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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Bersisa Berri and Rory Donnelly

Making effective use of the knowledge available to a charitable organization is crucial to the achievement of its strategic objectives and the outcomes of its humanitarian…

Abstract

Purpose

Making effective use of the knowledge available to a charitable organization is crucial to the achievement of its strategic objectives and the outcomes of its humanitarian interventions. This study aims to explore the integration of knowledge at an international development charity from the perspective of its workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

Rich primary data were collected through an in-depth case study of a large international development charity actively embracing the management of knowledge using semi-structured interviews (n = 42), participant observation and organizational documentation. The data were integrated and analyzed thematically.

Findings

The analysis of the empirical data sheds light on how a more systematic framework for knowledge integration and application could enhance the capabilities and strategic effectiveness of a charitable organization.

Originality/value

The findings enable important contributions to the strategic management and effective use of knowledge in charitable organizations by empirically uncovering how a more coherent and structured approach to knowledge management could enhance the focus, efficiency, flexibility and relevance of its actions and those of its members. Accordingly, this paper advances a new integrated schema to meet the goals of charities and their stakeholders for broader application and testing by charities and future researchers.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Rory Donnelly

The purpose of this paper is to shed light upon the reasons why knowledge workers are offered considerable autonomy, and the extent to which they are given the freedom to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light upon the reasons why knowledge workers are offered considerable autonomy, and the extent to which they are given the freedom to determine how and when they work.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to examine the level of flexibility available to knowledge workers, a large consultancy firm was investigated using a case‐study approach.

Findings

The results obtained from the case‐study firm demonstrate the reasons why consultants are afforded temporal and locational flexibility and the degree of flexibility available to them. Contrary to the claims of “futurists”, many knowledge workers are not able to exercise greater control over their working arrangements than traditional employees, as their temporal/locational flexibility is restricted by the needs of their employer(s), client demands and expectations, “professionalism”, network relations and personal career ambitions.

Originality/value

The role played by knowledge workers in the new knowledge economy and the extent to which they are able to extract concessions from their employers have become key areas of interest for organisations, academics and policy makers. Consultancy characterises many of the changes that are being elicited with the emergence of a knowledge‐based economy, and an analysis of the working arrangements available to consultants provides an insight into the degree to which they are given freedom to determine how and when they work and the extent to which they may be defined as “free workers”.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Rory Donnelly

The paper aims to examine whether the knowledge management practices deployed by a multinational consultancy differ according to the national context in which they are

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine whether the knowledge management practices deployed by a multinational consultancy differ according to the national context in which they are implemented and whether the practices that are deployed are effective in diffusing consultancy knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The method chosen to explore the questions was a case study of one of the “Big Four” consultancy firms, involving an intensive study of one part of the business operating in the UK and The Netherlands.

Findings

The findings revealed strong similarities over the ways in which the case study firm managed its intellectual capital in both the UK and The Netherlands. This convergence in practices supports the notion that consultancies often copy practices that have proved successful in order to avoid uncertainty and the risk of being out of step with their competitors/counterparts. In addition, the results revealed a number of problems with the practices deployed by the firm that arose as a result of the diverse set of interests that exist between consultants, their employers, and their colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

It is important to be aware of the potential affect of different national contexts because greater inter‐country differences could perhaps be observed if, for example, the UK‐side of the firm was to be compared to an Asian counterpart.

Originality/value

This paper makes a significant contribution to the understanding of knowledge management within global firms and sheds empirical light on debates over whether the knowledge management systems deployed by multinationals follow a universal pattern of organisation or are subject to international variation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Rory Hearne

This article aims to explore the concept of achieving the “right to the city” for marginalised communities. It uses human rights instruments and regeneration best practice…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the concept of achieving the “right to the city” for marginalised communities. It uses human rights instruments and regeneration best practice to develop a toolkit of indicators for urban regeneration. The article contributes to the literature on realising economic, social and cultural rights encompassed in the “right to the city”.

Design/methodology/approach

The article adopts an interdisciplinary approach, involving human rights law, urban planning, housing studies, community development, housing law and social policy. It draws on primary qualitative (participative and observatory) research undertaken by the author while implementing a human rights based approach in an Irish inner‐city local authority estate from 2009 to 2013.

