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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Rouxelle De Villiers

The business environment is changing and education at university business schools does not appear to keep pace. This paper aims to identify principles to guide educators…

1084

Abstract

Purpose

The business environment is changing and education at university business schools does not appear to keep pace. This paper aims to identify principles to guide educators in preparing accounting students for automation and artificial intelligence and sets an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The seven principles are derived from an extensive literature review and the analysis of qualitative data from focus groups, thought leader discussions, interviews and workshops.

Findings

The derived seven Cs model includes: critical, conceptual thinking and the spirit of enquiry; complicate, grapple and fail; create, innovate and experience; concise communication; collaboration; consciousness, respectfulness and ethical fibre; and curiosity, lifelong learning and specialized generalists. An inclusive list of future research topics related to the seven Cs model is provided to aid researchers’ agendas.

Research limitations/implications

Although every attempt was made to base this study purely on expert opinions, as reflected in journal articles, conference papers, interviews and focus groups, it is impossible to prevent author biases from slipping into the interpretation and reflection involved in creating the model. Readers will also find some overlap in terms of the accounting business competencies development model’s seven Cs, due to the inter-related nature of the concepts and because the various definitions of concepts have some habits of the mind and social competencies in common.

Practical implications

The seven principles will help business schools and higher education policymakers guide future education developments with a focus on new competencies and reframed skills, as opposed to new knowledge. The model ensures that scholars and graduates have insight into the essential knowledge, attributes and skills that apply to the diverse nature of accounting vocations and can adapt to unanticipated changes.

Social implications

This new model can be used by business schools to ensure that graduates can fully contribute to a society impacted by automation and artificial intelligence by entering the workplace with the requisite skills. It also responds to critics’ fears about the role of business schools in preparing graduates for the future of work.

Originality/value

The paper contributes in two ways. First, rather than focussing on particular issues or the shortcomings of current education, it identifies broad-based principles from a literature review, interviews, focus groups and workshops. Second, it sets an agenda for future research.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Arch G. Woodside

Abstract

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2022

Jungkeun Kim, Jooyoung Park, Seongseop (Sam) Kim, Hector Gonzalez-Jimenez, Jae-Eun Kim, Rouxelle De Villiers, Jacob C. Lee and Marilyn Giroux

This research aims to examine the role of perceived threat (i.e. COVID-19) on people’s preferences for destination logo designs. In addition, it investigates the influence…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the role of perceived threat (i.e. COVID-19) on people’s preferences for destination logo designs. In addition, it investigates the influence of childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and sensation seeking on the aforementioned effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Five experiments are used. Studies 1 A and 1B examine the impact of the threat of COVID-19 on visiting intentions as influenced by different destination logos. Study 2 replicates the previous studies and tests for evidence of mediation by the perceived risk. Studies 3 and 4 investigate the moderating role of childhood SES and sensation seeking.

Findings

The results show that a salient threat of COVID-19 leads people to display higher visiting intentions when presented with simpler (vs complex) destination logo designs. The perceived risk mediates this effect as well. This preference is evident only for people with low (vs high) childhood SES and only for relatively low sensation seekers.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the branding literature by investigating how situational factors can influence affective reactions to brand logos and to the tourism literature by further investigating the impact of logos on visiting intentions.

Practical implications

This study provides actionable insights for tourism marketers and logo designers, allowing them to select or create positively perceived destination logos during a potential global crisis.

Originality/value

This research offers the first evidence that pandemic-related threat perceptions influence people’s visiting intentions when presented with different destination logos, and that these effects are influenced by individual characteristics such as childhood SES or sensation seeking. In doing so, the current study offers a more sophisticated understanding of the potential boundary conditions driving people’s brand logo evaluation.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Charl de Villiers and Rouxelle de Villiers

This poem aims to examine the difficulties of getting qualitative research published.

1283

Abstract

Purpose

This poem aims to examine the difficulties of getting qualitative research published.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is informed by personal experience.

