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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Russell Clement and Dane Robertson

Small libraries are often more successful at effective automation than the large resource‐rich research libraries. One reason is that their pragmatic attitudes turn many…

Abstract

Small libraries are often more successful at effective automation than the large resource‐rich research libraries. One reason is that their pragmatic attitudes turn many of the small libraries' disadvantages in the areas of collection, staff and budget size to their advantage. Small collections are more readily automated and easily accessed, they have limited automation budgets and measurable improvements in basic services and operations receive top priority. This creates a results‐oriented accountability which pressures smaller libraries to make their systems work or to look elsewhere. Large libraries, by contrast, are often disappointed when overly ambitious automation projects flounder. Bringing software development in‐house often only compounds the problem. This paper argues that large libraries should follow the lead of their less prestigious neighbors by focusing on a more practical approach to automation.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Gretchen Freeman and Russell Clement

The successful implementation of an automated library system depends on many factors. While systems and libraries vary greatly, an area that can never be overlooked is…

Abstract

The successful implementation of an automated library system depends on many factors. While systems and libraries vary greatly, an area that can never be overlooked is staff training. By its very nature automation training differs from other types of in‐house library instruction. This article identifies seven critical issues in implementing and maintaining a staff training program. Issues discussed include timing, modularity location, documentation, follow‐up and continuity.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Randall Graves and Russell Clement

Power conditioning measures are taken to ensure the supply of ‘clean’ electrical power for electrical and electronic installations. This article looks at the circumstances…

Abstract

Power conditioning measures are taken to ensure the supply of ‘clean’ electrical power for electrical and electronic installations. This article looks at the circumstances that create a need for power conditioning, with particular reference to library installations. The first part of the paper examines the causes and effects of power problems, treating some of the basic issues and problems associated with clean power, while the later sections focus on preventative measures and solutions to allow an installation to operate with clean power. Finally, the question of static electricity is briefly addressed and some protective measures are suggested.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Hannelore B. Rader

The following annotated bibliography of materials on orienting users to libraries and on instructing them in the use of reference and other resources covers publications…

Abstract

The following annotated bibliography of materials on orienting users to libraries and on instructing them in the use of reference and other resources covers publications from 1981. A few items from 1980 have been included because information about them was not available in time for the 1980 listing. A few items have not been annotated because the compiler was unable to secure copies of these items.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2021

Allyson M. Lunny

Purpose – This chapter has three general purposes: to trace Canada’s hate speech laws from their policy inception to their current state; to identify the importance that…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter has three general purposes: to trace Canada’s hate speech laws from their policy inception to their current state; to identify the importance that media and mass communication have played in the creation and development of Canada’s hate speech laws; and to demonstrate the critical relationship that media has had to significant legal cases on hate speech. Methodology/Approach – This chapter historically maps the policy development of and legal challenges to Canada’s hate speech laws. It takes directed notice of the relationship of media and mass communication to the development and implementation of those laws. It engages with libertarian and egalitarian arguments on free speech throughout the chapter testing these ideas through an examination of the legal cases cited. Findings – Canadian legislators and courts have long grappled with the balancing of rights with respect to the issue of “hate speech.” Advances in mass communication technology have added intricate challenges to that legal balancing. Awareness of media’s allure to hatemongers and racial extremists and of media’s protean characteristics make regulation of its hateful content a continuous legal challenge. Canada’s greatest challenge yet to the regulation of hate speech will be its adaptive response to the growing phenomenon of online hate. Originality/Value – This chapter highlights the little recognized prescient statements made by the Cohen Committee about the allure of media and the dangers of its technological advancements in Canadian free speech debates. Providing a comprehensive survey of Canada’s “hate speech” laws, it recognizes the importance that advancements in mass communication have played in the creation and development of Canada’s “hate speech” laws.