Findings

The human rights framework can be adapted to develop a set of measurable regeneration indicators. This article suggests that the application of this rights toolkit provides a greater potential for regeneration to meet human rights standards, and therefore, realise the “right to the city” in practice.

Research limitations/implications

The application of the human rights based approach to urban regeneration would benefit from wider empirical testing on its suitability for implementation in other countries and global regions. It would benefit from critical engagement with human rights practitioners, community groups, and state agencies seeking to realise the “right to the city”.

Originality/value

This is the first known academic attempt to explore the pathway of a human rights based approach to urban regeneration in order to realise the “right to the city” in practice.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2017

Abstract

Details

Gender Panic, Gender Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-203-1

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Rory James Ridley-Duff and Michael Frederick Bull

This paper aims to re-evaluate social enterprise (SE) history to pinpoint a pluralist turn in communitarian philosophy during the 1970s, which has the potential to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to re-evaluate social enterprise (SE) history to pinpoint a pluralist turn in communitarian philosophy during the 1970s, which has the potential to transform labour and consumer rights in enterprise development.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a close examination of model rules created by founders of the FairShares Association (FSA), the authors find that the communitarian origins of SE are disturbingly obscured and hidden.

Findings

In studying FSA documents and building a timeline of the development of the FairShares Model (FSM), the authors found links between SE developments in the UK, continental Europe, Asia, North/South America and the development of solidarity cooperatives.

Research limitations/implications

The authors argue that the discovery of a communitarian pluralist turn advances “new cooperativism” by enfranchising both labour and users in industrial relations (IR). Using this insight, they challenge accounts of SE history and argue for more research on SE’s potential contribution to radical IR.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the potential of the FSM as a vehicle for catalysing new SE and IR practices that share wealth and power more equitably between social entrepreneurs, workforce members, service/product users and community/social investors.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2022

Aimee Riedel, Rory Mulcahy, Amanda Beatson and Byron Keating

This paper aims to report on the first comprehensive, social marketing systematic review of interventions targeting illicit drug use by young adults.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the first comprehensive, social marketing systematic review of interventions targeting illicit drug use by young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 3,169 papers were screened, with 20 relevant empirical studies meeting the eligibility criteria for the systematic review. These were analysed according to Andreasen’s (2002) and NSMC’s (2006) social marketing benchmarks.

Findings

The findings provide evidence regarding the efficacy of behavioural and clinical interventions targeting individuals and groups, including motivational, life skills training, cognitive behavioural therapy, comprehensive health and social risk assessments and buprenorphine treatment interventions. Further, results evidence that there is yet to be an intervention which has implemented the full marketing mix, and limited studies have used the social marketing benchmarks of exchange and competition.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to conduct a comprehensive systematic review and provide key recommendations outlining the potential for social marketing to support the improved uptake and efficacy of interventions. A research agenda is also put forward to direct future social marketing scholarship in the area of young adult drug interventions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Carolyn Wilson-Nash, Amy Goode and Alice Currie

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the special issue theme by exploring customer response to automated relationship management tactics on social media channels.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the special issue theme by exploring customer response to automated relationship management tactics on social media channels.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 17 in-depth interviews of young adults, ranging from the age of 19 to 26, were conducted. From this, customer journey maps were compiled incorporating socialbots as a valuable touch point along the service delivery cycle.

Findings

The research frames the socialbot as a valued customer service agent to young adults with some favouring this over telephone and email communication methods. Younger consumers respond positively to the quick resolution offered by the socialbot mechanism with most acknowledging that the bot is only able to manage simplified requests. Human-to-human customer relationship management is preferential when the query reaches critical mass.

Research limitations/implications

Socialbots on Facebook Messenger provided the research context for this study; therefore, other platforms and owned website bots should be considered in future studies.

Practical implications

This research identifies the younger generation as a key target market for the development of customer service-related bots.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the socialbot as an automated touch point in the customer journey and contributes knowledge to the growing body of literature focussed on artificial intelligence in customer service. Moreover, it provides valuable qualitative insights into how socialbots influence the customer experience and related outcome measures.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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