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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Abel Duarte Alonso

Alpaca ownership in New Zealand has been developing in recent years. However, very little academic research has been conducted in this area, particularly from alpaca…

Abstract

Purpose

Alpaca ownership in New Zealand has been developing in recent years. However, very little academic research has been conducted in this area, particularly from alpaca owners' points of view. This exploratory study attempts to close some of the knowledge gaps in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Between April and June 2006, a total of 233 alpaca owners located in both the North and South Islands of New Zealand participated in the study by completing a questionnaire.

Findings

While the overall results confirm the importance of the lifestyle dimension among New Zealand alpaca owners, the existence of many respondents whose operations are open to the public and who own a larger number of alpacas suggests more than just lifestyle motivations, but rather an intention to exploit commercial opportunities in this activity.

Research limitations/implications

There is an acknowledged limitation regarding the quantitative approach used here. Such an approach may have limited the ability to capture insightful perspectives, for example, in the form of respondents' experiences that are unique to qualitative research.

Practical implications

Implications for New Zealand's alpaca ownership include the need for operators and industry bodies to increase their knowledge, particularly their marketing knowledge, in view of the growing volume of alpaca‐related products, such as their fleece.

Originality/value

The study presents insights into a rural activity in New Zealand that so far has received very limited attention from academic research. The exploratory nature of the study also provides an avenue for future studies to further explore small and medium rural enterprises that, as in the case of the alpaca industry, are currently emerging industries.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Habib Alipour, Hamed Rezapouraghdam and Bahareh Hasanzade

This chapter evaluates the effects of second-home phenomena in several cities which, due to their unique spatial characteristics, are the target destination for the people…

Abstract

This chapter evaluates the effects of second-home phenomena in several cities which, due to their unique spatial characteristics, are the target destination for the people who wish to escape routine life. The study setting, the Caspian Sea coastal zone, is endowed with natural comparative advantages due to its lush and green landscape, as well as sun, sea, and sand tourism, and has been experiencing high growth of second homes and village tourism during recent decades. Social exchange and stakeholder theories within the context of sustainable development compose the frame on which this study is based. The findings are discussed and followed with implications and hints for future research.

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Mike Danson and Kathryn Burnett

This chapter contributes to addressing the gap in the literature on entrepreneurs and enterprise in island and remote rural environments.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter contributes to addressing the gap in the literature on entrepreneurs and enterprise in island and remote rural environments.

Approach

The research, policy and practice literature on island enterprises and entrepreneurs is reviewed, taking Scotland as a focus within wider international contexts. Islands – as spaces and cultural places – are recognised in terms of ‘otherness’ and difference, not least in respect of tourism and culture. The importance of distance, isolation and peripherality is discussed as social constructions – myths and narratives – as well as in their mainstream measured equivalences. Agencies and policies are introduced at different levels and given significance reflecting their particular relevance in remote and isolated communities. The significance of the dominant paradigm founded on agglomeration, clusters, connectivity, proximity and competitiveness in the peripheralisation of those establishing and running businesses on islands is explored critically. This is contrasted with experiences from comparative northern European locations of smart specialisation, innovation and resilience, and the underpinning key roles of social capital, relationships and cultural values and norms are identified. Sectoral case studies and enterprise are offered to examine these issues in context.

Findings

As this is an exploratory study, results are neither comprehensive nor definitive. However, they are indicative of how forces and obstacles apply in island and remote rural environments.

Research, practical and social implications

The study confirms the need to recognise social relations locally, and for policies and strategies to be proofed for locational differences.

Details

Exploring Rural Enterprise: New Perspectives On Research, Policy & Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-109-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Dane M. Lee and Tommy Nichols

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges when recruiting and retaining rural physicians and to ascertain methods that make rural physician recruitment and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges when recruiting and retaining rural physicians and to ascertain methods that make rural physician recruitment and retention successful. There are studies that suggest rural roots is an important factor in recruiting rural physicians, while others look at rural health exposure in medical school curricula, self-actualization, community sense and spousal perspectives in the decision to practice rural medicine.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review was performed using Academic Search Complete, PubMed and The Cochrane Collaboration. Key words were rural, rural health, community hospital(s), healthcare, physicians, recruitment, recruiting, retention, retaining, physician(s) and primary care physician(s). Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed full-text articles written in English, published from 1997 and those limited to USA and Canada. Articles from foreign countries were excluded owing to their unique healthcare systems.

