Search results

1 – 10 of 349
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Rosa´rio Maca´rio

The essential characteristic of a system is the interaction of its parts. Consequently the individual improvement in the performance of its parts taken separately…

Downloads
1448

Abstract

The essential characteristic of a system is the interaction of its parts. Consequently the individual improvement in the performance of its parts taken separately, although necessary, does not assure the overall improvement of its performance. A determinant factor of this performance is how well the different parts of the system fit together. In an urban mobility system we can distinguish three levels of planning and control with different organisational requirements and functional roles. The strategic level, where the political objectives of the system are defined as an answer to the stakeholders, the tactical level, where the previous objectives are translated into operational specifications, and the operational level, where transport happens and the contact with the customer effectively takes places. The present work presents the structure of a total quality management model that should serve as a basic framework for the planning and control of the urban mobility system.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2018

Alejandro Rodriguez-Andara, Rosa María Río-Belver, Marisela Rodríguez-Salvador and René Lezama-Nicolás

The purpose of this paper is to deliver a roadmap that displays pathways to develop sustainability skills in the engineering curricula.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deliver a roadmap that displays pathways to develop sustainability skills in the engineering curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

The selected approach to enrich engineering students with sustainability skills was active learning methodologies. First, a survey was carried out on a sample of 189 students to test the current sustainability literacy and determine the roadmap starting point. Next, a scientometric study regarding active learning methodologies was executed. A total of 2,885 articles and conference proceedings from the period 2013-2016 were retrieved from the Web of Science database. The records were then imported into text mining software to undergo a term clumping process. Annual knowledge clusters based on key terms were outputted. Finally, a roadmap was created by experts based on the annual knowledge clusters.

Findings

Four annual pathways were created along the roadmap to develop sustainability skills during the four-year college course in engineering. The first consisted on promoting a recycling campaign through a circular economy. The second aimed at creating educational videos regarding sustainability. The third reinforced reasoning and argumentative skills by preparing a debate on environmental issues. The last path assumed that the student is working in internship programs and prepared him/her to apply environmental management models to solve sustainability issues within the company.

Research limitations/implications

Roadmaps should be updated approximately every two years to reflect novelty. The proposed methodology shows an easy way to create them.

Practical implications

Results from this paper, as well as the proposed methodology, can be applied to any organization forming individuals: from primary school education to employee training programs in organizations.

Social implications

The development of sustainability skills has a direct, positive impact on professional decision-making and, ultimately, on the environment.

Originality/value

This paper presents a roadmapping process to develop sustainability competences throughout engineering college education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Hernan Eduardo Riquelme, Rosa Rios and Noura Al-Thufery

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether posting on Instagram contributes to empowerment and through what mechanisms.

Downloads
3350

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether posting on Instagram contributes to empowerment and through what mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 372 women instagrammers from Kuwait participated in the survey. LISREL 8.2 was used to perform confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling, employing the maximum likelihood estimation method.

Findings

Instagram posts have direct and indirect effects on psychological empowerment. The indirect effect appears through two perceptual mechanisms: sense of self-efficacy and sense of community (SOC). The former provides women with a sense of mastery and control and the latter gives them the perception of belonging to a community that equips individual participants with a collective efficacy. Of the two mechanisms, the SOC plays a more significant role in creating psychological empowerment. Having a sense of virtual community, as opposed to participating in real ones, can act as catalyst in creating empowerment.

Originality/value

This study investigates the impact of a recent new technology, namely, Instagram, in regions where women are marginalized for generations. Instagram is important, because images, photo captions, short texts and hashtags are vital elements of communication in the present day. Furthermore, women are twice as likely to think highly of a brand that makes an empowering ad and are more likely to share, comment and like the ads.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Hernan Eduardo Riquelme, Rosa E. Rios and Akram S. Gadallah

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to test the direct influence of servant leadership (SL) on an organization’s serving-driven capabilities (S-DC). Second, to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to test the direct influence of servant leadership (SL) on an organization’s serving-driven capabilities (S-DC). Second, to test the indirect effect of SL on employee customer-service behaviors and identification with their branch. Third, to determine the direct effect of an organization’s S-DC on employee customer-service behaviors and identification with the branch. Thus, the authors provide evidence of how SL influence serving-driven interaction capabilities that are later deployed to execute customer-oriented behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from a sample of 36 bank branches of one bank in the Middle East. Employees evaluated their manager’s SL behaviors, the six S-DC and their identification with the organization. In turn, managers assessed their employees on customer-service behaviors. Partial least squares path analysis was used to model the relationships.