Details

Media and Law: Between Free Speech and Censorship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-729-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Tara J. Shawver and William F. Miller

This chapter assesses the impact of values change on the likelihood of reporting concerns for a situation of fraudulent financial reporting after a Giving Voice to Values…

Abstract

This chapter assesses the impact of values change on the likelihood of reporting concerns for a situation of fraudulent financial reporting after a Giving Voice to Values (GVV) ethics intervention. The GVV curriculum shifts focus away from why actions are unethical to how one may effectively voice their values to resolve ethical conflict. After implementing this program in advanced accounting courses and empirically assessing the impact of the ethics intervention, the authors find that students have a stronger sense of the importance of values prescribed in professional codes of conduct and are more likely to speak up and confront unethical actions by voicing their values. GVV has the potential to increase the number of accounting professionals who are willing to speak up and confront unethical practices. The authors’ study appears to be the first to empirically test how a change in the perception of the importance of values impacts the likelihood to report concerns to members of the management hierarchy, filling an important gap in the literature.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-758-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2001

Abstract

Details

Postmodern Malpractice: A Medical Case Study in The Culture War
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-091-3

Abstract

Details

Postmodern Malpractice: A Medical Case Study in The Culture War
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-091-3

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Axel Schmetzke

The author takes a comprehensive look at the accessibility of e-resources for all people, including those with disabilities, in the context of collection development (CD).

Abstract

Purpose

The author takes a comprehensive look at the accessibility of e-resources for all people, including those with disabilities, in the context of collection development (CD).

Methodology/approach

Employing a combination of research methodologies policy analysis, content analysis, and phone survey—the author explores the extent to which the needs of people with disabilities are considered.

Findings

Several professional library organizations recommend accessibility-sensitive selection and procurement procedures. However, not all students enrolled in library school programs might learn about the issue. Few books on the subject cover the issue adequately. Nationwide, CD policies requiring conformance to accessibility standards are the exception; and when librarians meet to make decisions about the selection of specific e-resources, the needs of people with disabilities are rarely on their radar screens.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers conducting similar surveys in the future might want to not only select a statistically more representative sample of academic libraries but also widen their focus and include both accessibility and usability in their investigations.

Practical implications

Textbook authors and course instructors in the area of CD need to address accessibility and usability. Librarians need to raise the issue with database and e-book vendors during license negotiations.

Social implications

The acquisition of e-resources designed to be accessible and usable for all will enable people with disabilities to participate more fully in our information-driven society.

Originality/value

The data collected provide for a broad discussion of the extent to which the needs of people with disabilities are considered in connection with CD.

Details

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities and the Inclusive Future of Libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-652-6

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Keith Clement, Kimberly M. Tatum, Matthew J. Kruse and Julie C. Kunselman

This paper aims to examine the relationship between law enforcement agency domestic violence standard operating procedures (SOPs) and Florida's model policy for domestic…

2038

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between law enforcement agency domestic violence standard operating procedures (SOPs) and Florida's model policy for domestic violence, as well as type of police agency and policing management model.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study include the SOPs and self‐reported policing model for Florida law enforcement agencies (n=72), which were collected through an e‐mail request to all Florida agencies. The policing model was dichotomized into “traditional policing” and “community oriented policing” styles. Content analysis was used to analyze each agency's SOPs.

Findings

Findings suggest there are no differences in SOP content across “traditional” versus “community oriented policing” policing models. Agencies self‐reporting as community oriented policing agencies were not necessarily any more likely to include preventative or long‐term goals within their domestic violence SOPs than agencies self‐reporting as “traditional” policing agencies. There were also no differences in SOP content across type of police agency.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests that although SOPs are used to formalize policy for officer decision making, they may not be representative of the policing management model of an agency.

Practical implications

Agencies that identify as community policing agencies should examine whether written policies demonstrate an adherence to the core tenets of community policing.

Originality/value

There is no research that examines the link between written domestic violence policies and agency policing models. This paper adds to the extant literature and suggests topics for future research in this area.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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