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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2012

James M. Kauffman, Andrew Bruce and John Wills Lloyd

We review the concept of response to intervention (RtI) as it is being applied to emotional and behavioral disorders (EDB) in the early part of the 21st century, examining…

Abstract

We review the concept of response to intervention (RtI) as it is being applied to emotional and behavioral disorders (EDB) in the early part of the 21st century, examining how it differs from and incorporates features of other approaches to addressing those problems, including pre-referral interventions, applied behavior analysis, functional behavioral assessment, curriculum-based measurement, positive behavioral interventions and supports, and special education. After discussing alternative concepts about how RtI might be applied to students with EBD, we note that our search of the literature revealed very few studies examining the application of RtI with students having EBD. We found both substantive and methodological problems in the studies we reviewed. For example, researchers did not describe adequately how students were selected for tiers, what dependent measures were chosen and why, what independent variables were manipulated, what criteria led to moving a child to a different tier, and how RtI addressed (or failed to address) the need for special education services. We conclude that, although some of the components of RtI have solid evidentiary bases, little evidence supports common claims of the benefits of RtI, especially as applied to students with EBD.

Details

Behavioral Disorders: Practice Concerns and Students with EBD
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-507-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Camilla Nilvius

This article theoretically analyzes how response to intervention (RTI) can be used as a tool in lesson study (LS) to enhance student learning and how RTI can be made more…

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1192

Abstract

Purpose

This article theoretically analyzes how response to intervention (RTI) can be used as a tool in lesson study (LS) to enhance student learning and how RTI can be made more user-friendly by teachers in LS. The focus is on how RTI can be adapted to teachers' daily work by including it in the LS model and how LS can benefit by introducing a scientific approach in analyzing student learning outcomes through RTI. The article also highlights how this approach can contribute to learning for children with special educational needs (SEN).

Design/methodology/approach

This theoretical paper describes and compares the characteristics of the LS model with the RTI framework. The comparison highlights the design of models related to teachers’ development and learning outcomes. The benefits and challenges with the models are described. A previous research study related to the models is also briefly reviewed.

Findings

There are benefits and challenges with both the RTI and LS models but parts of the models appear to complement one another to some extent. Teachers' professional development and a better control of learning outcomes could be gained by combining the models. This could also lead to educational improvement.

Originality/value

There has been almost no research about a combined LS and RTI model.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Shalini Singh and Bhaskar Karn

The purpose of this paper is to study the evolution of Freedom of Information/Right to Information from an international perspective and analyse it as an indispensable…

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1343

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the evolution of Freedom of Information/Right to Information from an international perspective and analyse it as an indispensable tool for good governance through the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) with special reference to India.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the worldwide occurrence of Right to Information with reference to International Covenants, the genesis of RTI Act in India and the use of ICT in India as a tool for empowering the citizen's.

Findings

The study demonstrates that RTI has far reaching impact and it clearly contributes to a better and informed citizenry however the use of ICT in India can further facilitate the access of such records.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on the genesis of RTI from an international perspective but the use of ICT for further facilitating the use of RTI is limited to Indian context.

Practical implications

The paper will outline a detailed analysis on the present usage of ICT and the initiatives taken for facilitating information dissemination and further provide suggestions for the benefit of civil society towards good governance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to address the issue of the implementation of right to information act through the use of ICT and also suggests methodology for its further improvement. Also, the study comprehends the genesis of RTI both from the international as well as Indian perspective.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Ola Johansson and Daniel Hellström

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework of the potential benefits of asset visibility in the context of returnable transport items (RTI), and uses the…

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2271

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework of the potential benefits of asset visibility in the context of returnable transport items (RTI), and uses the framework to examine the effect of asset visibility on the management of RTI systems.

Design/methodology/approach

A combined case study and simulation approach was used. A case study was performed to identify and understand how an existing RTI system is managed, while discrete‐event simulation was the method chosen to explore the potential effect of asset visibility.

Findings

The paper identifies cost aspects of implementing and operating RTI systems which may be influenced by asset visibility. The study implies that significant cost savings can be achieved through increased asset visibility, and highlights the importance of shrinkage and its impact on the operating cost of an RTI system. However, asset visibility alone is not enough; it requires proper actions and continuous management attention in order to attain the savings.

Research limitations/implications

The results are derived from a single, combined case and simulation study.

Practical implications

The combined methods proved to be an efficient way of assessing and quantifying the potential effect of asset visibility along with the associated uncertainty in the results.

Originality/value

The paper provides an improved understanding of the effect of asset visibility on the management of RTI systems and complements existing visibility literature.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 2 January 2013

Wendy Cavendish and Anabel Espinosa

This chapter examines best practice and burgeoning needs within general and special education teacher preparation programs as identified within the literature and as…

Abstract

This chapter examines best practice and burgeoning needs within general and special education teacher preparation programs as identified within the literature and as evidenced in recent research (Cavendish, Harry, Menda, Espinosa, & Mahotiere, 2012) that examined the beliefs and practices of current educators teaching within schools utilizing a response to intervention (RtI) model. Specifically, our discussion of the emerging needs in teacher preparation programs that prepare both general and special education teachers for assessment, instructional delivery, and progress monitoring within an RtI framework is informed by a 3-year research project of the initial implementation of an RtI model in a diverse, urban school district. Implications for practice include the need to: (a) address deficit perspectives of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students and youth with disabilities, (b) address changing perceptions of the function of special education, and (c) communicate the need for greater collaboration across silos within teacher preparation programs.

