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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2013

Anne-Laure Donskoy and Rosemarie Stevens

The purpose of this paper is to present some results of a qualitative study exploring people's memories of the pathways to the first episode of self-wounding. Specifically it will…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present some results of a qualitative study exploring people's memories of the pathways to the first episode of self-wounding. Specifically it will focus on the issue of “suicidality”.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 11 participants, aged between 19 and 50, were described. They were asked to describe their first episode of self-wounding. The interviews were conducted using a semi-structured topic guide. An initial thematic and a subsequent narrative analysis were used to explore the participants’ stories.

Findings

The narratives of self-wounding show that the first episode occurs in a complex landscape of interactions between events and emotions. Even when participants were aware of suicidal feelings before self-wounding, the suicidal intention was abandoned as the self-wounding was shown to be an effective method for dealing with distress. For most of the participants the self-wounding was not associated with suicidality but with a strong need to gain or regain control of an emotionally charged and chaotic environment.

Practical implications

Focusing on the first episode of self-harm holds the key to a better appreciation of the underlying meanings of self-wounding as a complex and dynamic experience. It can provide health care practitioners with a new direction to understanding people's individual motivations rather than focusing relying on behaviour generalised assumptions.

Originality/value

This study provides a rare insight into the first episode of self-harm as a unique event. It is also a rare example of publicly funded service-user research with a focus on issues which are meaningful to them.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Rosemarie C. Kopacsi

“Services to the Unemployed” bring to mind responses which recognise the special needs of workers faced with sudden unemployment. Community‐based supports that can provide for…

Abstract

“Services to the Unemployed” bring to mind responses which recognise the special needs of workers faced with sudden unemployment. Community‐based supports that can provide for major needs of unemployed workers might include re‐employment opportunities, job training, vocational counselling, income maintenance, food and meal programmes, legal aid, housing services, and physical and mental health services.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 11 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Bernie Garrett

Abstract

Details

Empirical Nursing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-814-9

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2017

Maria Busse and Rosemarie Siebert

The need for consumer involvement in innovation processes has been recognised for four decades. Consumer involvement as a part of open innovation is an important strategy in the…

2604

Abstract

Purpose

The need for consumer involvement in innovation processes has been recognised for four decades. Consumer involvement as a part of open innovation is an important strategy in the food sector, specifically for enhancing consumer acceptance and promoting successful market introduction. The purpose of this paper is to systematically analyse the concept of consumers’ role and the level of consumer integration and interaction in recent food innovation processes.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2016, a three-step literature search was performed to identify the state-of-the-art scientific literature on consumer-involvement approaches and methods in the food sector. These methods and approaches were qualitatively analysed based on categories in accordance with the qualitative content analysis method.

Findings

A key finding is that most implemented consumer-involvement approaches and methods fall under von Hippel’s manufacturer-active paradigm rather than the customer-active paradigm (CAP). However, there are practical reasons for the low diffusion of CAP. The presumed reasons include needed change of the perception of roles and of organisational structures, as well as a lack of trust among actors.

Practical implications

There remains a need to promote an active role for consumers, especially amid changing consumer demand and increasingly conscious consumer behaviour concerning food production and processing conditions.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the theoretical and practical discussion about innovation management by reflecting on the innovation paradigm underlying an approach or method. The paper may also have practical implications for the choice and implementation of business models that consider consumers’ role.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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