Findings

Results indicate servant leaders’ behaviors are example, motivator and determinant of an organization’s S-DC. Employees not only adopt the S-DC by imitation but also as a mean to reciprocate the leader: serve your customers like the leader serves you. Other results and implications for managers are presented.

Research limitations/implications

The study is of a cross-sectional nature therefore a causal effect of SL on S-DC cannot be determined. Second, the study is limited to one bank although several branches were randomly sampled. Third, the evaluations of the S-DC have been done by the employees rather than customers.

Practical implications

The S-DC concept provides ample opportunities for managers to enhance their interactions with employees and customers to improve their performance by identifying which capabilities to develop. Specifically, interactions that promote ethical, empowering, developmental relationships and that encourage genuine two-way communication and responds to individual needs.

Originality/value

The study is original in testing the mediating effect of a S-DC. The focus on individual and organizational capabilities is relevant because they have been touted as among the most important factors to explain the differences of company performances and competitive advantages

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 August 2010

Rosa E. Rios and Hernan E. Riquelme

The purposes of this paper are to test sources of brand equity for online companies and to examine the role of selective internet marketing activities on the brand equity sources.

Downloads
5048

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are to test sources of brand equity for online companies and to examine the role of selective internet marketing activities on the brand equity sources.

Design/methodology/approach

These objectives were pursued by testing the nomological validity of the model using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The paper finds evidence for the proposed sources of brand equity for online companies based on brand awareness and recognition, brand association (trust) and loyalty. The investigated antecedents namely functionality, fulfilment and customer service on line, significantly influence the sources of brand equity.

Research limitations/implications

The study is cross‐sectional, the dimensions to measure sources and antecedents of brand equity may not be comprehensive enough. The stimuli represent only a few online retailers.

Practical implications

Businesses are well advised to invest resources in creating brand recognition, customer loyalty and trust. Both of these can be achieved by developing internet marketing efforts around functionality, fulfilment of the promise and customer service support.

Originality/value

The nomological validity of the measurement and structural models for companies that operate on the internet, constitute a modest contribution. It is believed that a model, which integrates both, creates a more systemic view of brand equity. Apart from this one, there is no other study measuring the impact of internet marketing activities on brand equity sources.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Rosa E. Rios, Hernan E. Riquelme and Yasser Abdelaziz

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers perceive the trustworthiness of halal certifications from various Muslim and non-Muslim countries, a topic highly…

Downloads
3045

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers perceive the trustworthiness of halal certifications from various Muslim and non-Muslim countries, a topic highly disregarded despite the size of the market and the importance in penetrating the multibillion market.

Design/methodology/approach

A customized factorial design was employed to measure main effects of brand familiarity, country trustworthiness and country favourability and interaction effects.

Findings

Although Indonesia and Malaysia are Muslim countries, they are not perceived as trustworthy as others such as Saudi Arabia and Kuwait for the consumer product under study. The perception of trustworthiness of halal certification of origin explains the highest proportion of the variance in the preference for a product, followed by the interaction of country favourability and brand name country of origin (COO).

Research limitations/implications

Managers of international companies should be aware that not all halal country certifications are equally perceived as trustworthy therefore, they should seek alliances, with institutions in markets where they seek to penetrate.

Practical implications

The procedure for certification considers the whole value chain rather than just simple ritual of slaughtering. Managers have a big responsibility to produce their products according to the expected standards (and this goes beyond the simple slaughtering ritual) and make sure that all employees understands the importance of such adherence.

Social implications

Muslim consumers’ preferences vary according to the COO of halal products, even within Muslim countries therefore, halal certification country-of-origin is a sensitive social concern.

Originality/value

This research is based on COO and brand familiarity frameworks, and it extends the knowledge in a context (halal products) not frequently explored.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Hernan E. Riquelme, Mohamed Elthani and Rosa E. Rios

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the percentage of generic inventory pharmacists have in stock, to comprehend why pharmacists in Jordan recommend and dispense…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the percentage of generic inventory pharmacists have in stock, to comprehend why pharmacists in Jordan recommend and dispense generic products.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 104 pharmacists were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire contained statements about perception of generic products, inclination to recommend generic products, importance of promotions, factors influencing a recommendation, stock of generics, and among others. Correlational and discriminant analyses were used to establish associations between variables to distinguish characteristics between groups.

