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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

R.K. Jena and Yogesh Dwivedi

Tourism is one of the upcoming service industry in India with high potentials for future growth, particularly in rural areas. Many potential barriers are affecting the…

Abstract

Purpose

Tourism is one of the upcoming service industry in India with high potentials for future growth, particularly in rural areas. Many potential barriers are affecting the growth of tourism in rural India. Therefore, it is essential to explore and prioritize the barriers to tourism growth in rural India.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative responses from “16” experts related to tourism and hospitality management from central India are collected for this study. An integrated Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) based framework is adopted to identify and relate significant barriers to tourism growth in India.

Findings

The result of the study identified many significant barriers and their importance to tourism growth in rural India.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study add to the knowledge base of tourism research in line with the previous literature. This study offers an in-depth understanding of barriers focusing on rural tourism growth and devising both the plan of action and the suggestive measures in dealing with rural tourism.

Originality/value

The study provides a robust framework by integrating Interpretive Structural Modelling(ISM) and Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) to explore and prioritizing the critical barriers to rural tourism growth in India. The results of this study can help the decision-maker to fundamentally improve the economy of India through the growth of rural tourism.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Sanjaya Kumar Lenka and Rajesh Barik

The purpose of this study is to measure the availability, accessibility and usability of financial products and services in both rural and urban India from 1991 to 2014.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to measure the availability, accessibility and usability of financial products and services in both rural and urban India from 1991 to 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses principal component analysis (PCA) method to construct financial inclusion index that serves as a proxy variable for indicating the inclusiveness of financial products and services among the rural and urban people. To fulfill this objective, the study proposes separate indexes of financial inclusion for both rural and urban India from 1991 to 2014. The paper uses annual time series data from 1991 to 2014 to construct the rural-urban financial inclusion index. The used data have been collected from the basic statistical returns of Reserve Bank of India and Economic Political Weekly research foundation.

Findings

The study inferences that though there is a remarkable increase in financial inclusion in India from 1991 onwards, it does not result in sizeable growth of financial access to rural masses in comparison to urban masses. The rural India does not substantiate an equivalent growth to that of urban India, contrasting a perceptible increase in financial inclusion. The finding of this study will help the researchers and policymakers to understand the status of financial inclusion in the context of both rural and urban India. Furthermore, policymakers can take appropriate policy initiatives to fulfill the financial inclusion gap that exists between rural and urban people. Additionally, the proposed index is easy to compute and can be used to make comparison across countries for further studies.

Originality/value

The present paper attempts to include all possible dimensions (and indicators within a dimension) that have been considered so far by various authors. Therefore, the authors hope that this index will be more indicative and accurate than previous index. Again, the authors propose to use PCA for the first time to assign the weight of factors in the financial inclusion index for rural and urban India separately.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Praveen Kulkarni, Rohit Mutkekar, Shashidhar Chiniwar and Sanjeev Ingalagi

The purpose of this paper is to provide the insights on the challenges influencing rural start-ups. It provides insights with regards to managerial, operational, marketing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide the insights on the challenges influencing rural start-ups. It provides insights with regards to managerial, operational, marketing and finance-related challenges influencing the rural start-ups in the study. The study aims to expand the domain of start-ups by including a broader range of challenges and related aspects found in the start-up literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an exploratory study using the open-ended approach of grounded theory, including 61 rural start-ups operating in Karnataka, India. The data were analysed through non-parametric test to understand the comparison between different sectors of rural start-ups.

Findings

It suggests that marketing techniques and infrastructure challenges influences the rural start-ups. Therefore, success of start-ups is influenced by these related variables.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Researchers are therefore encouraged to test the proposed propositions further in the area of challenges and growth in the domain of managerial, infrastructure, marketing, finance, human resource and logistics in rural start-ups. The study is restricted to rural start-ups located in districts of Karnataka, India.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for managing the challenges for enhancing the growth of start-ups. The paper provides insights on the significant challenges witnessed by the start-ups and provides directions for the growth of start-ups.