Findings

The poem reveals that it can be extremely hard to make it through the review process, but there are certain hidden opportunities. It focuses on one such opportunity.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, they are the first to examine the difficulties around the publication of qualitative research in this particular way and to come up with this unique solution. In addition, readers may find solace in the knowledge that their hardships are shared by others. The pressure to publish keeps mounting. This rap uses humour to alleviate the stress and makes the point that all of us have to deal with the situation.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2016

Rouxelle de Villiers, Robin Hankin and Arch G. Woodside

This chapter presents a new model for developing and assessing the decision competencies of executive decision-makers. Prior models consider individual and group…

Abstract

This chapter presents a new model for developing and assessing the decision competencies of executive decision-makers. Prior models consider individual and group decision-making but neglect to consider the impact of group-interactive decision-making on real-world problem-solving and sense-making activities. In the present study experimental protocols represent an approximation of a realistic business decision-making process, where decision-makers consult with groups of stakeholders and then make decisions on their own. The model juxtaposes decision competence with the level of decision confidence with which decisions are made. The study furnishes an objective test for this phenomenon, resulting in quantitative empirical evidence of either follow-the-herd (FTH) behavior, or group-forged individual decisions (GFID), or follow-my-own-mind (FMOM) individual decision behavior. The study investigates the impact of group-interactive decision processes on hubristic behavior – decision-makers who make poor/wrong decisions, but remain confident in their choices, judgments, and decisions. The resulting management decision competency model provides an inter-disciplinary matrix, of benefit to human resource development specialists, and provides scholars in organizational behavior and leadership development with guidance for current and future research into group dynamics and decision competencies.

Details

Making Tough Decisions Well and Badly: Framing, Deciding, Implementing, Assessing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-120-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Gina Ryan and Rouxelle De Villiers

A customer ordered NoName trainers from NoName shoe.co.nz. The shoes did not arrive even after three weeks; therefore, the customer sent an email inquiring why the…

Abstract

A customer ordered NoName trainers from NoName shoe.co.nz. The shoes did not arrive even after three weeks; therefore, the customer sent an email inquiring why the shipping status was still “pending.” The ­customer received no reply from the supplier. Five weeks later the customer sent an additional email, demanding a full refund after discovering alarming reviews on the internet, which suggested the site was a scam. The refund was in the ­customer’s account within the next few days. What should the firm have done to create customer loyalty without jeopardizing profits or recovering costs?

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Kiran Dullabh and Rouxelle De Villiers

A direct service representative persuades a family to switch service providers for their mobile phones to reduce costs and simplify the payment process. One family member…

Abstract

A direct service representative persuades a family to switch service providers for their mobile phones to reduce costs and simplify the payment process. One family member later finds out that her phone is not compatible with the StayConnected (name disguised) network, rendering it almost useless until the problem is resolved.

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Tom O’Hara and Rouxelle De Villiers

Jamie hires a carpet cleaner from the supermarket, but the vacuum doesn’t work, so he returns it. However, he and his flatmates are now unable to clean their carpet, which…

Abstract

Jamie hires a carpet cleaner from the supermarket, but the vacuum doesn’t work, so he returns it. However, he and his flatmates are now unable to clean their carpet, which means they fail their final flat inspection and subsequently lose a part of their bond. He receives a refund for the product rental, but is still out of pocket with regard to the flat bond, and is also a bit disillusioned by the poor service he received in-store.

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Korey Rubenstein and Rouxelle De Villiers

Art Rey, a middle-aged general manager (GM) of a FastFood King franchise in a little town far, far away is something of a local legend. His store is renowned in the…

Abstract

Art Rey, a middle-aged general manager (GM) of a FastFood King franchise in a little town far, far away is something of a local legend. His store is renowned in the neighbourhood for its cleanliness, attention to detail and for providing friendly service – often by Art himself, who works tirelessly to ensure a ‘first class’ customer experience. Art has been awarded dozens of recognitions by FastFood King Corporation over three decades of employment, having started with the company as a fry cook when he was quite young. Art progressed through the ranks at the store level, holding many positions before reaching his present post of GM. He is now looking forward to imparting his years of hard-earned knowledge to younger employees and eventually to retirement. In this case study, Art is evaluating the on-the-job performance of a new manager.

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

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