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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Rose Du Preez, Michael Bendixen and Russell Abratt

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a comprehensive model for the outcomes of internal brand management (IBM), linking it to brand citizenship behavior (BCB…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and test a comprehensive model for the outcomes of internal brand management (IBM), linking it to brand citizenship behavior (BCB) and intention to stay (IS) through job satisfaction (JS) and brand commitment (BC).

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review is undertaken to develop the proposed model. The sample consists of three separate cases, a financial services firm, a multinational telecommunications company, both based in South Africa, and a regional grocery chain operating in the USA. Useable samples of 154, 96 and 241 were achieved for the three cases, respectively. In all cases, the majority of the respondents were customer contact employees.

Findings

The structural models showed some surprising results, the major one being that brand proselytization is not a component of BCB. Despite using the same instrument, the levers that drive IBM were different in each of the three cases and different from previous studies.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research indicate that IBM and BCB are contextual. This implies that a universal instrument to measure these constructs has yet to be developed, representing an interesting avenue for future research.

Practical implications

Regarding employees as internal customers and including them in various marketing initiatives and brand-orientated human resource practices (recruitment, induction and training) are key to a successful IBM program.

Originality/value

A comprehensive model for the outcomes of IBM was developed and tested, linking it to BCB and IS through JS and BC. It is the first time that research has been conducted with customer contact employees only.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Russell Abratt and Justine Cullinan

The subject areas are marketing management and brand management.

Abstract

Subject area

The subject areas are marketing management and brand management.

Study level/applicability

The study is applicable to post-graduate brand management course and post-graduate marketing management course.

Case overview

In December 2015, Justine Cullinan, station manager of 5FM – a commercial, national music-radio station – reviewed the listenership and revenue figures for the year. When she took over as station manager in October 2014, 5FM had been through a three-year period of sharply declining listenership and revenue. Since then, by growing 5FM’s online community and adjusting the station’s overall strategy, the tide of decline had slowed. 5FM’s limited marketing budget prevented it from attracting listeners through traditional marketing avenues. Cullinan wondered how she could grow audiences and revenue and forge a new way for radio to benchmark success in a world where online communities were ever more important.

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of this case, students will understand the following concepts: brand awareness; brand promise; brand communication; and brand revitalisation strategies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 8: Marketing

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Louise Sevel, Russell Abratt and Nicola Kleyn

The purpose of this study is to understand how a large service organisation with a brand portfolio manages its corporate brand relative to its portfolio of product brands.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand how a large service organisation with a brand portfolio manages its corporate brand relative to its portfolio of product brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use an interpretivist research paradigm to investigate four research questions concerning the relative roles of corporate and product brands, the role of the CEO, the structures and capabilities that support the development of brand equity (including the role of the marketing function) and the role of employees in building corporate brand equity. A case study design was used, and the Tsogo Sun, one of the largest hotel and casino organisations in Africa, was the focus of the investigation.

Findings

The findings highlight the important role of both the CEO and the marketing department in optimising brand equity and managing across corporate and product brands. Employees were found to play a critical role and the need to clarify their relative roles as both recipients and expressors of brand identity across corporate and product brands emerged as an important theme.

Originality/value

Although the corporate brand has received much attention in recent years, much of literature remains conceptual. In addition to responding to calls for empirical research, the paper also contributes to deepening understanding about how to manage a corporate brand alongside a number of product brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Justine Alexandra Cullinan, Russell Abratt and Michela Mingione

While there is a growing body of literature about corporate branding, studies of corporate branding in state-owned enterprises (SOEs) are limited despite the important…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a growing body of literature about corporate branding, studies of corporate branding in state-owned enterprises (SOEs) are limited despite the important role they play in many economies. The purpose of this paper is to explore how managers perceive the significance and challenge of corporate brand building and management within a state-owned organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative and interpretative research paradigm was used in the form of a case study design. This study focusses on the South African Broadcasting Corporation where executives and managers responsible for corporate branding decisions were interviewed.

Findings

Findings highlight the specific purposes, decision making factors, stakeholders and brand portfolio of an SOE corporate brand.

Research limitations/implications

Corporate brands help build brand identity and point out that a SOEs' corporate brand identity is dual in nature. The duality of mission, stakeholders and decision making, triggers brand challenges, namely, unclear corporate identity and fragmented corporate brand strategies, which must be carefully orchestrated over time and across stakeholders.

Originality/value

This study highlights the issues state-run enterprises face in building and managing a corporate brand and proposes an original model for SOEs' corporate brand development process.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Stephen Graham Saunders, Mike Bendixen and Russell Abratt

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the banking needs of urban informal poor consumers in South Africa. These consumers find it difficult to obtain…

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1965

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the banking needs of urban informal poor consumers in South Africa. These consumers find it difficult to obtain access to banking products.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of consumers was undertaken in a large informal settlement outside Johannesburg. A qualitative exploratory pilot study was undertaken first to gain a better understanding of these consumers and to develop a research instrument. Second, a quantitative analysis was undertaken among 200 households.