Findings

More than half of the Jordanian pharmacists sampled carry between 20 and 39 per cent stock of generic drugs and 46 per cent carry more than 40 per cent stock. One‐third (33 per cent) substitutes branded products by generic ones and slightly more (36 per cent) recommend more generic than branded products as opposed to those who recommend more branded products (24 per cent). Male pharmacists (49 per cent) tend to recommend more generic products than do females (24.6 per cent) and those who recommend more branded products are more influenced by sales visits rather than manufacturer's name or bonuses.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable information about the pharmaceutical industry in Jordan and the empirical study adds insights from pharmacists about generic medicine.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Hernan E. Riquelme, Eman Mahdi Sayed Abbas and Rosa E. Rios

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors that influence attitudes toward counterfeits, and the intention to purchase these illegal products in a Muslim country.

Downloads
3171

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors that influence attitudes toward counterfeits, and the intention to purchase these illegal products in a Muslim country.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 401 participants completed a questionnaire that contained 41 statements related to beliefs about counterfeited products such as risks, ethics and social norms. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were performed to test the measurement and structural models.

Findings

Value consciousness, performance risk (negative relationship), norms (subjective and descriptive) and ethical consciousness influence attitude. Previous purchase moderates attitude and intention. Attitude explains a considerable percentage of the variance of intention to purchase counterfeits. Beliefs explain attitude to a large extent.

Research limitations/implications

There is a lack of product specification; also respondents were more educated than the population (73.3 per cent have a university degree).

Practical implications

People do not see themselves as being unethical in buying counterfeits, even in a religious environment and do not perceive prosecution risks. Government enforcement is important to alter these perceptions. Finding the right price that preserves a premium price for the brand and a perceived “fair” price may be the answer to the problem.

Originality/value

The paper describes a study conducted in an Arab Muslim and rich Middle Eastern country. Previous studies in Asian countries, less economically advantaged and with Muslim populations, have not related their findings to religious beliefs or ethical consciousness.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Rosa E. Rios and Hernan E. Riquelme

The purpose of this paper is to determine if the traditional approach to measuring brand equity applies to online companies.

Downloads
11281

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine if the traditional approach to measuring brand equity applies to online companies.

Design/methodology/approach

This objective is pursued by: developing a measurement model of brand equity for online businesses; and testing the nomological validity of the model using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study finds partial support for the application of the offline brand equity theoretical framework based on brand awareness, brand associations and loyalty for online companies. Brand loyalty and brand value associations directly create brand equity.

Research limitations/implications

The study is cross‐sectional, the indicators or observable variables used in this study may not be deemed comprehensive enough, no interaction effects have been incorporated, and finally, the research study was based on a few online business retailers.

Practical/implications

The results support the view that a consumer's perceived sense of value resulting from a transaction with an online business develops loyalty. Also, brand‐trust association and brand awareness indirectly contribute to creating brand equity through their influence on loyalty. Loyalty is by far the most important source of brand equity because of its direct influence and mediating role in creating brand equity.

Originality/value

While many studies have identified and ratified the importance of brand equity dimensions among traditional firms, few have tested the model with online companies.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Hernan E. Riquelme and Rosa E. Rios

This paper seeks to test the factors that can influence adoption of mobile banking among current users of internet banking in Singapore and gender as a moderating variable.

Downloads
12152

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to test the factors that can influence adoption of mobile banking among current users of internet banking in Singapore and gender as a moderating variable.

Design/ methodology/ approach

A sample of more than 600 current users of electronic banking provided opinions about their intention to use mobile banking, perceptions of relative advantage of the mobile device, perception of risk, social norms, ease of use and usefulness of the device for banking purposes. The data were submitted to LISREL for structural equation modeling.

Findings

Usefulness, social norms and social risk, in this order, are the factors that influence the intention to adopt mobile banking services the most. Ease of use has a stronger influence on female respondents than male, whereas relative advantage has a stronger effect on perception of usefulness on male respondents. Social norms (or the importance of others in the decision), also influence adoption more strongly among female respondents than male.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is biased towards people who are currently using internet for banking. However, mobile banking innovators may not come mainly from current users of internet banking.

Practical implications

Since gender plays a moderating role in the perception of ease of use, social norms and relative advantage, companies are advised to target their communication tactics according to gender. Social norm is more important to females than males as well as ease of use, whereas, relative advantage is more important for males.

Originality/ value

The study purposefully uses gender as a moderator and risk as an independent variable not often considered in previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

1 – 10 of 349