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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Rubin Pillay

One of the major challenges facing health systems in developing countries is the international migration of professional nurses, coupled with migration from rural to urban…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the major challenges facing health systems in developing countries is the international migration of professional nurses, coupled with migration from rural to urban areas and gravitation to the private sector from the public sector. This study aims to determine what the future work plans of professional nurses in South Africa are and to determine appropriate, contextually relevant strategies to retain nurses where they are needed most.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross‐sectional survey of professional nurses conducted throughout South Africa using a pre‐tested and self‐administered questionnaire. A total of 569 professional nurses participated in the study.

Findings

Of the respondents, 34.8 percent indicated an intention to change their sector of employment within the next five years while only 30.2 percent reported that they would most likely be still in their current positions as professional nurses in five years' time. Younger nurses, nurses in the public sector and nurses from the more rural provinces were also significantly less likely to be in their current positions within the next five years. Public sector nurses felt that employment security, workplace organisation and the working environment were the most important factors. Private sector nurses, however, rated workplace organisation, employment security and professional practice as being most important.

Originality/value

The paper presents evidence that health provision in South Africa is facing an imminent crisis with the overwhelming majority of nurses planning to leave their current positions. The findings suggest that most nurses, irrespective of whether they intend to stay or leave, feel that the same issues need to be addressed if they are to be persuaded to remain in their current positions. This implies that a homogeneous approach could be adopted across sectors and geographic regions to promote health organisations in a more attractive way to nurses.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Rubin Pillay

This paper aims to determine the extent of work satisfaction among general practitioners and to examine the variables influencing the different aspects of their work satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the extent of work satisfaction among general practitioners and to examine the variables influencing the different aspects of their work satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a cross‐sectional survey of general practitioners in the private sector, conducted throughout South Africa, using a self‐administered questionnaire. Univariate statistical models were used to evaluate levels of satisfaction with various facets of work, while inferences about the effect of several independent variables on the work satisfaction facets were drawn from multiple regression models using a stepwise regression procedure.

Findings

Doctors were satisfied with the social and personal aspects of their work and dissatisfied with the practice environment pressures and work setting issues. Overall, doctors were dissatisfied with their work and their careers. Being female, working in large groups, having been in practice for 20 years or more, having a high proportion of insured patients and being incentivised to conserve resources were significant predictors of lower overall satisfaction. Clinical freedom, positive perceptions of managed care strategies, remuneration on a fee‐for‐service basis and working in small groups were predictors of greater overall satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper shows that, although doctors were generally dissatisfied, there are opportunities for enhancing work satisfaction and care provision if policymakers, administrators and health care managers work in collaboration with doctors to provide the specific working conditions that health professionals desire.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Rubin Pillay

The purpose of this paper is to address the problem of providing managers in both the public and private sectors with the requisite competencies to help address…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the problem of providing managers in both the public and private sectors with the requisite competencies to help address efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness in the delivery of health services.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross sectional survey using a self administered questionnaire was conducted among hospital managers in South Africa. Respondents were asked to rate the level of importance that each proposed competency had in their job and to indicate their perceptions about the adequacy of health management training programs in South Africa.

Findings

Hospital managers in both sectors feel that people management and self management skills are the most valuable for the efficient and effective management of hospitals, followed by “hard management skills” and skills related to the ability to think strategically. Specific skills or knowledge related to health care delivery were perceived to be least important. Public sector managers were also more likely to seek future training, and were also more adamant about the need for future management development programs.

Originality/value

This research provides the evidence that there is a great need, as well as a significant demand, for a degree program in health management at South African institutions. The findings will be useful in the conceptualization, design and delivery of health management programs aimed at enhancing current and future management and leadership capacity in the health sector.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2016

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in the Study of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-651-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Gregory Bott

Positivist deductive research on transformational leadership brings along with it 25 years of researcher presuppositions. Such research not only suggests that a…

Abstract

Purpose

Positivist deductive research on transformational leadership brings along with it 25 years of researcher presuppositions. Such research not only suggests that a transformational leader’s influence is unidirectional but also that transformational leadership theory is a universal theory. In this chapter, I inductively seek to examine board-executive director interactions, free from the shackles of existing theory.