Social implications

This paper fulfils an identified need of the start-ups in rural sector and contribute to the growth of start-ups in rural sector of India.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how rural start-ups operate and create a niece in the growth of Indian economy.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

B.N. Ghosh

The magnitude of rural poverty is larger as compared to urban poverty in India. The basic explanation for sectoral poverty differentiates in India is the misallocation of…

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Abstract

The magnitude of rural poverty is larger as compared to urban poverty in India. The basic explanation for sectoral poverty differentiates in India is the misallocation of resources and urban‐biased strategy of development. Investment allocation in Indian planning is not strictly based on the consideration of equity and economic efficiency. The rural sector gets the smaller share of investible resources, and therefore rural income, output and employment fall short of the optimum level, and rural poverty intensifies.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2017

Anandajit Goswami, Kaushik Ranjan Bandyopadhyay and Atul Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of rural energy transition in cooking options in India. Although India is aiming to achieve a double-digit economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of rural energy transition in cooking options in India. Although India is aiming to achieve a double-digit economic growth, a large share of rural households still rely on firewood for cooking which not only has serious repercussions of increasing indoor pollution but also has a concomitant adverse effect on women and child morbidity and mortality. However, transition to clean energy options like improved cookstoves for these households may not be necessarily linear. It is often driven or resisted by latent factors such as caste, trust, social capital, information flow, social positioning of clusters that are deeply embedded in the social and cultural norms and values specific to local rural contexts. This has been shown in the present case study that pertains to eight villages in the remote and deprived Purnea district of Bihar and the need for internalizing them in the macro energy policymaking has been established in the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies a macro foundation research that is complemented by micro foundation tools of fuzzy cognitive mapping-based mental model framework to achieve the purpose of the study. Focused-group discussions and interviews are also conducted to establish the narrative of the paper.

Findings

Caste, socio-political position, asset structure, remoteness, culture and technology access affect rural households’ decision making capability that is related to shifting from using the traditionalmeans of firewood and biomass based traditional cookstoves for cooking to adopting improved clean cooking stoves which will enable the transition toward the use of clean rural energy in the eight villages in Bihar chosen for this study.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the paper have larger implications for the broader macro energy policymaking in the country by taking into account the non-linear, latent factors of village contexts.

Practical implications

The research will help energy policymakers in decision-making and will guide the implementation process of national- and state-level policies on rural energy transition in India.

Social implications

The findings of the paper will help the smoother implementation of national- and state-level rural energy transition policies for cooking, creating developmental dividends for rural Indian households.

Originality/value

The research is new with regard to the application of non-deterministic fuzzy cognitive mapping-based mental model approach to contribute to the country’s national- and state-level rural energy transition policies.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Ashutosh Pandey and Arvind Mohan

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in reducing Infant Mortality in India. The study will help the government in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in reducing Infant Mortality in India. The study will help the government in deciding its future course of action regarding the infant mortality rate (IMR) reduction in India.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the interrupted time series analysis (ITSA) approach with a control group to study the role of NRHM in reducing the IMR in India. The authors examined infant mortality in rural areas of India for the level and trend change before and after the implementation of NRHM. The authors then applied a suitable ARMA model to estimate the coefficients of the regression model. From the estimated results, the study predicts the counterfactuals for both the rural IMR and urban IMR and plots the results.

Findings

The study found the evidence supporting the hypotheses that the NRHM has led to a reduction in the difference between urban IMR and rural IMR. The research shows that the rural IMR declined at steeper rates in the post-NRHM period (2005–2015).

Originality/value

None of the existing studies analyses the impact of a social scheme like NRHM on the reduction of IMR in India by applying the ITSA. The study is unique as it estimates the counterfactuals and plots the results which show the impact of NRHM on reducing IMR.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Sougata Ray

Post-independence, the rural credit market in India has undergone significant structural changes in order to enhance the availability and efficient use of credit. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-independence, the rural credit market in India has undergone significant structural changes in order to enhance the availability and efficient use of credit. The purpose of this paper is to understand the challenges and changes in the Indian rural credit market in the post-independence period.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the All India Debt and Investment Survey conducted by the National Sample Survey Organisation of the Government of India from 1971–1972 to 2012 and Reserve Bank of India in 1951–1952 and 1961–1962, the study focuses on three important aspect of rural credit market, i.e. the availability, sources and uses of credit. The analysis is based on both the national and state level data and uses the decadal growth rates to explain the changes in the rural credit market.

Findings

Availability of credit, in terms of volume and number of households indebted, has increased substantially. However, the sharp rise in outstanding debt is a matter of concern. The share of credit from institutional agencies has seen a continuous decline post liberalisation. The non-institutional agencies, particularly the professional moneylenders, continue to be the most preferred sources of credit owing to their flexible nature of operation. Interesting, microfinance has emerged as a major source of credit particularly for the poor rural households. The rise in credit usage for non-income generating activities amongst poor households is another important concern.

