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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2009

Rosalind Jones and Jennifer Rowley

This research paper seeks to contribute to discussions at the marketing and entrepreneurship interface from the small to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) perspective, in…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper seeks to contribute to discussions at the marketing and entrepreneurship interface from the small to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) perspective, in particular to further developments in the entrepreneurial marketing (EM) literature by presenting a research framework suitable for research exploration of EM in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

Development of the “EMICO” framework has taken place within the context of a research project which explores EM orientation in small technology firms. The framework was constructed using EM theory and informed by a range of established orientation scales drawn from the wider literature. Methodological approaches used in refinement of the framework are then described.

Findings

The paper reflects on and discusses the contribution that extant EM theory makes to the framework's development, specifically reporting the findings relating to EM theory applied to the SME research context.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the paucity of research on the EM orientation of firms by offering a qualitative research framework suitable for the research exploration of EM in SMEs. It advances knowledge and understanding of EM by reflecting on the outcomes of the application of the framework in respect of existing EM theory.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Rosalind Jones and Jennifer Rowley

This article aims to address the paucity of research in relation to eating establishments and food marketing by focussing on the public house sector in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to address the paucity of research in relation to eating establishments and food marketing by focussing on the public house sector in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses secondary data and a qualitative case study approach to investigate pub food marketing in independent public houses based in North Wales, UK.

Findings

The public house sector is a market in decline. Challenges in the market are identified, however, provision of food as part of the market offering provides vital opportunities for additional profit and sustainability. Successful pub food marketing includes: understanding customers; targeting and controlling future markets; e‐marketing; promoting the pub theme/environment; promotion of food “value”; community involvement; and employee training.

Research limitations/implications

Although this is only one small sample of independent public houses, this research provides indications of the marketing issues related to food and dining out, for managers of pubs and other restaurant establishments generally.

Practical implications

The article provides a comprehensive list of marketing issues and solutions that will be useful to publicans and restaurateurs.

Originality/value

This research furthers knowledge and understanding in relation to the marketing of pub food and the marketing of eating establishments in general. Marketing of food is complex; it requires an understanding of the dynamism between the eating establishment, the tourist destination and community base together with an understanding of the combined food product and service offering, and the overall dining experience.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Rosalind Jones and Sara Parry

This paper seeks to provide insights into key areas of business support used by technology entrepreneurs who start businesses in north west Wales.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide insights into key areas of business support used by technology entrepreneurs who start businesses in north west Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a qualitative research approach and a purposive sample of eight small technology firms based on and off technology parks. A card research methodology is piloted in one firm and then incorporated into semi‐structured interviews with entrepreneurs.

Findings

Technology entrepreneurs access direct and indirect support including: grants from local and central government; help from, banks and professionals; universities; technology incubation units, and; collaborations and networks. Evidence also confirms some of the challenges that entrepreneurs face in accessing business support.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides clear indications to public sector organisations, universities and business support agencies as being the most important aspects of business support needed for new technology‐based firms.

Social implications

Successful development of technology firms is recognised as a driver for change, particularly in deprived regions. Solutions to issues faced by technology entrepreneurs in terms of business support and accessibility to grants may increase the likelihood of business success and the boosting of local economies.

Originality/value

Although researchers have explored the value and role of university incubator firms and the role of networks, and also the importance of geographically situated incubation units in relation to stimulation of innovation and entrepreneurial activity, there is a paucity of research in the area of business support for technology entrepreneurs which this paper addresses.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Pattana Boonchoo, Nigel Wadeson and Denise Tsang

The purpose of this paper is to explore empirically whether there are meaningful relationships between key entrepreneurial marketing (EM) variables and the demographic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore empirically whether there are meaningful relationships between key entrepreneurial marketing (EM) variables and the demographic characteristics of the organization and its manager.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered from a sample of 369 hotels from all regions of Thailand through the use of a postal survey. Several multiple regression models were used to test the relationships in the study. Interaction terms were added to some models to test the moderating effects of major demographic variables on various EM attributes.

