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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Rosemary Polegato and Rune Bjerke

This paper aims to explore the nature and relationships among the dimensions that constitute expectations, anticipation and post-experience assessment of cultural events…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the nature and relationships among the dimensions that constitute expectations, anticipation and post-experience assessment of cultural events, before and after an aesthetic experience, namely, a live Norwegian opera or ballet performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangulation approach is used to combine qualitative and quantitative analyses. Quantitative data collection was conducted at the site before and after a performance experience.

Findings

Expectations, anticipation and post-experience assessment are found to be multi-dimensional. Expectations and anticipation are identified as distinct constructs. Three dimensions of expectations of quality are extrinsic cues: building and functional attributes, available services and level of employee service. In addition, two dimensions of pre-experience anticipation are identified: anticipation of information gathering activities and anticipation of the event. Post-experience assessment has two dimensions: satisfaction and pride in the building. Two post-experience associations are enthusiasm and inclusiveness. Anticipation of the event and enthusiasm, not expectations, are found to be predictors of satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

An understanding of the role of anticipation in consumer engagement and satisfaction with aesthetic experiences could be broadened and enriched by studies that include other service or arts disciplines and within a more complex model of consumer engagement.

Originality/value

Anticipation is a significant pre-experience phenomenon. Enthusiasm is identified as a post-experience association.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Rune Bjerke and Nicholas Ind

The purpose of this paper is to explore new constructs related to organizations, art and physical environment. Further, an intention was to explain and discuss whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore new constructs related to organizations, art and physical environment. Further, an intention was to explain and discuss whether investments in the physical environment in the form of art, design and architecture do have an effect on employees.

Design/methodology/approach

To conclude whether aesthetics had an impact on employees in terms of job satisfaction, motivation and their self-perception of their own ability to provide customer service, the authors undertook a quantitative study of 222 employees in seven companies. The authors subsequently commenced five in-depth, semi-structured interviews with four accessible corporate art buyers and one curator to identify the main motivations for purchasing art and placing it in the work place.

Findings

With regard to perceptions of art, design and architecture, the physical environment is perceived as a whole and seems to play a significant role in organizational life for employees in companies that have invested in art. The research implies, however, that the companies that invested in art, design and architecture, despite the positive influence on employees’ self-perceived service ability, did not accumulate benefits on service ability relative to employees in companies without art.

Practical implications

Managers should cautiously reflect on their motivations for investing in art, design and architecture. Useful motivations might include projecting a desired external image or decoration or expressing connection to a community. Investing in art, design and architecture independent of what the organization is trying to do strategically will create cosmetic solutions that lack any wider purpose.

Originality/value

Despite increased corporate interest in aesthetics, little research has been done to determine the effect on employees. The research shortage may be due to the challenge of understanding the meaning of the visible expressions. This paper is a contribution to strengthen the knowledge of the impact of workspace aesthetics on employees (the authors subsequently undertook five in-depth, semi-structured interviews with four accessible corporate art buyers at Storebrand (insurance and banking corporation), Telenor (mobile operator), Hydro (aluminium company), Nordic Choice Hotels and one curator).

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Rune Bjerke, Nicholas Ind and Donatella De Paoli

This paper sets out to explore the impact of aesthetics on employee satisfaction and motivation.

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8325

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explore the impact of aesthetics on employee satisfaction and motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on organisational aesthetics and organisational culture theory and interviews with employees at Norwegian telecommunications company Telenor – a significant investor in art, design and architecture.

Findings

There are potential connections between artifacts (as an expression of organisational culture) and employee satisfaction, identity, mood, creativity and motivation. Aesthetics seems to be particularly important to employees working with the business segment because of the face‐to‐face interaction between employees and customers. It appears that the “visual Telenor” influences employees' identification with the organisation.

Practical implications

When organisations invest in art, design and architecture, they need to be active in engaging employees with its meaning and relevance. If employees are not engaged, the aesthetic environment will not stimulate creativity or influence job satisfaction and motivation.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper have enabled the creation of a matrix with four different categories defined by the degree of financial investments in art, design and architecture and the extent of investments in activities engaging employees. A conceptual model is proposed that identifies possible connections between aesthetics and employee performance.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Demetris Vrontis and Petros Lois

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325

Abstract

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Abstract

Details

10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-051-1

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