Findings

While there are numerous articles that call for special measures to recruit and retain physicians in rural areas, there is an overall dearth. This review identifies several articles that suggest recruitment and retention techniques. There is a need for a research agenda that includes valid, reliable and rigorous analysis regarding formulating and implementing these strategies.

Originality/value

Rural Americans are under-represented when it comes to healthcare and what research there is to assist recruitment and retention is difficult to find. This paper identify the relevant research and highlights key strategies.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Steffen Korsgaard, Sabine Müller and Hanne Wittorff Tanvig

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how rural entrepreneurship engages with place and space. It explores the concept of “rural” as a socio-spatial concept in rural

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how rural entrepreneurship engages with place and space. It explores the concept of “rural” as a socio-spatial concept in rural entrepreneurship and illustrates the importance of distinguishing between ideal types of rural entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses concepts from human geography to develop two ideal types of entrepreneurship in rural areas. Ideal types constitute powerful heuristics for research and are used here to review and link existing literature on rural entrepreneurship and rural development as well as to develop new research avenues.

Findings

Two ideal types are developed: first, entrepreneurship in the rural and second, rural entrepreneurship. The former represents entrepreneurial activities with limited embeddedness enacting a profit-oriented and mobile logic of space. The latter represents entrepreneurial activities that leverage local resources to re-connect place to space. While both types contribute to local development, the latter holds the potential for an optimized use of the resources in the rural area, and these ventures are unlikely to relocate even if economic rationality would suggest it.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual distinction allows for engaging more deeply with the diversity of entrepreneurial activities in rural areas. It increases our understanding of localized entrepreneurial processes and their impact on local economic development.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of the localized processes of entrepreneurship and how these processes are enabled and constrained by the immediate context or “place”. The paper weaves space and place in order to show the importance of context for entrepreneurship, which responds to the recent calls for contextualizing entrepreneurship research and theories. In addition ideal types can be a useful device for further research and serve as a platform for developing rural policies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Djavlonbek Kadirov and Arti Triveni

The aim of this research is to explore how and why different migrant groups see different values in places they move to. Understanding these values and also the conditions…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to explore how and why different migrant groups see different values in places they move to. Understanding these values and also the conditions in which these values are shaped will help in targeting marketing effort.

Design/methodology/approach

The hierarchical and K‐means cluster analyses were instrumental in identifying different migrant clusters. Planned contrasts were employed to compare related pairs of clusters. The logistic regression analysis identified several determinants of cluster membership likelihood.

Findings

Four different internal migrant clusters are identified in the Hawke's Bay region of New Zealand. These are Material Success Seekers, Community/Environment Folks, Apathetics, and All‐rounders. The former two express a fragmentalist lifestyle. Material Success Seekers emphasise regional business opportunities while being indifferent to social and natural resources. In contrast, Community/Environment Folks emphasise social and natural resources while maintaining indifference to business opportunities. In turn, the latter two clusters make up a holistic lifestyle: All‐rounders consider all three major characteristics of the region to be important while apathetics totally deemphasise these characteristics. The planned contrasts show that demographics are instrumental in predicting differences between related clusters but not helpful in distinguishing the identified lifestyles.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this investigation is that the important constructs used to cluster migrants are not well calibrated, although the reliability scores appear to be satisfactory. Moreover, the use of four‐point importance scales does not allow attaining a greater level of construct sensitivity. The research method is unique in a sense that the cluster analysis and the planned contrasts are applied to examine contrasting values of migrant collectivities.

Practical implications

A number of specific practical challenges need to be resolved by the regional decision makers in order to enhance place satisfaction by internal migrant collectivities. First, the regional and city councils will need to tailor different services, facilities, and public spaces to appeal to different requirements of migrant clusters. Second, the region's settlement support agency should provide migrants with relevant, focused, and differentiated information about available services and resources to suit their various life goals, aspirations, and values.

Originality/value

This investigation tackles the problem of lacking theoretical and empirical research foundation on internal migration as a marketing phenomenon. Moreover, it is unique in its approach of conceptualising migrant segments as cultural phenomena, that is, interdependent collectivities that form on the basis of contrasting values.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Omneya A. Marzouk

The study aims to investigate the differences among urban and rural consumers in terms of their energy and water sustainable consumption behaviour levels and drivers and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to investigate the differences among urban and rural consumers in terms of their energy and water sustainable consumption behaviour levels and drivers and also empirically blueprint conceptual frameworks highlighting urban and rural consumer drivers to consume sustainably.

