Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Michael Howe, Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang and Russell E. Johnson

Research on self-regulation has tended to focus on goal-related performance, with limited attention paid to individuals’ affect and the role it plays during the…

Abstract

Research on self-regulation has tended to focus on goal-related performance, with limited attention paid to individuals’ affect and the role it plays during the goal-striving process. In this chapter we discuss three mechanisms to integrate affect within a control theory-based self-regulation framework, and how such integrations inform future research concerning employee stress and well-being. Specifically, affect can be viewed as a result of velocity made toward one’s desired states at work. Fast progress results in positive affect, which enhances employee well-being and reduces the detrimental effects associated with exposure to occupational stressors. On the other hand, slow or no progress elicits negative affect, which induces employee distress. Second, affect can also be considered an input of self-regulation, such that employees are required to regulate their emotional displays at work. Employees who perform emotional labor compare their actual emotional display against the desired display prescribed by display rules. Third, affect can function as a situational disturbance, altering employees’ perceptions or assessments of the input, comparator, and output for other self-regulatory processes.

Details

The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Erin M. Jackson, Michael E. Rossi, E. Rickamer Hoover and Russell E. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to examine employee perceptions of fairness and work morale as mediators of the relationship between leader reward behavior and employee behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine employee perceptions of fairness and work morale as mediators of the relationship between leader reward behavior and employee behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A matrix of meta‐analytic estimates containing the focal variables (leader reward behavior, fairness, morale, and employee behavior) was constructed following a literature review of published studies. This matrix was then analyzed using structural equation modeling to test a series of nested models.

Findings

Leader reward behavior is positively related to higher task performance and organizational citizenship behavior, and fewer intentions to turnover. These relationships are mediated by employees’ perceptions of fairness and work morale.

Research limitations/implications

The paper extends the leadership literature by identifying two mechanisms (viz., fairness and morale) through which leader reward behavior relates to employee behavior. Possible limitations are the drawbacks associated with meta‐analysis (e.g. inability to make causal inferences).

Practical implications

Rewarding subordinate performance alone is not sufficient to increase task performance and organizational citizenship behavior and decrease turnover intentions. Instead, managers must ensure that their contingent reward behaviors are seen as fair by employees in order to have favorable effects.

Originality/value

To date, research on possible mediators of the effects of leader reward behavior has been scarce.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Aurora J. Dixon, Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang and Russell E. Johnson

A number of theoretical frameworks exist to explain perpetrators’ motivation for workplace aggression. Most of them consider these behaviors as retaliatory actions from…

Abstract

A number of theoretical frameworks exist to explain perpetrators’ motivation for workplace aggression. Most of them consider these behaviors as retaliatory actions from individuals who experience triggering events in their workplaces. The current chapter describes a model that focuses on the motivations underlying proactive workplace aggression, and identifies situations where perpetrators consider their aggressive behaviors as morally justifiable. In particular, we argue that depending on the targets’ in- versus out-group membership and higher- versus lower-status in the hierarchy, aggressive behaviors may be viewed as acceptable to achieve perpetrators’ goals of forcing compliance or managing identity. The model extends the current literature by considering non-retaliatory workplace aggression, and by identifying potential avenues for future research and intervention to reduce proactive workplace aggression.

Details

Mistreatment in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-117-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Mistreatment in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-117-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Mistreatment in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-117-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Mistreatment in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-117-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Helen Taylor and Cary L. Cooper

Organisational change, for some employees, can pose threat, for others challenge. It has been found that, given the same organisational stressors, certain individuals fall…

Abstract

Organisational change, for some employees, can pose threat, for others challenge. It has been found that, given the same organisational stressors, certain individuals fall victim to stress and ill‐health, whereas others remain healthy. In order to seek a clearer understanding of this phenomenon, the personality/stress/health relationship is explored with reference to individual differences in Type A behaviour, locus of control, hardiness, extraversion, neuroticism, and tension discharge rate. It is suggested that organisational change management should be within the framework of communication, control and counselling. Future research should pursue a multidimensional, interactive course to gain a greater insight into this highly complex relationship.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

1 – 10 of over 3000