Search results

1 – 2 of 2
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Rosa Duarte Pac and Julio Sánchez‐Chóliz

This paper uses the input‐output methodology in order to study the water pollution associated with an economic system, through an examination of the productive…

Abstract

This paper uses the input‐output methodology in order to study the water pollution associated with an economic system, through an examination of the productive relationships which link the different sectors and their involvement in the water pollution that is generated. The indicators associated with the demand models are obtained on the basis of the construction of primary pollution and return matrices. In a second stage, an analysis is made of the trade‐offs between economic and environmental variables, as a way of linking the variables to be taken into account for the purposes of environmental planning. The empirical application is made for the regions of the Ebro Valley (Spain). The results show the importance of considering the responsibility of the agriculture, livestock and food sectors for the coherent treatment of the water pollution problem.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the chemical and functional composition of acerola, guava and cashew freeze-dried pomaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Fruit pomaces were obtained from the pulp juice industrial sector and submitted to freeze-drying. Samples were analysed for composition (macronutrients, micronutrients, moisture and ash), technological attributes (morphological, hygroscopicity, retention of oil and water and solubility), bioactive compounds (total phenolics, flavonoids, proanthocyanins, anthocyanins, carotenoids and ascorbic acid), antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Total phenolics, brown pigments and antioxidant activity of thermally treated samples were evaluated. Results were presented as mean and standard deviation, and submitted to Shapiro–Wilk normality test, and ANOVA statistical significance follows by Tukey’s post hoc test (p<0.05). Also, Pearson correlation coefficients were used to test the relationship between selected parameters.

Findings

Guava pomace had the highest insoluble fibre (40.6 per cent), protein (13.8 per cent) and lipid (9.3 per cent) contents and acerola higher soluble fibre (14.2 per cent) and water and oil holding capacity (12 and 5.4 g/g, respectively). Cashew pomace had higher solubility (45.3 per cent) and hygroscopicity (11.2 per cent). Acerola pomace had the highest phenolic content (5,331.7 mg AGE/100 g), DPPH and oxygen radical absorbance capacity antioxidant activity (63.3 and 756.6 µmol TE/g). Despite of that none of extracts showed antibacterial activity. All pomaces presented good antioxidant activity retention after thermal treatments (> 70 per cent), which might be correlated to thermally induced brown pigments.

Originality/value

This investigation was motivated by the large amounts of pomaces produced by the fruit pulp and juice processing industries, which represents a waste of residual phytochemicals and cause potential environmental problems. Overall, it was demonstrated that freeze-dried acerola, guava and cashew pomaces are promising ingredients for multiple food applications.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 2 of 2