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Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Wardah Azimah Sumardi and Rozhan Othman

Human resource management.

Abstract

Subject area

Human resource management.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and graduate level Human Resource Management programmes; Leadership modules.

Case overview

This case accounts the experience of a Malaysian company, Telekom Malaysia Berhad, in implementing talent management practices in its organization. There were several developments that prompted Telekom Malaysia Berhad to initiate a talent management program. The emergence of competitors had forced the company to introduce initiatives to sustain the business. One of the key initiatives involved the need to better manage its talent. The talent management process at Telekom Malaysia Bhd is divided into four key stages. These are first, talent spotting; second, talent assessment and endorsement; third, formulation of individual development plan; and the fourth, readiness level assessment. Each of these stages is implemented using a well-defined set of standards and activities.

Expected learning outcomes

This case examines how commitment and support from line management is crucial in the successful implementation of a talent management program and HR-related initiatives generally. Line managers are identified as the missing linchpin between HRM and organizational performance. The case will also identify how the role of line managers is now shifting to support the HR in a strategic sense. Thus, we find a shift in the HR profession from personnel management to strategic human resource management. The case examines the importance of a positive leader-member relationship, creating a culture which is receptive to change. This can be achieved by transformational leader who fosters closer relationships with subordinates. Finally, the case pinpoints how development can occurs in three main ways – on the job experiences, relationships, networking and feedback and formal training opportunities.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Zumalia Norzailan, Rozhan B. Othman and Hiroyuki Ishizaki

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of strategic leader competencies and the learning methodologies that should be used to develop them.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of strategic leader competencies and the learning methodologies that should be used to develop them.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature on strategizing was done to formulate a model of strategic leadership competencies. This paper also draws from various work on learning to propose how strategic leadership competencies program should be designed.

Findings

The literature highlights the importance of incorporating deliberate practice, experience density, reflective learning and mentoring into strategic leadership development programs.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual work that draws from secondary material. Further empirical examination can help validate the ideas proposed here.

Practical implications

This paper provides a better understanding of how developing strategic leadership competencies are distinct from other leadership programs. It also provides practitioners with an understanding on how to design their strategic leadership development programs.

Originality/value

This paper adds a new dimension to the discourse on strategic leadership development programs by bringing together learning theories from sports education and managerial learning.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Rozhan Bin Othman and Wardah Azimah Sumardi

Human resource management and leadership development.

Abstract

Subject area

Human resource management and leadership development.

Study level/applicability

MBA course on Human Resource Management.

Case overview

This case present the talent management practice at Steelcase. It highlights the approach taken by the company in managing its high performers. The approach taken by Steelcase links leadership development with performance management and succession planning. It also describes the distinct characteristics that make the approach taken by Steelcase different from other companies that implement talent management. This case presents policy options that companies can consider in developing a talent management program.

Expected learning outcomes

Understand and describe the interconnection between various talent development activities. Compare and assess policy options in developing talent management programs. Analyze how Steelcase nurture a high performance culture among its employees. Describe the leadership behaviors Steelcase is seeking to develop among its leaders.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Rozhan Othman, Rohayu Abdul‐Ghani and Rasidah Arshad

This study examines the variations in HRM practice among Malaysian manufacturing firms. A typology of HRM practices is first identified, management expectations towards…

Abstract

This study examines the variations in HRM practice among Malaysian manufacturing firms. A typology of HRM practices is first identified, management expectations towards the HRM function and the performance gap of the HR departments are then examined. The findings obtained are then compared with various theoretical models. A comparison with the empirical finding of a US study is also made. Further, the implications of the findings of this study are examined. Finally, a number of suggestions are proposed to improve HRM practice.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Rozhan Bin Othman and June M.L. Poon

The link between business strategy and human resource management (HRM) practices has received considerable attention from researchers. It is generally believed that…

Abstract

The link between business strategy and human resource management (HRM) practices has received considerable attention from researchers. It is generally believed that integrating strategy and HRM will result in positive organizational outcomes. The empirical evidence for the strategy‐HRM relationship is, however, still inconclusive. For example, it is still unclear as to how these two variables are linked and what other variables are involved. Therefore, this study sought to test a model of the relationships among competitive strategy, HRM practice, quality management approach, and management orientation. Data from a survey of 108 manufacturing companies were analyzed using path analysis. The results indicated that management orientation predicted quality management approach, competitive strategy, and HRM practice. In addition, quality management approach and competitive strategy mediated the relationship between HRM practice and competitive strategy. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Rozhan Othman

This paper aims to propose the idea of linking the use of the balanced scorecard with scenario planning. Scenario planning emphasizes the development of a strategic plan…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose the idea of linking the use of the balanced scorecard with scenario planning. Scenario planning emphasizes the development of a strategic plan that is robust across different scenarios. This ensures that the strategy implemented using the balanced scorecard is linked to external conditions and takes into consideration the expected changes in the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the criticisms of the balanced scorecard and proposes the use of scenario planning as a way of overcoming some of these limitations.