Methodology/approach

The current chapter uses an inductive research approach to the collection and analysis of the empirical material. By being open to surprises in the empirical material, I am able to explore behaviors and relationships, while analyzing a specific context – the nonprofit board-executive director relationship.

Findings

The current study finds evidence that individualized consideration in a governance model frequently occurs in the opposite direction. Despite organizational documents promoting a hierarchical structure, evidence of top-down, collegiality, and bottom-up individualized consideration suggests hierarchical boundaries are commonly crossed in the decision making process.

Research implications

Results of this exploratory study suggest that in a governance context, hierarchical actors do not fit neatly into the boxes defined by 30 years of research on transformational leadership theory, suggesting that the leadership process is more complex than portrayed by current dichotomizations. The findings provide support for recent criticisms of transformational leadership theory.

Practical implications

The findings of this chapter provide evidence of the benefits of eliciting input from organizational actors at multiple hierarchical levels. The empirical evidence provides practitioners with a fresh perspective on board roles and relationship, diverging from the traditional structural prescriptions.

Details

Governance and Performance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-107-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Dawn Cable and Chris Patel

The objective of this paper is to contribute to the accounting education literature by demonstrating that there are significant differences in judgments between Australian…

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to contribute to the accounting education literature by demonstrating that there are significant differences in judgments between Australian and Chinese subjects studying within an Australian university with respect to an important issue in accounting, namely, aggressive financial reporting practices. Aggressive financial reporting is the exercise of professional judgment by accountants (including students preparing for a career in accounting) that fails to depict ‘financial reality’. Our study provides some evidence on the influence of culture (operationalised as one's ethnic background), as well as a personal belief variable, ‘belief in a just world’, on students acceptance of aggressive financial reporting practices. The results have implications for improving accounting education. We suggest that assumptions about uniformity in perceiving Western notions of independence and objectivity embedded in official national and international accounting pronouncements are reflections of ‘culture‐blindness’. Additionally, we suggest that accounting educators may like to ensure that the meanings intended in the official accounting pronouncements which are used as primary teaching material are conveyed to students within specific cultural contexts. Moreover, accounting educators and students need to pay greater attention to the role of various contextual factors in the international accounting harmonisation process.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Frank Walter and Heike Bruch

The relevance of affective factors in the charismatic leadership process has been widely acknowledged in leadership research. Building on this notion, the present study…

Abstract

The relevance of affective factors in the charismatic leadership process has been widely acknowledged in leadership research. Building on this notion, the present study empirically investigated the role of leaders’ positive mood and emotional intelligence in the development of charismatic leadership behaviors. We developed hypotheses linking these constructs and tested them in a sample of 34 leaders and their 165 direct followers from a multinational corporation. Results showed that both leaders’ positive mood and leaders’ emotional intelligence were positively related to their charismatic leadership behaviors, as rated by followers. Further, we found leaders’ emotional intelligence to moderate the relationship between leaders’ positive mood and their charismatic leadership behaviors. Emotionally intelligent leaders exhibited charismatic leadership behaviors to a high extent, largely irrespective of their degree of positive mood. In contrast, leaders low on emotional intelligence were more likely to exhibit charismatic behaviors when their positive mood was high, while they were less likely to exhibit such behaviors when their positive mood was low. We conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for leadership theory, research, and practice.

Details

Functionality, Intentionality and Morality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1414-0

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2013

Abstract

Details

The Development of Higher Education in Africa: Prospects and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-699-6

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Anne-Maria Holma

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial…

Abstract

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial network approach (see, e.g., Axelsson & Easton, 1992; Håkansson & Snehota, 1995a). The study describes how adaptations initiate, how they progress, and what the outcomes of these adaptations are. Furthermore, the framework takes into account how adaptations spread in triadic relationship settings. The empirical context is corporate travel management, which is a chain of activities where an industrial enterprise, and its preferred travel agency and service supplier partners combine their resources. The scientific philosophy, on which the knowledge creation is based, is realist ontology. Epistemologically, the study relies on constructionist processes and interpretation. Case studies with in-depth interviews are the main source of data.

Details

Deep Knowledge of B2B Relationships within and Across Borders
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-858-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2013

Abstract

Details

Transformational and Charismatic Leadership: The Road Ahead 10th Anniversary Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-600-2

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