Findings

The study shows which types of hotels and which types of managers were associated with EM characteristics. The results indicate that demographic characteristics, such as age, size, location, experience, and gender, significantly explain sets of entrepreneurial marketing variables. It was found, for instance, that both a young hotel and a large hotel are positively associated with entrepreneurial marketing, while owner management is positively associated with market orientation and negatively associated with growth aspirations but has no significant relationship with entrepreneurial orientation.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive overview of selected relationships between key EM dimensions in the existing literature. It is suggested that future research involves a more in‐depth exploration of some of the relationships found in this study.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Jane Moriarty, Rosalind Jones, Jennifer Rowley and Beata Kupiec‐Teahan

This paper's aim is to help hospitality management executives and graduate students to understand and to develop marketing expertise in the small hotel sector.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to help hospitality management executives and graduate students to understand and to develop marketing expertise in the small hotel sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies for three hotels illustrate some major marketing challenges for the small hotel sector. Marketing activities are characterized by non‐marketing, inexpert marketing, implicit marketing, and sophisticated marketing categories. These categories are adapted specifically for the small hotel sector.

Findings

Some hotels fall into a distinct category, while other hotels span multiple categories depending on their involvement level in various marketing activities (e.g. marketing intelligence, or promotion).

Originality/value

Training exercises highlight specific marketing issues relevant to small independent hotels. Using the model, benchmarking suggestions are developed based on the hotel's marketing activity level. These exercises help practitioners to recognize this sector's diversity due to a wide spectrum of marketing styles and approaches employed by SME owner‐managers within the hospitality sector.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Mar Solé

Marketing and entrepreneurship have been recognized as having significant interrelations, and to get potentiated when jointly implemented. A whole branch of literature is…

Abstract

Purpose

Marketing and entrepreneurship have been recognized as having significant interrelations, and to get potentiated when jointly implemented. A whole branch of literature is attempting to specify the synergistic effects and to prove it useful for firms' performance. Most entrepreneurial marketing (EM) advantages are found in small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and in turbulent environments, that is why, sometimes EM is applied in its constrained form; being the EM definition, a not‐resolved issue. Nevertheless, EM may be used by all sorts of firms in all kinds of contexts. The purpose of this paper is to extend this discussion and propose an integrated conceptual framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework arises from an exploration of the main definitions of EM to date, pointing out the conceptual backgrounds they stress, and extends on marketable entrepreneurship (ME), entrepreneurial marketing (EM) and entrepreneurial marketing orientation (EMO), conducting a revision on the existent literature.

Findings

In total, three lines of interest are outlined; namely ME, EM and EMO. The first two refer to operative functions, such as those of new product development or marketing mix; while the latter describes a strategic extension that implies the intertwined effects of market and entrepreneurial orientation.

Originality/value

Overall, this paper proposes an integrated conceptual framework for EM research and highlights the synergies between both marketing and entrepreneurship on performance through two distinct paths: improved marketing outcomes with entrepreneurial marketing; and improving entrepreneurship outcomes with marketable entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Nicole Gross, David Carson and Rosalind Jones

– The purpose of this paper is to propose the application of social practice theory for the investigation of entrepreneurial marketing (EM) practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose the application of social practice theory for the investigation of entrepreneurial marketing (EM) practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical gap has been found between scholarly efforts to explain the nature of EM practice and the actual marketing practice or marketing doings of small firms.

Findings

The paper covers some of the EM literature and perspectives and examining the notion of “practice” in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) and entrepreneurship research. Based on an increasing focus on practice in the social theory literature and the contributions of key social theorists, a discussion is framed in terms of how EM practice can be studied through the investigation material and bodily observations and common interpretations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers a proposal that the observations of practitioners’ actions and activities and the investigation of common interpretations can be conceptualized to explain the nature of EM practice. It also gives avenues for future research.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that marketing comprises a wide scope of activities or practices and, in the case of a small firm, is all-pervasive. It also suggests that scholars engage in understanding the collective, distributed, situated, ongoing and tacit nature of EM.

