Search results

1 – 10 of 209
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Nigel Brunsdon and Roy Massey

Describes the results of a project carried out at Derby City GeneralHospital to introduce new pay and grading arrangements for nurses andmidwives, consistent with their…

Abstract

Describes the results of a project carried out at Derby City General Hospital to introduce new pay and grading arrangements for nurses and midwives, consistent with their locally developed reward strategy. Identifies the factors critical to the success of the project, and also considers the project in the context of research carried out by the Hay Group in to the characteristics of high performing health‐care organizations.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Kathie Vestal and Roy Massey

Examines the growing use of “work transformation” or processre‐engineering techniques in health‐care organizations. Identifies howpressures on funding and increased…

Abstract

Examines the growing use of “work transformation” or process re‐engineering techniques in health‐care organizations. Identifies how pressures on funding and increased expectations are forcing health‐care organizations to adopt radical solutions in their search for lower costs and improved quality of care. Also examines the experience of a number of organizations, and highlights some of the risks involved in taking these approaches.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Roy Massey

Examines why strategic human resources management is a critical issuefor NHS trusts. Defines “strategic” human resource management in a simplemodel, and identifies the…

Abstract

Examines why strategic human resources management is a critical issue for NHS trusts. Defines “strategic” human resource management in a simple model, and identifies the business risks of not taking this approach. Identifies why Trusts find it difficult to take this approach, and provides some practical advice for both chief executives and HR directors.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2011

Roger Openshaw

During the late 1980s New Zealand, in common with a number of other nations, underwent a controversial restructuring of its public sector, including education. The radical…

Abstract

Purpose

During the late 1980s New Zealand, in common with a number of other nations, underwent a controversial restructuring of its public sector, including education. The radical nature of education reform was to be epitomised in the documents Administering for Excellence (the Picot report), and the Labour Government's official response, Tomorrow's Schools. The publication of these documents, however, tended to polarize New Zealand's education sector and the public at large into opposite and opposing camps. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In producing a step‐by‐step analysis of the techniques of persuasion employed during a crucial period of New Zealand's educational history, it will be shown how many of the arguments presented during this time have continued to shape the way we view the educational reforms and their impact more than 20 years later.

Findings

It will be demonstrated that the nature and style of propaganda on both sides was highly sophisticated, expressly aimed at building a constituency that was either supportive or hostile to reform.

Originality/value

This paper is perhaps the first to critically examine the nature and role of propaganda in both promoting the educational reforms and in galvanizing resistance to them. In utilising the very considerable amount of hitherto un‐cited documentary material now available, this paper makes a major contribution to education policy research.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Harjit Sekhon, Sanjit Roy, Gurvinder Shergill and Adrian Pritchard

This empirical paper aims to assess the multi-dimensional nature of trust in service relationships. Although trust is deemed to be important for managing service…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical paper aims to assess the multi-dimensional nature of trust in service relationships. Although trust is deemed to be important for managing service relationships there is a dearth of research looking at its multidimensional nature outside of Western markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is undertaken in three countries: UK, Hong Kong and India (September to November 2010). The sample consists of more than 300 sample members from across the three countries with an approximately even split between each.

Findings

The findings show that cognitive trust does not significantly impact affective trust, but the other relationships in the model are supported. Customer ' s disposition to trust impacts both cognitive and overall trust.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides direction for services marketing scholars and practitioners, but there are limitations because not all types of financial institutions are evaluated.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this work are profound given that transnational operations of most retail banks. Understanding trust dimensions aids relationship managers to devise differentiated strategies to build/re-build and maintain long-term trust relationships with customers.

Originality/value

This work extends the understanding of relationships, but by rooting the work in retail banking it provides new insights for academics and practitioners. For service marketing scholars, this study calls into question some of the multi-dimensional nature of trust and for practitioners it can help aid strategy development.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Sandra S. Graça and James M. Barry

This study investigates the antecedents and outcomes of cognitive trust during the expansion phase in buyer–supplier relationships. It takes a global approach and examines…

Abstract

This study investigates the antecedents and outcomes of cognitive trust during the expansion phase in buyer–supplier relationships. It takes a global approach and examines cultural nuances between developed nation and emerging market firms by including participants from the United States, China, and Brazil. The results demonstrate the importance of trust in building social capital and the central role which trust plays in shaping business relationships in all studied cultural contexts. There are similarities and differences across countries. Results support relationship marketing theory by demonstrating the importance of conflict resolution, communication frequency, and social bond in building buyer–supplier relationships in the United States, which in turn increase cooperation between partners. Results also indicate that in China, social bond plays a much greater role in building trust, which in turn increases cooperation only to the extent that it serves as a mechanism to secure committed relationships. In Brazil, results show that conflict resolution is the most important factor in building trust. It also mediates the relationship between communication frequency and trust, as well as drives cooperation positively. Overall, trust is found to influence exchange of confidential communication and increases commitment between partners in all three countries.