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows an exploratory design using a qualitative approach; 14 in-depth interviews followed by one focus group were conducted with urban consumers; on the other hand, 18 in-depth interviews followed by one focus group were conducted with rural consumers.

Findings

The findings show that no differences exist among urban and rural consumers in terms of both their sustainable consumption levels and their drivers to consume sustainably; such findings were encapsulated in the form of one conceptual framework pertinent to both urban and rural consumers; it has the following relevant factors: consumers’ attitudes toward conservation, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, self-preference, public media influence, perceived economic value and perceived moral obligation to be relevant antecedents of conservation behaviour, which – in turn – drives sustainable purchase behaviours with the moderating effect of socio-demographic variables.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to extant literature as it provides evidence for the drivers of sustainable consumption behaviours of urban versus rural consumers in emerging countries; it also tentatively answers the question of whether the socio-demographic variables infer a difference in consumers’ sustainable consumption; finally, it studies sustainable consumption from a novel perspective with a focus on the relationship between its two pillars.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2022

Richard Kwasi Bannor, Helena Oppong-Kyeremeh, Bismark Amfo and Ada Adoley Allotey

The authors investigate cocoa farmers' willingness and motivation to participate in agritourism entrepreneurship in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors investigate cocoa farmers' willingness and motivation to participate in agritourism entrepreneurship in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were obtained from 583 cocoa farmers. Contingent valuation method, ordered probit and truncated regressions were employed.

Findings

Cocoa farmers' willingness to participate in agritourism was high. The minimum fee farmers were willing to charge per tourist per day ranged from US$0.870 to US$6.957. Agritourism products farmers were willing to offer to tourists are interaction with rural folks, indigenous cuisine, quality locally stored drinking water, indigenous primary healthcare and on-site restrooms. Cocoa farmers' motivations to participate in agritourism are income generation, alternative livelihood strategy and education. Education, being a native, farm size, motorable roads to farm, and distance to farm influence minimum fee farmers were willing to accept to participate in agritourism.

Research limitations/implications

Agritourism could be considered in rural and tourism development policies of developing countries.

Originality/value

The authors investigate cocoa farmers' participation in agritourism, motivations and determinants of willingness to participate.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 82 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 January 2020

Smitu Malhotra and Venugopal Pingali

The purpose of this paper is to review Indian management-school programs that integrate social and environmental concerns in the curriculum.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review Indian management-school programs that integrate social and environmental concerns in the curriculum.

Approach

The paper analyses the data provided in the form of reports submitted by students after the rural immersion program and draws inferences from the written material.

Findings

This paper illustrates the usefulness of the rural immersion program in sensitizing students about the social divide that exists in India; thus, it helps inculcate an inclusive mind-set.

Practical implications

This paper emphasizes the usefulness of creating a management curriculum that integrates societal issues in the learning process.

Originality/value

The paper discusses how a top Indian business school is attempting to develop socially-responsible managers.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Natalia Vorobiova, Patrícia Pinto, Pedro Pintassilgo and Joice Lavandoski

This paper addresses the motivations of tourists who visit the region of La Rioja, Spain, which is well known for its internationally recognized, high-quality wines, yet…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper addresses the motivations of tourists who visit the region of La Rioja, Spain, which is well known for its internationally recognized, high-quality wines, yet remains understudied as a wine tourism destination. The paper aims to ascertain whether tourists are attracted to La Rioja because of its famous wines and wine-related activities or if other motivations exist.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were derived from 217 questionnaires regarding tourists’ motivations. A tourist survey was applied in La Rioja’s capital city, Logroño, and segmentation analysis was undertaken. The data were first grouped into five factors regarding motivations for one’s visit. These factors were then used to create two clusters: “wine tourists” and “other tourists”.

Findings

The results enabled us to detect different segments of tourists. The existence of two clusters suggests that tourists are motivated to visit the region for various reasons that are not necessarily wine-related. Thus, the region should be marketed to tourists beyond the theme of wine, as there is a demand for diverse experiences.

Originality/value

Using the push and pull theory, this study contributes to the literature on the profile of visitors to wine tourism destinations by identifying differences in terms of motivations and other personal characteristics between “wine tourists” and the “other tourists”. It also adds to the few existing studies on wine tourism segmentation in Spain through its focus on La Rioja, which is one of the most famous Spanish wine tourism destinations.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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