Details

Learning Disabilities: Practice Concerns And Students With LD
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-428-2

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Book part
Publication date: 8 March 2021

K. Jhansi Rani

Right to Information (RTI) is a formidable tool in the hands of responsible citizens to fight corruption and ensure transparency and accountability within a participatory…

Abstract

Right to Information (RTI) is a formidable tool in the hands of responsible citizens to fight corruption and ensure transparency and accountability within a participatory democracy. The RTI Act was promulgated in India in October 2005, and has fundamentally changed the power equation between the government and citizens. T.his chapter examines the contribution of the Act, in particular playing a significant role by providing information necessary to combat corruption in India. It is also noted, however, that RTI is not an unmixed-blessing as it is seen how costly it has been for zealous investigative journalists.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2010

Stephanie Al Otaiba, Mary Beth Calhoon and Jeanne Wanzek

The primary purpose of this chapter is to describe intensive multicomponent reading interventions for use in Response to Intervention (RTI) implementation within…

Abstract

The primary purpose of this chapter is to describe intensive multicomponent reading interventions for use in Response to Intervention (RTI) implementation within elementary and middle schools. In early elementary grades, RTI has a focus on prevention through effective classroom instruction and increasingly powerful early interventions to meet student needs. By contrast, in middle school, the focus of RTI shifts to remediation and the provision of interventions with the power to help more students to be able to read on grade level. First, we provide an overview of RTI and explain the notion of treatment validity within RTI implementation. Next, we describe a kindergarten study that illustrates how the intensity of delivery may impact expected outcomes at Tier 2 and then summarize research on extensive interventions for the primary grades. Then we summarize remedial interventions for older students and examine the percent of older students whose reading could be normalized by focusing on a newly developed intensive middle school remedial intervention that incorporates code- and meaning-focused instruction in a peer-mediated format. Finally, we will discuss RTI challenges and implementation issues.

Details

Literacy and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-777-6

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Elizabeth Murakami‐Ramalho and Kathleen A. Wilcox

The purpose of this study is to explore the implementation of response to intervention (RTI) in elementary schools. RTI is a systematic and comprehensive teaching and…

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1391

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the implementation of response to intervention (RTI) in elementary schools. RTI is a systematic and comprehensive teaching and learning process intended to identify and prevent student academic failure through differentiated or intensified instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an exploratory case study approach, this study observes the philosophical shift from removing students from the classroom for testing and remedial instruction, to incorporating a three‐tiered intervention approach beginning with the classroom teacher.

Findings

Findings show the strategies one principal used to implement RTI practices using a whole‐organization structured approach. Teachers and administrators jointly planned the strategies and created venues conducive for the intervention students needed to meet district, local, and national academic expectations.

Research limitations/implications

Research implications relate to the limited sample a single‐case study can provide. Nonetheless, the case brings useful steps at an administrative level in building successful structures for the focused improvement of teaching and learning processes.

Practical implications

Case studies provide a venue for practitioners and researchers to analyze possible approaches based on real examples. This study demonstrates possibilities in the adaptation of mandates to work on behalf of the improvement of children.

Originality/value

This study is significant since there is a growing interest in adopting RTI processes in several countries around the world and in providing possible models of implementation for practitioners and researchers.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Deneca Winfrey Avant

The purpose of this study was to explore the use of response to intervention/multi-tiered systems of supports (RtI/MTSS) in promoting social justice in schools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the use of response to intervention/multi-tiered systems of supports (RtI/MTSS) in promoting social justice in schools.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used survey research, using a 32-item questionnaire, and presented results of approximately 200 school social workers (SSWs).

Findings

Findings suggest that RtI/MTSS encourages a sense of fairness for students by providing a greater understanding of culturally diverse approaches although some room for improvement does exist.

Practical implications

Implications for addressing educational interventions with explicit cultural responsiveness are discussed.

Originality/value

As more diverse students are entering the school system, different backgrounds and learning styles must be taken into consideration. Unfortunately, many schools today continue a legacy of deficit thinking and marginalization (Shields et al., 2005). An expansion of school programs and services are needed to better serve changing student demographics. SSWs lead the way in this paradigm shift by intervening in the educational process at multiple levels. In fact, social workers’ commitment to change is evident from how they promote social and economic equality among people who are marginalized and excluded from social and economic processes.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Rollanda E. O'Connor and Victoria Sanchez

Response to Intervention (RtI) models require valid assessments for decisions regarding whether a student should receive more intensive intervention, whether interventions…

Abstract

Response to Intervention (RtI) models require valid assessments for decisions regarding whether a student should receive more intensive intervention, whether interventions improve performance, whether a student has improved sufficiently to no longer need intervention, or whether a student should be considered for a formal evaluation for special education. We describe assessment tools used currently in RtI models in reading in kindergarten through third grade, along with how these tools function in multiyear implementations of RtI. In addition to the measurement tools, we describe concerns regarding when RtI models are judged for their effects on reading improvement and the attrition that may inflate these results.

Details

Assessment and Intervention
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-829-9

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