Details

New Insights on Trust in Business-to-Business Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-063-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Tony Proctor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the process of innovation management in the eighteenth century in the context of the search for precision time keeping in the watch…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the process of innovation management in the eighteenth century in the context of the search for precision time keeping in the watch making industry. In particular it looks at how knowledge was managed and transferred among interested stakeholders in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the published horological literature on the subject and considers it within modern theories relating to the management of innovation.

Findings

This paper illustrates that personal contact and collaboration is important to the development of innovation. The paper highlights the importance of networking in the process of innovation and collaboration as a means to share and develop ideas. Collaboration with organisations working in adjacent technologies was found to be present and competition promoted by the incentive of financial reward was found to be a motivator factor for moving innovation forward.

Originality/value

This paper will be helpful to academics who study innovation history as well as current innovation management practices.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Minh Hieu Thi Nguyen, Stuart C. Carr, Darrin Hodgetts and Emmanuelle Fauchart

Social enterprises can be found across Vietnam. However, little is known about how these organizations contribute to the country’s broader efforts to meet the United…

Abstract

Purpose

Social enterprises can be found across Vietnam. However, little is known about how these organizations contribute to the country’s broader efforts to meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This paper aims to explore whether and to what extent differences in social impacts by social enterprises may be explained by the psychological characteristics of social entrepreneurs and cross-sector “ecosystem” partnerships in training, networking, consultation and funding.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of N ≈ 352 Vietnamese social entrepreneurs explored relationships between individual entrepreneurial orientation (EO), social identity, self-construal and personality, with elements of ecosystem partnerships (access to training, networking, consultation and funding) and social impacts over the previous three years (growth/jobs created and people helped, termed efficiency and generosity, respectively).

Findings

Ecosystem partnerships factored into frequency and quality of partnerships. Frequency predicted social enterprise efficiency (p < 0.05) and quality predicted generosity (p < 0.01). Frequency of partnerships further moderated (boosted) significant links between EO (risk innovation, p < 0.05) and efficiency; and between social identity (communitarianism, p < 0.01) to efficiency; plus, quality of partnerships moderated a link between EO (risk innovation) and efficiency (p < 0.05).

Practical implications

Ecosystem partnerships may foster social enterprise development through at least two pathways (equifinality), i.e. frequency and quality. The former is linked to efficiency and the latter to generosity, signaling interrelates but distinguishable outcomes. Direct links between EO and communitarian social identity leading to social enterprise development were additionally boosted (p < 0.05) by the frequency and quality of partnerships. Thus, ecosystem partnerships brought about both direct and indirect benefits to social enterprises in Vietnam.

Social implications

Social impacts of efficiency and generosity support both decent work (SDG-8) and poverty eradication (SDG-1), through ecosystem partnerships in development (SDG-17).

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical study to show that social enterprises in Vietnam may enhance social impacts through a combination of effects from social entrepreneurs and ecosystem partnerships. Current models of social enterprises in low-income countries like Vietnam can be expanded to include ecosystem partnerships and social outcomes relating to SDGs 1 and 8, and especially the multiple path benefits that ecosystem partnerships (under SDG-17) bring to social enterprise development.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2019

Brett Lashua

Abstract

Details

Popular Music, Popular Myth and Cultural Heritage in Cleveland: The Moondog, The Buzzard, and the Battle for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-156-8

Abstract

Purpose

Aboriginal people across Australia have diverse practices, beliefs and knowledges based on thousands of generations of managing and protecting their lands (Country). The intimate relationship Aboriginal people have with their Country is explored in this chapter because such knowledge is important for building insight into the relationship between social and ecological systems. Often in research Aboriginal views have been marginalised from discussions focused on their lands to the detriment of ecosystems and human health. This chapter aims to understand if such marginalisation is evident in Western human–nature relationship discourses.

Approach

This chapter provides a critical literature review which examines whether Aboriginal people’s diverse understanding of their ecosystems have been incorporated into human–nature theories using the biophilia hypothesis as a starting point. Other concepts explored include solastalgia, topophilia and place.

Findings

Critiques of these terminologies in the context of Aboriginal people’s connection to Country are limited but such incorporation is viewed in the chapter as a possible mechanism for better understanding human’s connection to nature. The review identified that Aboriginal people’s relationship to Country seems to be underrepresented in the human–nature theory literature.

Value

This chapter emphasises that the integration of Aboriginal perspectives into research, ecological management and policy can provide better insight into the interrelationships between social and ecological systems.

Details

Ecological Health: Society, Ecology and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-323-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of 209