Findings

Banking products used by the sample are discussed as well as all their patronage motives. It was established that the majority of consumers did have a bank account and there was a significant association between having an account and various demographics such as income level, employment status and level of education.

Research limitations/implications

Each informal settlement may have unique characteristics and therefore it may be difficult to generalize the findings.

Practical implications

Banks will have to address the patronage factors of these consumers as they have very different needs when compared to middle and upper income customers. Specify strategies are recommended to bank management.

Originality/value

No study has been done on the banking needs of this segment of the market and very little is known about the urban informal poor in general. This paper gives insight into how banks can play their part in uplifting the poor in societies where they make up large segments of the population.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Anne Daffey and Russell Abratt

This study explores the concept and management of a corporate branding strategy in a large South African bank. The authors review the process that Absa Bank took in…

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Abstract

This study explores the concept and management of a corporate branding strategy in a large South African bank. The authors review the process that Absa Bank took in developing a corporate brand after merging four banks in their group into one new large one. Models of corporate branding are reviewed and then compared with the actual process undertaken by the banks. Interviews were conducted with key managers within the bank as well as in their advertising agency. The results show that Absa bank followed the processes described in the comprehensive models.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Nivea Blackburn, Val Hooper, Russell Abratt and Judy Brown

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which organisations engage with stakeholders about social and environmental issues. The authors establish where the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which organisations engage with stakeholders about social and environmental issues. The authors establish where the designers of these reports source the information reported.

Design/methodology/approach

This was an exploratory study that employed a qualitative research design. Interviews with 24 individuals from 15 organisations in New Zealand that are involved with the writing of sustainability reports were conducted. In addition documents were analysed from a number of organisations to allow for triangulation.

Findings

Findings indicate that engagement with stakeholders was important and one of the main purposes was to have a licence to stay in business. It was also found that managers do prioritise the saliency of issues. Generally, stakeholders do not get involved in the decision making pertaining to environmental issues in organisations.

Research limitations/implications

The sample investigated in this study was relatively small so generalisation of the results would be difficult. However, these in depth interviews did provide insights that can be used in further study using large samples and in different countries.

Originality/value

This is the first time that the designers of annual reports were interviewed. They have knowledge of the extent of stakeholder engagement with firms.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Russell Abratt, Michael Bendixen and Karen Drop

Reports on the ethical beliefs of retail salespeople, managers and executives in South Africa. Little is known about the ethical perceptions of retailers despite the fact…

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1821

Abstract

Reports on the ethical beliefs of retail salespeople, managers and executives in South Africa. Little is known about the ethical perceptions of retailers despite the fact that retailing plays a vital role in the economy. A review of the ethics literature regarding retailing and sales is presented. A survey of 579 retailing employees was undertaken. Findings indicate differences in the ethical beliefs of salespeople when compared to managers. The specific differences are discussed, as well as implications and recommendations for retailers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Shaun Benn, Russell Abratt and Nicola Kleyn

The purpose of this paper is to establish how executive managers in a South African organisation prioritise and manage reputational risks arising from stakeholder claims…

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1289

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish how executive managers in a South African organisation prioritise and manage reputational risks arising from stakeholder claims. The authors establish how corporate reputation and reputational risk fits into their decision making when considering stakeholder claims.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted in-depth interviews with the top management of a South African paint manufacture. They identified eight stakeholder claims and discussed how they assessed and addressed each one.

Findings

Respondents identified highly, moderate, and low salient claims. They reported on how they dealt with these different claims in terms of the attributes of power, legitimacy, and urgency.

Originality/value

This is an empirical theory-testing study of how managers deal with stakeholder claims. The authors establish how corporate reputation and reputational risk fits into their decision making when considering stakeholder claims. The authors suggest that managers must not only understand who their stakeholders are, but need to evaluate the impact of stakeholder claims in order to manage reputational risk.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Hoda Diba, Joseph M. Vella and Russell Abratt

This study aims to explore if and how business-to-business (B2B) companies can use social media to influence the buying process.

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4042

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore if and how business-to-business (B2B) companies can use social media to influence the buying process.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an exploratory approach into the existing literature related to the B2B buying process and its relationship with social media.

Findings

The study shows that companies in a B2B context can use social media as a means of influencing the stages of the buying process by means of using one or more of the seven functional blocks of social media.

Research limitations/implications

The findings demonstrate the relation that exists between each stage of the buyer process in a B2B organization and the functional blocks of social media. This study opens the door for further research into the influence of each of these blocks on the buying process stages and the roles involved.

Practical implications

This study identifies how social media’s blocks influence the different stages and how organizations can use that to their benefit.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated the use of social media in a B2B context. However, not many have looked into the influence of social media in the B2B buying process and buying center. This study looks into the relationship between the buying process stages and social media’s functional blocks as related to the different roles of the buying center.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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