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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Kwame Obeng Dankwa, Yu-Jiao Liu and Zhi-En Pu

Due to the rise in urbanization, demand for easily prepared foods such as pastries and noodles has risen. But the high price of wheat in the global market puts financial…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the rise in urbanization, demand for easily prepared foods such as pastries and noodles has risen. But the high price of wheat in the global market puts financial stress on low-income people, especially on those living in tropical regions, where wheat does not thrive well. They depend solely on imported wheat, which is expensive due to importation cost, or seek other relatively less-nutritious cereals. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibility of supplementing wheat flour with flour from relatively cheap and easy-to-produce root tuber, such as cassava, potato and sweet potato.

Design/methodology/approach

Strong-, medium- and weak-gluten wheat flours were supplemented with flour from cassava, potato and sweet potato at 10, 20 and 30 percent. Strong gluten composites were used to make bread, whereas medium and weak gluten composites were used for cookie and noodle production, respectively. Protein, ash, fat, crude fiber, moisture, carbohydrate, gluten, zeleny and energy contents of each composite were tested.

Findings

The nutritional and sensory quality of bread, cookies and noodles made from wheat flour supplemented with root tuber flour at 10, 20 and 30 percent was assessed. Results revealed that mixing wheat flour and root tuber flour has important effects on the moisture, protein, carbohydrate, fat, ash, gluten, zeleny sedimentation value and crude fiber content of the resulting mixture. Moisture and carbohydrate increased while protein and fat significantly (p<0.05) decreased with increasing root tuber flour levels in formulations. Gluten content also decreased significantly with rising root tuber flour concentrations. There was a mild reduction in bread’s general acceptability at 10 and 20 percent in potato composites; thus potato flour was still acceptable at 20 percent. Cassava flour composite also topped with a general acceptability score of 69.26 at 20 percent in cookies, whereas sweet potato composite achieved a score of 84.81 in noodles.

Originality/value

This work has successfully confirmed that wheat flour could be supplemented up to 20 percent with root tuber flour without compromising the nutritional and sensory quality of products. It has also demonstrated that different products require different root tuber flour substitution for optimum results. Potato at 10 percent substitution was found to be best for bread production. Cassava and sweet potato at 10 percent substitution were also best for cookies and noodles, respectively. With respect to protein content only, sweet potato substitution is better than cassava and potato.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Manu and N. Khetarpaul

The aim of the present nutritional survey was to assess the food consumption pattern of 183 Indian preschool children (four to five years) in Fatehabad district of Haryana.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the present nutritional survey was to assess the food consumption pattern of 183 Indian preschool children (four to five years) in Fatehabad district of Haryana.

Design/methodology/approach

Data regarding food frequency, myths and intake were collected with the help of questionnaires and structured interviews. Food consumption patterns were recorded using a 24‐hour recall for three consecutive days.

Findings

The food frequency pattern indicated that wheat was the most accepted cereal among almost all the families and the consumption of pulses was weekly or on alternate days. They consumed roots and tubers frequently but the consumption of green leafy vegetables, fruits and other vegetables depended on the availability only. Most of the families consumed buffalo's milk (93 per cent) and desi ghee (73 per cent) daily. More than half of the respondents' mothers believed bajra, maize (corn), some pulses, bathua (Chenopodium album) and fenugreek leaves, onion, garlic, ginger, desi ghee and sweets are hot foods. According to the 24‐hour recall method for three consecutive days, the daily mean intake of all foodstuffs, namely, cereals, pulses, green leafy vegetables, roots and tubers, other vegetables, fruits, fats and oils, milk and milk products and sugar and jaggery was lower than their respective recommended dietary intake in the daily diets of preschool children.

Originality/value

On the basis of findings of this study, nutrition policy makers can plan the strategies for improving the nutritional status of preschool children who are an important segment of the Indian population.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Kolawole Ogundari

The aim of this study is in twofolds. First, to take a critical look at nutrient consumed and its trends and second, to examine the relationship between share of nutrient…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is in twofolds. First, to take a critical look at nutrient consumed and its trends and second, to examine the relationship between share of nutrient consumed across selected food groups and per capita income in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses seemingly unrelated regressions.

Findings

The result of the first objective reveals that the average calorie, protein and fat intakes were still below the recommended daily allowance since the 1960s as diets in Nigeria remained very much cereal-based over the years. Also, the results of objective two show that calorie, protein, and fat share of animal products respond positively but inelastic to the per capita income growth in Nigeria over the years.