Originality/value

The study highlights some of the most important features and characteristics associated with the Indian rural credit market. An understanding of these issues would provide valuable insight for shaping the future policy responses.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 79 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2022

Veena Suresh, Ram Fishman, Johanna Sophie von Lieres and Bhavani R. Rao

The purpose of the study is to understand what impact the first COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 had on the income and food security of rural households in India and whether it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to understand what impact the first COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 had on the income and food security of rural households in India and whether it differed across socioeconomic factors. Moreover, the study assesses the needs of rural households and determines whether they had received adequate support services during the lockdown.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a repeated-measures quantitative survey design with 1,319 rural women from 16 states of India and conducted a telephonic survey.

Findings

The lockdown had directly impacted rural households' employment status and income but the impact differed depending on the type of employment. For example, working in a salaried job or on one's farm led to a lower likelihood of a complete decline in income in states other than Kerala as the lockdown continued. The study also revealed a change in the pattern of food consumption, with higher consumption of subsidized staple foods. It also became evident that the aid announced by the government reached the rural population with some delay.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study was that many respondents refused to participate in phase 2, which reduced the sample size when comparing the two phases because the women did not own mobile phones. Instead, they were using their husbands' phones.

Originality/value

The study's findings can help better understand the needs of rural populations during crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This can help to plan better and build preventive actions for such populations once their needs are understood. In addition, this can aid disadvantaged people for a minimal level of preparedness and security during such a crisis in the future.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Atul Gupta, Ipseeta Satpathy, B. Chandra Mohan Patnaik and Niharika Patel

Health is an important issue in our life. A person with good health will have peace of mind and will be able to contribute to nation-building. We cannot expect performance…

Abstract

Purpose

Health is an important issue in our life. A person with good health will have peace of mind and will be able to contribute to nation-building. We cannot expect performance from an ill person with a low morale. In the present paper, the authors tried to understand the ground realities of health-care facilities provided in India and more specifically in Odisha, India.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical paper used a non-experimental design to test a proposed model based on a review of relevant literature. In this paper, an initial pilot study was conducted by taking 44 various variables; however, after the study and taking the expert opinion, the variables were restricted to only 30. For the purpose of study, only state-sponsored hospitals were considered on a random sampling method.

Findings

The analysis of data is conducted on a simple percentage method with closed-end options. It is found that even after 67 years of independence, people do not have access to basic medical care facilities in the rural areas and to some extent in semi-urban areas also. The major stumbling block is inadequate infrastructure in these hospitals.

Research limitations/implications

While this study offers some insight into the status of healthcare infrastructure in rural India, the sample was limited to respondents in state-sponsored hospitals, which may not represent the views about private hospitals.

Practical implications

It seems that in some interior areas of Odisha, people rely more on their fate than then these health-care services.

Social implications

Various governments claim that they are spending millions of rupees on health-care service, but the benefits are not being felt by the masses. We are sure that our attempt to highlight the scenario of health-care services in the state of Odisha will be an eye opener and will compel the various stake holders to introspect their involvement in the health-care services provided in these areas.

Originality/value

A considerable amount of research has been done evaluating the status of healthcare in India, but this is the first empirical research study to date based on respondents from the rural parts of the state of Odisha in India. Some of these areas are not reachable to researchers due to the poor infrastructure. This contribution is also of special importance amid the recent criticism of the healthcare infrastructure in India by prominent management scholars.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Siriginidi Subba Rao

Discusses the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for rural communities. Highlights the factors preventing rural communities from reaping the…

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4021

Abstract

Discusses the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for rural communities. Highlights the factors preventing rural communities from reaping the benefits of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and technological innovations to access them. Defines community information systems and lists selected successful models outside India. Despite the limitations in basic infrastructure and low‐level penetration of information technology in India, more than 50 grassroots projects are using modern ICTs for the benefit of rural communities. Describes selected community projects in India. Also identifies the bottlenecks in, possible solutions for and observations of the initiatives of rural projects. Concludes that creating information‐rich societies is a key element of poverty reduction and sustainable development. Community network centres can play a key role in meeting the socio‐economic aspirations of rural communities by successfully addressing the “eight Cs” of success in the digital age: connectivity, content, community, commerce, capacity, culture, co‐operation and capital.

Details

info, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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