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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jane Macnaughton, Mike White and Rosie Stacy

This review article seeks to draw on experience in the UK to describe the different forms that arts in health activity can take and to examine the challenges for research…

4599

Abstract

Purpose

This review article seeks to draw on experience in the UK to describe the different forms that arts in health activity can take and to examine the challenges for research in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is used to describe the kind of arts in health project that intends to enhance the social capital of its community and to show how difficult it is to measure the effects of this work using conventional measures of health improvement. However, those who are responsible for providing funding for arts in health are increasingly demanding results that indicate a measurable health gain from the projects.

Findings

A literature review of the evaluation of arts in health projects in the UK has shown that few aim at direct health improvement but rather at intermediate indicators of health gain, such as raising awareness of health issues and social activity and participation. This suggests that artists instinctively locate their work as having value within a social model of health where improvements in social inclusion and social cohesion are the important indicators which may go on to lead to long‐term improvements to the health of the community in which they are working.

Originality/value

Understanding the nature of this work has implications for the kind of research appropriate to measure its effect and the timescale required for such research.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Rosie Stacy, Katie Brittain and Sandra Kerr

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways…

4229

Abstract

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways in which music and singing relate to health and healing, historically and cross‐culturally, and shows that music forms a part of the healing systems of many cultures. The paper reviews research on the links between music and health. They include studies that suggest that music has profound effects on the emotions, for example, inducing states of relaxation which are particularly useful as an antidote to depression, anxiety and fatigue. Music has also been shown to enhance physical health through improvements to breathing capacity, muscle tension and posture and the reduction of respiratory symptoms. It may also contribute to social health through the management of self‐identity and interpersonal relationships. The paper explores theories that are beginning to develop about the mechanisms that mediate music for health, including the possible connections between immuno‐suppression, stress reduction, and music. The paper goes on to discuss the role of singing with early years children and community groups of adults. A resurgence of traditional music‐making and voice work in community settings is taking place across the UK, and the paper reviews several community‐based initiatives.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Len Tiu Wright

394

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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