Originality/value

Contrary to previous studies, the present study is designed not to fit aggregated nutrient demand from various food items as a function of income, but to relate the nutrient share of each homogenous and heterogeneous food product categories to the aggregated nutrient intake from these food groups and per capita income in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Clara R.B. Oguntona, Monsurat Apoyin and Anne‐Marie Olateju

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food…

Abstract

The food and nutrient intake of 250 (135 male, 115 female) adolescent Nigerian high school students have been surveyed to determine the contributions of different food groups to their intakes of protein, calcium and iron. Twenty‐four‐hour dietary recall technique was used to obtain details of food intake and questionnaires administered to obtain social and economic circumstances of subjects’ family. Male subjects had more energy, protein, calcium and iron intake but no significant (p < 0.05) differences when compared with females. Cereal based foods were the most important sources of dietary protein, supplying between 40‐52 per cent for all subjects and 60 per cent or more for 29 per cent of the subjects. Proportions of dietary protein from legumes, meats, vegetables and roots ranged from10‐21 per cent, 3‐13 per cent, 7‐17 per cent, 6.5‐12.9 per cent respectively. Cereals were also the most important source of dietary calcium (56.8 per cent) and iron (33.16 per cent) for most subjects. The contribution of meats and legumes however, approximate that of cereals for 36 per cent of subjects. Apart from gender, residence at home or in boarding house and the socio‐economic status of the subject’s family significantly affect the sources of dietary protein, calcium and iron.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Abiodun Elijah Obayelu, V.O. Okoruwa and O.I.Y. Ajani

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of socio‐economic variables on households' food demand. This paper derived the indirect utility function in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of socio‐economic variables on households' food demand. This paper derived the indirect utility function in terms of expenditure and price through the use of nonlinear demand quadratic almost ideal demand system (QUAIDS) model to estimate price, expenditure and elasticities of food items consumed in the North‐Central, Nigeria, and the impact of the socio‐economic variables on households' food demand.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary data used came from random selection of 396 households between 2006 and 2007 through a stratified random sampling procedure from Kwara and Kogi states making up the North Central zone in Nigeria.

Findings

All own price elasticities of the six food groups analyzed (root and tubers – RT, cereal – CR, legume – LG, animal protein – AP, fruits and vegetable – FV, fats and oil) showed that they are price inelastic. The results of income elasticity show that AP consumption is the most sensitive to income changes, while fats and oil is the least sensitive to income changes. Factors that positively and significantly affected demand for LG, FV, AP, CR and RT were household size (HSZ), level of education, primary occupation, access to credit, presence of children ≤6 years mainly at P<0.01. HSZ (P<0.01) negatively affected demand for AP.

Originality/value

This paper is original and novel in that it examines the impact of socio‐economic variables on households' food demand. High‐income elasticities of demand for all the food groups in QUAIDS except fruits and vegetable, as well as fats and oils, suggests that income‐generating policies will foster higher levels of consumption for these commodities.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Demelash Hailu Mitiku and Tilahun Abera Teka

The purpose of this study was to compare the nutrient and antinutrient content of two improved sweet potato varieties released for drought prone areas of eastern Ethiopia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to compare the nutrient and antinutrient content of two improved sweet potato varieties released for drought prone areas of eastern Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

Matured roots of two sweet potato varieties, namely, Berkume and Adu, were collected from Haramaya University, Toni Research Farm, Ethiopia. The sweet potatoes were ground into flour following standard procedure. Thereafter, proximate, dietary minerals and β-carotene were determined by official methods of analysis. The tannin and phytate contents were determined by colorimetric methods.

Findings

The moisture, protein, fat, fiber, ash, utilizable carbohydrate and gross energy varied from 6.23-6.61 per cent, 2.07-2.76 per cent, 1.25-1.52 per cent, 1.04-1.16 per cent, 3.38- 5.32 per cent, 90.03-91.45 per cent and 382.18-388.07 Kcal/100 g in both the sweet potato varieties. Potassium content (176.17 mg/100 g) was reported to be the highest and registered in Berkume variety, while the lowest mineral content (2.18 mg/100 g) determined was zinc in Adu sweet potato variety. The highest total carotenoid content (3.39mg/100 g) was recorded in Berkume sweet potato variety. The tannin and phytic acid contents ranged from 9.98 to 12.94 mg/100 g and from 0.24 to 0.31 mg/100 g in Berkume and Adu sweet potato varieties, respectively.