Originality/value

The paper provides a fresh conceptual approach about how EM practice can be studied through the investigation material and bodily observations as well as common interpretations.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Sara Parry, Rosalind Jones, Jenny Rowley and Beata Kupiec‐Teahan

This study seeks to explore the success and failure of two similar small software technology firms from a marketing perspective. Using a dyadic approach, the research aims…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the success and failure of two similar small software technology firms from a marketing perspective. Using a dyadic approach, the research aims to compare the degree of customer orientation and innovativeness exhibited in both firms and to understand contributing factors for success and failure.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐case comparative case study was employed as the primary method of investigation. Participant‐observation in both firms and 22 semi‐structured interviews with owner‐managers, employees and customers provided a holistic approach to how these firms perceived and prioritised marketing and innovation.

Findings

There is a need for small software firms to strike a balance between customer orientation and innovativeness in order to survive. In terms of customer orientation, the findings show that it is not only related to customer contacts and relationships, but is also about delivering on the promise. The small firm's ability to achieve this is highly dependent on managerial style, communication between the firms and their customers, business planning, market research, promotion and firm culture.

Practical implications

The benefits of this study, which demonstrates the stark contrast between successful and unsuccessful behaviour, can act as a useful guide for small to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) managers who often have technical but less managerial competencies.

Originality/value

This is a unique study comparing two software SMEs, particularly one which failed and one which succeeded under similar conditions, thus illustrating good practice by contrasting with bad practice. It also contributes to the literature on how SMEs conduct marketing in the software industry and how to secure small firm sustainability and growth in developing regions.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Özge Gökbulut Özdemir

The study seeks to extend the comprehension in entrepreneurial marketing (EM) and social value creation through searching the entrepreneurship process in the socially…

Abstract

Purpose

The study seeks to extend the comprehension in entrepreneurial marketing (EM) and social value creation through searching the entrepreneurship process in the socially valued art industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a qualitative method: multiple case study. In total, six art‐related innovative enterprises are chosen in different categories (art school, museum, art fair, art gallery, art media) in the art industry. Common properties of the cases are; creating social value in different scopes; and being pioneer and changing the rules in their fields as the entrepreneurial marketers.

Findings

The result of the case study is based on the comprehensive model of entrepreneurship process and the findings are introduced in sub titles: antecedents of the entrepreneurship process; antecedents of non‐profit and for‐profit enterprises; ambidextrous entrepreneurship process; and ambidextrous dimensions of social value creation.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides a new insight on social value creation and EM literature.

Social implications

The art industry is closely related with social value creation and the study is valuable for filling the gaps between art and the entrepreneurship in this context.

Originality/value

The study is valuable since it focuses on opportunity‐related phases of entrepreneurship and introduces a holistic and process‐based model in the context of cognitive and institutional environmental factors. The Ambidextrous Model of Entrepreneurship and Social Value Creation is valuable in order to inspire future researches, especially in EM.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Andrew McAuley

The purpose of this paper is to offer a perspective on the economic performance of small to medium‐sized enterprises' (SMEs') innovation and education in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a perspective on the economic performance of small to medium‐sized enterprises' (SMEs') innovation and education in the context of entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

A wide ranging narrative supported by examples.

Findings

There is still plenty of opportunity for innovation in entrepreneurship education.

Research limitation/implications

There is real and timely opportunity to follow a research agenda in this area which would be of significant benefit to public policy.

Practical implications

Building pathways to entrepreneurial effectiveness is a challenge but could lead to effective public policy.

Social implications

Economic activity cannot be undertaken in isolation from the cultural context. Entrepreneurship is a force for social change.

Originality/value

The discussion offers a personal viewpoint and poses questions.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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