Findings

It argues that the use of scenario planning is capable of overcoming the lack of external orientation in the balanced scorecard. Scenario planning also helps make the balanced scorecard more reflective of changes that may appear in the future. This ensures that the scorecard developed is not merely a linear extension from the present.

Research limitations/implications

Studies need to be undertaken to examine whether integrating scenario planning with the balanced scorecard leads to more effective strategy implementation.

Practical implications

Adopters of the balanced scorecard need to recognize that developing a balanced scorecard system needs to be preceded by a strategy formulation process that incorporates an understanding of how future events may evolve. This can be achieved using scenario planning.

Originality/value

This study is probably the first attempt to link the implementation of the balanced scorecard and scenario planning.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Rozhan Othman

The purpose of this research is to show a preliminary examination of the effects of the development of the causal model of the strategy in the implementation of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to show a preliminary examination of the effects of the development of the causal model of the strategy in the implementation of the Balanced Scorecard. Studies on the Balanced Scorecard adoption show that many organizations that adopted the Balanced Scorecard did not develop a causal model of their strategy. The study seeks to examine the differences in Balanced Scorecard implementation of adopters who developed a causal model of their strategy and those who did not.

Design/methodology/approach

Mailed survey was used to collect the data.

Findings

It was found that Balanced Scorecard adopters who did not develop a causal model of their strategy experienced specific problems more than those who developed a causal model of their strategy. It affected the outcomes and ease of implementation of the Balanced Scorecard.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of responses obtained in this study due to the relatively recent adoption of the Balanced Scorecard in Malaysia limits the generalizability of this study. However, it does provide insights on the hypotheses to be examined in future studies.

Practical implications

The findings of this survey suggest that the successful implementation of the Balanced Scorecard requires that organizations develop and articulate a causal model of their strategy.

Originality

This study is probably the first attempt to examine the role of causal model development in effective implementation of the Balanced Scorecard.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Rozhan Othman, Foo Fang Ee and Ng Lay Shi

The purpose of this paper is to identify a number of limitations of the theory on leader‐member exchange (LMX). This paper aims to argue that under certain conditions high…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify a number of limitations of the theory on leader‐member exchange (LMX). This paper aims to argue that under certain conditions high quality LMX can be dysfunctional. It proceeds to identify the antecedents and outcomes of dysfunctional LMX.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the theory on LMX and justice to identify the conditions that lead to dysfunctional LMX and its consequences.

Findings

A review of the extant literature indicates that favouritism by the leader and the reliance on impression management by followers can lead to dysfunctional LMX. This can then lead to negative reactions from group members and undermine work group cohesiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This paper points to new directions for research in LMX. It highlights the need to recognize that under certain conditions high quality LMX can be perceived as unfairness.

Practical implications

Managers need to recognize issues needing their attention in developing quality exchange with their subordinates. Failure to address these issues can undermine work group performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the debate on the role of LMX. Specifically, it attempts to add to the discussion in the emerging literature on dysfunctional LMX.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Rozhan Othman and Rohayu Abdul Ghani

The purpose of the paper is to examine the impact of supply chain management (SCM) on the HRM practice of suppliers. The paper argues that the performance requirement in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the impact of supply chain management (SCM) on the HRM practice of suppliers. The paper argues that the performance requirement in an SCM system requires that suppliers develop specific HRM practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured interview was used to collect the data from seven companies.

Findings

This paper found evidence to suggest that impact of SCM on the HRM practice of local suppliers is related to the extent of linkage the customers develop with their suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

This paper relied on an examination of seven companies. This limits the generalizability of its findings.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper suggest that a successful supplier‐customer relationship is dependent on the suppliers developing specific HRM practices that will enable them to fulfill customer's requirements.

Originality/value

This paper is probably the first attempt to examine how SCM affects the HRM practice of suppliers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Rozhan Othman and Norman T. Sheehan

The purpose of this paper is to locate different value creation logic contingencies within the resource management framework. While Sirmon et al. discuss how external…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to locate different value creation logic contingencies within the resource management framework. While Sirmon et al. discuss how external environmental contingencies, such as environmental munificence, impact resource management, this paper aims to discuss a second key contingency; that is how the firm's choice of value creation logics impacts its resource management choices. This paper seeks to argue that management of the firm's resources and capabilities is contingent on the value creation logic employed by the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews three value creation logics: value shop, value network, and value chain and then integrates them within the resource management framework.

Findings

A review of extant literature indicates that value shop firms, value network firms, and value chain firms enact very different environments and thus require very different resources and capabilities to support their value creation approaches. It is argued that Sirmon et al.'s resource management framework should reflect these differences.

Research limitations/implications

This paper points to new directions for research in value creation logic theory and provides a basis for future empirical work.

Practical implications

This paper argues that a mismatch between a firm's value creation logic and its resource management practices will have an adverse impact on the firm's performance.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to integrate Stabell and Fjeldstad's value creation logic theory with Sirmon et al.'s resource management framework.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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