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1 – 8 of 8
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Mary L. Connerley, Kevin D. Carlson and Ross L. Mecham

Despite general assumptions that recruitment is important to organizational success, little empiric evidence exists to confirm that different recruitment approaches lead to…

3662

Abstract

Despite general assumptions that recruitment is important to organizational success, little empiric evidence exists to confirm that different recruitment approaches lead to meaningful differences in attraction outcomes. This study begins to address this research need by examining the attraction outcomes of firms competing head‐to‐head for recruits for similar positions. Results of an analysis of 391 applicant pools representing 18 different job families suggest that applicant pool quality can vary substantially within and across job families. Utility estimates, based on the hiring of a single employee and using Grade Point Average (GPA) as a measure of applicant quality, produced differences within applicant pools for hiring a single individual valued as high as $15,000. The average difference between the highest and lowest quality applicant pools across 18 job families was $6,394.45 (SD = $3,533.20).

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Mary L. Connerley, Ross L. Mecham and Judy P. Strauss

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role that gender differences play in evaluating perceptions of global competence, individual readiness for expatriate assignments…

6103

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role that gender differences play in evaluating perceptions of global competence, individual readiness for expatriate assignments and overall job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 11 global leadership competencies and perceptions of expatriate readiness for international assignments, along with job performance are rated by self raters and supervisors.

Findings

The results suggest mixed support for sex‐role stereotyping and role‐congruity theory (e.g., women will be rated lower than men for expatriate positions which have typically been held by men) and the similar‐to‐me hypothesis (supervisors will rate same‐sex subordinates higher than opposite‐sex subordinates).

Research limitations/implications

The most interesting finding is that supervisors overall (and male supervisors in particular) rated women lower than men on perceptions of expatriate readiness for international assignments, while there were no differences in ratings of overall performance.

Originality/value

This study uses a sample of male and female self raters and supervisors to examine the relationship between perceptions of expatriate readiness, global competencies, and overall performance. Results suggest that although women may be perceived by their supervisors as having the same level of performance as men, they are not seen as being ready for international assignments at the same rate.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Junaidah Hashim

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not performance of employees is determined by merit of their academic excellence, which is measured by cumulative grade point…

1361

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not performance of employees is determined by merit of their academic excellence, which is measured by cumulative grade point average (CGPA). This paper thus attempts to measure the variables that could possibly influence employees’ performance, such as job satisfaction, motivation and involvement in co‐curriculum activities.

Design/methodology/approach

An adapted version of the questionnaire used by Sarmiento et al. was utilised to assess the perceived performance of employees. Ability construct was measured in terms of employee academic qualification and skills. A 13‐item scale based on Porter was used to measure motivation. A 14‐item scale based on Hackman and Oldham's Job Diagnostic Survey was used to measure job satisfaction. In total, 340 respondents from 87 companies participated in this study.

Findings

The findings revealed that there is a weak relationship between employees’ performance with CGPA. The findings also revealed that there is a weak relationship between employees’ performance and their job satisfaction, motivation and ability.

Research limitations/implications

It would be meaningful for future research if actual performance appraisal report could be obtained.

Practical implications

Company policy makers need to provide a wider employment opportunity to everyone and not merely to candidates based on merit of their academic excellence. Many graduates may be missing out on employment opportunities while they may be the right candidates.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates that academic excellence, which is the main selection criterion used by most employers, is not a determinant of employees’ performance.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Abstract

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1488-1

Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Jennifer K. Sweeney

This study investigated the skill development of academic reference librarians. It has been assumed that skill develops over time through experience, yet workplace competencies…

Abstract

This study investigated the skill development of academic reference librarians. It has been assumed that skill develops over time through experience, yet workplace competencies are currently described without reference to level of expertise. Drawing on the literature of occupational sociology, the Dreyfus model is an experiential, developmental model rather than a trait or talent model, allowing the holistic exploration of skill change through analysis of reference situations as contextualized and social phenomena. Three aspects of change in skill level were investigated: the shift from reliance on rules and abstract principles to the use of real experience to guide action; the growth in ability to discern relevant information from noise in complex situations; and the increase in engaged, involved performance out of initial detachment. Analysis of interview narratives with 17 reference librarians and two reference assistants suggests that the Dreyfus model is applicable to reference skill development with some differences. Skill characteristics were discerned at four levels: beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. Observed skill criteria in the narratives were used to reorganize the mixed skill levels presented in the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) Professional Competencies for Reference and User Services Librarians.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1488-1

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Maria Bastida, Luisa Helena Helena Ferreira Pinto and Anne-Wil Harzing

The expatriation literature has developed an insightful body of research on the reasons why women are not assigned abroad as frequently as men. However, the authors know very…

Abstract

Purpose

The expatriation literature has developed an insightful body of research on the reasons why women are not assigned abroad as frequently as men. However, the authors know very little about the systemic and recursive consequences of women's underrepresentation in international assignments (IAs), which are examined in this conceptual paper.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon expatriation research and a system dynamics perspective, the authors propose a conceptual model to explain both women's underrepresentation in IAs and its recursive consequences.

Findings

The authors highlight how women's underrepresentation in IAs results from a complex system of recursive effects that jeopardizes women's professional development and undermines both their own career progression to top management and firms' competitive advantage and international growth. The authors argue that organizations make decisions that contravene their own interest in a competitive global context. First is that they are limiting their talent pool by not considering female candidates. Second is that they are missing the opportunity to use IAs to advance women's careers.

Research limitations/implications

The model provides a solid grounding for future research on selecting the most effective organizational actions and designing supportive measures to disrupt the persistent dynamics contributing to women's underrepresentation in IAs. Future research could also expand our study by incorporating individual differences and the proactive role that women may take.

Practical implications

The model points to specific managerial interventions (e.g. increased access to job training and specific training ahead of the assignment, dual-career support, women's mentoring and affirmative action) which have the potential to reduce women's underrepresentation in IAs and in top management.

Originality/value

The system dynamics approach enables a broader understanding of why women are underrepresented in IAs, how this underrepresentation further exacerbates gender segregation in international business, and how these recursive outcomes can be averted to the advantage of firms' sustainable growth.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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