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Article

Roya Malekzadeh, Samereh Yaghoubian, Edris Hasanpoor and Matina Ghasemi

Responsiveness is a reaction to the reasonable expectations of patients regarding ethical and non-clinical aspects of the health-care system. Responsiveness is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Responsiveness is a reaction to the reasonable expectations of patients regarding ethical and non-clinical aspects of the health-care system. Responsiveness is a characteristic of health-care system and the observance of the patient’s rights. The purpose of this study is to compare the responsiveness of the health-care system based on the hospital ownership in Mazandaran province in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-sectional study design was used on 1,083 patients referred to public and private hospitals and hospitals affiliated to social security organization in Mazandaran province in 2017. The World Health Organization’s responsibility questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were analyzed by using SPSS version 21. Descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA results are presented is the results section.

Findings

All responsiveness dimensions were salient for respondents. The response rate in the selected hospitals was very close, which ranged from 85.7 to 90.2%, and there was no significant difference between public, private and social security hospitals (p > 0.05). The most crucial responsiveness dimension in hospitals was autonomy.

Originality/value

In the current study, the dimensions of communication and confidentiality were identified as priority dimensions based on the least score for breeding actions to improve the responsiveness of the health-care system. At the end, some useful recommendations such as re-engineering the processes, training to engage the employees with patients and encouraging them to fill the gap were suggested.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Article

Roya Malekzadeh, Ghasem Abedi, Ehsan Abedini, Elaheh Haghgoshayie, Edris Hasanpoor and Matina Ghasemi

Respect for human rights is one of the most important criteria for the delivery of medical care in hospitals. Ethical predictability is useful to identify human rights…

Abstract

Purpose

Respect for human rights is one of the most important criteria for the delivery of medical care in hospitals. Ethical predictability is useful to identify human rights concerns in health-care organizations. The hospital environment and the flow of its processes make the topic of predictability much more sensitive and, at the same time, more difficult than other organizations. The purpose of this paper is to determine and compare the ethical predictive factors in selected hospitals in Mazandaran province.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional survey using multilevel sampling (four hospitals, 938 patients, 186 staff) was conducted in the first half of 2017. The measurement instrument was a researcher-made questionnaire consisting of seven areas of service recipients’ rights, patient safety, patient satisfaction, human resources, governance, organizational and financial commitments. The analysis of the collected data was performed through SPSS V. 22 and one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey’s tests.

Findings

Ethical predictability was higher in social security hospitals compared to private and public hospitals, and patient safety and patient rights showed higher magnitudes compared to other dimensions. Financial domain, patient satisfaction, governance and organizational commitment formed the middle priorities in ethical predictability, and human resources had the least average in ethical predictability in the selected hospitals in the province.

Originality/value

Identifying the factors which influence ethical predictability, in addition to promoting service recipients’ rights and patient satisfaction, is of great help to the managers and health service authorities, so that they can have a better understanding of these factors and, consequently, make appropriate micro and macro-decisions to provide better services.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Article

Ghasem Abedi, Ghahraman Mahmoodi, Roya Malekzadeh, Zeinab Khodaei, Yibeltal Siraneh Belete and Edris Hasanpoor

The regulation defines patients’ rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patients’ rights accepted in…

Abstract

Purpose

The regulation defines patients’ rights as a reflection of fundamental human rights in the field of medicine and incorporates all elements of patients’ rights accepted in international texts. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patients’ safety, medical errors and patients’ safety rights with patients’ security feeling in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in selected hospitals of Mazandaran Province in public, social and private hospitals in 2016. In total, 1,083 patients were randomly selected for the study. The developed tool (questionnaire) was used for data collection. Questionnaire validity was verified through experts and its reliability was confirmed by Cronbach’s α coefficient (95 percent). Data were analyzed through multiple regressions by SPSS software (version 21).

Findings

The findings of this paper showed that the mean (standard deviation) medical error, patient’s safety, patient’s rights and patient’s security feeling were 2.50±0.61, 2.22±0.67, 2.11±0.68 and 2.73±0.63, respectively. Correlation testing results showed that medical error, patient’s safety and patient’s rights simultaneously had a significant relation with patient’s security feeling in the selected hospitals (p<0.05).

Originality/value

A simultaneous correlation between patient’s safety, patient’s rights and medical errors with patient’s security feeling in social security hospitals was higher than other hospitals. Hence, the authorities and officials of hospitals and healthcare centers were advised to make effective attempts to perceive the patient’s safety, medical errors and patient’s rights to improve the patient’s security feeling and calmness and also to make better decisions to promote the healthcare and therapeutic services.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Article

Roya Rahimi

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of four organisational cultural traits of adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission on the three components of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of four organisational cultural traits of adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission on the three components of customer relationship management (CRM), namely, people, process and technology, in the context of the hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Required data are collected with a quantitative approach and a questionnaire adapted from the Denison organisational culture survey and the Mendoza CRM model. The questionnaire was distributed among 364 managers of a chain hotel in the UK and gathered data were examined using the structural equation modelling method.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that the four traits of organisational culture (adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission) have positive and significant impacts on the three components of CRM (people, process and technology). A set of theoretical contributions and practical implications was also discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted with a case study approach; hence, the findings cannot be generalised to a larger population, and the results might be different for other industries. Because of the limitation of access to all employees, only managers were selected as the sample, and future studies with all employees may show different results.

Practical implications

Current study helps hotel managers to understand the role and importance of organisational cultural traits in successful implementation of their CRM strategy components.

Originality/value

The position taken in this study recognises the need to enhance the understanding of organisational culture’s impact on implementing CRM components. Organisational cultural traits have different levels of impact on CRM implementation, and this is the first study to investigate the detailed impacts of the four traits of adaptability, consistency, involvement and mission on the three components of CRM, namely, people, process and technology.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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