regulatory processes.

Details

The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

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Article

Russell Johnson and Brian H. Kleiner

Discusses recent developments and innovations in total qualitymanagement (TQM). Defines and outlines principles of TQM as advanced byleading management theorists and looks…

Abstract

Discusses recent developments and innovations in total quality management (TQM). Defines and outlines principles of TQM as advanced by leading management theorists and looks at the role of process variation. Examines why TQM has been adopted in the Aerospace and Defence Industries and how they have defined the practice. Finally, looks at the application and results of TQM implementation at one aerospace company.

Details

Work Study, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article

Erin M. Jackson, Michael E. Rossi, E. Rickamer Hoover and Russell E. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to examine employee perceptions of fairness and work morale as mediators of the relationship between leader reward behavior and employee behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine employee perceptions of fairness and work morale as mediators of the relationship between leader reward behavior and employee behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A matrix of meta‐analytic estimates containing the focal variables (leader reward behavior, fairness, morale, and employee behavior) was constructed following a literature review of published studies. This matrix was then analyzed using structural equation modeling to test a series of nested models.

Findings

Leader reward behavior is positively related to higher task performance and organizational citizenship behavior, and fewer intentions to turnover. These relationships are mediated by employees’ perceptions of fairness and work morale.

Research limitations/implications

The paper extends the leadership literature by identifying two mechanisms (viz., fairness and morale) through which leader reward behavior relates to employee behavior. Possible limitations are the drawbacks associated with meta‐analysis (e.g. inability to make causal inferences).

Practical implications

Rewarding subordinate performance alone is not sufficient to increase task performance and organizational citizenship behavior and decrease turnover intentions. Instead, managers must ensure that their contingent reward behaviors are seen as fair by employees in order to have favorable effects.

Originality/value

To date, research on possible mediators of the effects of leader reward behavior has been scarce.

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Book part

Tricia Valdez-Zontek, Teddi Beam-Conroy and Nancy Encarnación

Why do K-12 schools not perform better in educating English Language Learners (ELLs)? Part of the problem lies with higher education: We continue to produce pre-service…

Abstract

Why do K-12 schools not perform better in educating English Language Learners (ELLs)? Part of the problem lies with higher education: We continue to produce pre-service teachers who are not prepared for today’s multilingual student population and, more importantly, most currently practicing teachers lack any such preparation.

Details

University Partnerships for Community and School System Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-132-3

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Article

Russell D. Johnson and Brian H. Kleiner

The conventional wisdom of managers in the US dictates that improving product quality will increase the cost of making the product which will either increase the price or…

Abstract

The conventional wisdom of managers in the US dictates that improving product quality will increase the cost of making the product which will either increase the price or reduce the profits. Shows that improving the quality of a product or service will not necessarily increase its manufacturing cost. Obtains information on fundamental theories and case histories from business literature and uses evidence to support the hypothesis from the case histories of several US companies which have achieved higher quality with lower quality costs and improved profitability. Examples from the literature include the case histories of companies such as Florida Power & Light, Globe Metallurgical, Motorola, and Westinghouse Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division. These examples indicate increases in return on assets, improved customer satisfaction, increased market share, and increased revenues and profits. Suggests that a company which can achieve successfully both higher quality and lower cost will have improved productivity, lower manufacturing costs, better quality, greater customer satisfaction, a higher market share and greater profitability.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

James E. Folkestad and Russell L. Johnson

The strategic integration of rapid prototyping and rapid tooling is being used for getting product to the market quickly by resolving a long‐standing conflict between…

Abstract

The strategic integration of rapid prototyping and rapid tooling is being used for getting product to the market quickly by resolving a long‐standing conflict between design and manufacturing. Currently rapid tooling can be produced at such reduced cost and time that the tool is considered to be disposable. The ability to produce inexpensive tooling allows the life cycle to be fundamentally changed, incorporating the concept and tooling review into one development phase and allowing both design and manufacturing requirements to be identified. This approach has allowed management to release product based on competitive market strategy rather than an estimated deadline.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

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