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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Patrick Fox

How a manager′s functional area and hierarchicallevel affect the roles required by managers in theirjobs is examined. The 131 managers in the samplecompleted a matrix of…

Abstract

How a manager′s functional area and hierarchical level affect the roles required by managers in their jobs is examined. The 131 managers in the sample completed a matrix of 20 tasks and 28 qualities required in their jobs. A disjoint clustering technique was used to analyse the data – this is a type of oblique component analysis related to group factor analysis. Subgroups of managers were delineated, seven on the basis of their functional areas, and one group of senior managers/executives. The results indicate that the differences between theories of management work can be attributed to methodological artefacts. However, the argument that management is a set of behavioural skills which is transferable from one functional area to another is questioned, as the results of this study indicate that job‐related contingency variables affect strongly the contents of managerial work.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb055281. When citing the…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb055281. When citing the article, please cite: Rosemary Stewart, (1975), “Classifying Different Types of Managerial Jobs”, Personnel Review, Vol. 4 Iss: 2, pp. 25 - 30.

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Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09513559710156733. When citing…

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255

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09513559710156733. When citing the article, please cite: Sue Dopson, Rosemary Stewart, (1997), “The changing role of the regional tier of the NHS”, International Journal of Public Sector Management, Vol. 10 Iss: 1/2, pp. 93 - 107.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 12 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2017

Filipe Morais, Andrew Kakabadse and Nada Kakabadse

The purpose of this paper is to use Stewart’s model of role as a lense from which to explore chairperson and CEO role dynamics in addressing strategic paradox and tension.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use Stewart’s model of role as a lense from which to explore chairperson and CEO role dynamics in addressing strategic paradox and tension.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on 29 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with chairpersons and CEOs of UK-listed companies. Interview data are subjected to role analysis using Stewart’s (1982) Demands-Constraints-Choice (DCC) model of role.

Findings

Findings indicate that relationship levels of trust, communication and chairperson time enable strategic tensions to be raised and confronted in the relationship reducing defensiveness. Two distinct approaches to handle strategic tensions are found. The CEO-led approach predominates and rests on less flexible role boundaries, requiring the chairperson to proactively identify strategic tensions and perform an advisory/mentoring role. The shared leadership approach, less prevalent, rests on highly flexible role boundaries where the skills and experience of each incumbent become more relevant, enabling the separation of efforts and integration of strategic tensions in the relationship in a “dynamic complementarity of function”.

Research limitations/implications

The paper only applies to the UK context and is limited to contexts where CEO and chairperson roles are separate. The paper draws on individual perceptions of chairperson and CEOs (i.e. not pairs).

Practical implications

The paper provides insights to practicing CEOs and chairperson on two distinct ways of working through strategic paradox and tensions.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the scarce literature at chairperson and CEO roles and strategic paradox and tension.

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Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Titus Oshagbemi

This is a study of academic staff occupying formal administrative positions within the university framework of Nigeria. The intention of the study was to see whether there…

Abstract

This is a study of academic staff occupying formal administrative positions within the university framework of Nigeria. The intention of the study was to see whether there were significant managerial job differences between academic leaders and conventional industrial leaders. The important difference between the two roles related to time spent in the office (25.7 per cent for academics and 51 per cent for those managers in industry).

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Management Research News, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1968

ROSEMARY STEWART

MANAGERS are busy people. How busy? If Parkinson is right in his statement that work expands to fill the time available, we cannot necessarily be sure that we are really…

Abstract

MANAGERS are busy people. How busy? If Parkinson is right in his statement that work expands to fill the time available, we cannot necessarily be sure that we are really busy because we feel busy. We can only find out by analysing how we spend our time so as to discover how much we are really accomplishing in a day. We do know that some people seem to be able to do many more things in a day or a week than other people. There is a popular saying that if you want to get something done ask somebody who already has a lot to do. We say this because we know that such a man has learnt to use his time effectively, and that if we go to him he is likely to give us his attention. We can learn both from his example and by studying how we are using our own time.

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Management Decision, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

Rosemary Stewart and Judi Marshall

The beliefs that managers hold about managing are likely to influence their reception of management training. Managers' beliefs about what it is important for them to do…

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Abstract

The beliefs that managers hold about managing are likely to influence their reception of management training. Managers' beliefs about what it is important for them to do, about how they should manage, how well they do manage, and about the desirability or possibility of changing how they manage, are likely to affect whether they want to learn and what they may be interested in learning. This article will argue that management teachers need to try and understand how managers think about managing. It will describe the beliefs reported by some middle managers that have implications for management teaching. Beliefs are defined as the acceptance of something as true or real that is not a demonstrable fact.

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Personnel Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Rosemary Stewart and Nanette Fondas

In today′s rapidly changing and high‐pressured environment,managers need to learn to think more strategically about what theyshould be doing in their jobs. Shows how…

Abstract

In today′s rapidly changing and high‐pressured environment, managers need to learn to think more strategically about what they should be doing in their jobs. Shows how managers can take a strategic view of their work by first recognizing the flexibility and freedom in the job and then the choices they are making, and describes a tool which has been used to help many managers review their choices. Suggests how managers can view more strategically the different lines of action open to them by reviewing three aspects of their behaviour: (1) how they divide their time between people in their networks; (2) where they focus their attention most often; and (3) where they try to have an impact. Concludes that it is especially useful for managers to engage in strategic thinking when they are new to their jobs, later when they have accomplished their initial objectives, and after a change occurs in the job or its context.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1963

Victor Smith

Very, very slowly managers are beginning to realise the infinite complexity of their jobs and with this realisation has come a loss of self‐confidence. So writes Stephen…

Abstract

Very, very slowly managers are beginning to realise the infinite complexity of their jobs and with this realisation has come a loss of self‐confidence. So writes Stephen Aris, reviewing a new book, The Reality of Management, by Rosemary Stewart (Heinemann, 25s.) in The Manager for September. The traditional view of managers, says Mr. Aris, was that they were masters of their own destiny and that work‐people, being naturally lazy, had to be bribed or prodded to give of their best. Today, says Mr. Aris, one third of the working population are employed in large scale organisations and it is becoming quite obvious that old style empirical intuitive leadership just will not do; companies are too large and too complex for any one man to understand and control properly.

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Work Study, vol. 12 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1989

Rosemary Stewart

Considers what the phrase “self development” reallymeans for management. Examines the rationale behind general trendstowards self development approaches. Discusses the…

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Abstract

Considers what the phrase “self development” really means for management. Examines the rationale behind general trends towards self development approaches. Discusses the implications for the organization as well as the individual. Finally considers the learning community as a whole and managers′ responsibility for facilitating their subordinates′ development.

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Executive Development, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

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