Originality/value

This study showed that the Berkume sweet potato variety has high nutritional potential and less antinutrient contents as compared with the nutritional value of many other roots and tuber crops documented in the FAO database and hence can contribute to reducing malnutrition in resource-poor settings of Ethiopia. Further work needs to be carried out on developing value-added products from Berkume sweet potato variety for its extensive utilization.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Ardon C.W. Iton

The purpose of this paper is to identify the demographic characteristics that influence the choice of retail outlet and the preferred retail outlet used by primary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the demographic characteristics that influence the choice of retail outlet and the preferred retail outlet used by primary household shoppers when purchasing roots and tubers (R&Ts).

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a binary logit model to estimate the probability of being a traditional or modern outlet shopper for R&Ts.

Findings

The traditional retail outlet was the preferred place to purchase R&Ts. Three demographic variables, age, monthly family income and ethnicity, were statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size might be considered small with only 232 primary household food shoppers participating.

Originality/value

To date, minimal research on the marketing of R&Ts has been undertaken in Trinidad and Tobago. As such, it is hoped that this study will stimulate others to undertake research in this area.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2016

Pilar Useche and Jennifer Twyman

We examine the joint demand for components of a household’s diet diversity and its relationship with household and regional characteristics that embody diverse food access…

Abstract

Purpose

We examine the joint demand for components of a household’s diet diversity and its relationship with household and regional characteristics that embody diverse food access and utilization constraints within the framework of the dietary patterns of rice producers in Peru.

Methodology/approach

We use multivariate probit regression to account for the simultaneous nature of the choice of different dietary group components.

Findings

There are diverse food intake patterns for households, depending on their wealth, education, demographic structure, market access and geographic location, as well as past shocks. There are also several obesogenic foods that are complements to consumption, with milk being a strong substitute for some of them. Of particular concern is the high vulnerability of female-headed households to low consumption of micronutrient-rich foods as well as the high vulnerability of households with children to high consumption of beverages with added sugars. Climate shocks are also highly associated with poor diet quality.

Practical implications

Results show the important influence of trade on household nutrition and food security. They indicate that policy and program recommendations should focus on nutrition information (such as labeling requirements) and education so that consumers can make informed decisions. They also suggest that policy makers should focus on how to make healthy foods available during crises to prevent health issues after economic and climatic shocks.

Details

Food Security in a Food Abundant World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-215-3

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Gertrude Nneka Onyeji and Rasaki Ajani Sanusi

The purpose of this is study is to evaluate the diet quality in nine local government areas drawn from three states of the south-east geo-political zone of Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this is study is to evaluate the diet quality in nine local government areas drawn from three states of the south-east geo-political zone of Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-stage sampling procedure yielded 1,200 women of childbearing age (15-49 years), who responded to a multi-pass 24-hour diet recall questionnaire at the household. Diet quality (DQ) was assessed using the “diet quality index international” (DQI-I) tool with a scale of 0-100.

Findings

Mean age of respondents was 28 ± 5.6 years and body mass index was 26.81 ± 4.8 kg/m2. Majorities (96 per cent) were married, 53.2 per cent had complete secondary and 18 per cent post-secondary education, 41.7 per cent were traders, 14.3 per cent civil servants and 25.8 per cent were unemployed. Main staple foods included root and tubers, cereals, legumes and vegetables. The total DQ in the South-east was 58.8 ± 8.1 with a low “variety” (9.5 ± 3.0), poor “adequacy” (22.3 ± 4.7), good “moderation” (25.0 ± 3.8) and “overall balance” (2.0 ± 1.8).The total DQ in Imo, Enugu and Anambra were 58.6 ± 8.3, 58.8 ± 8.0 and 59.0 ± 8.1, respectively (P > 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to three states in South-east Nigeria; it does not give a holistic view of the DQ of women of childbearing age in Nigeria.

Originality/value

The total DQ-I score revealed average overall DQ (59/100) for South-east. However, distinct patterns of low consumption of fruits and vegetables were identified. The need for national (and cross-continental) comparison of DQ using the DQI-I tool is hereby advocated.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Samuel Darko-Koomson, Robert Aidoo and Tahirou Abdoulaye

Commercialization of cassava is increasing because of increased urban demand for processed products and increased recognition of the industrial potential of the crop. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Commercialization of cassava is increasing because of increased urban demand for processed products and increased recognition of the industrial potential of the crop. This study aims to examine the cassava value chain in Ghana and its implications for upgrading.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of purposive, simple random and snowball sampling methods was adopted to select key actors in the cassava value chain. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect primary data. Analysis of the data was largely descriptive, except for profitability of cassava production in selected regions, which was examined by employing gross and net marketing margin analysis. A comprehensive value chain map was generated to show the different product pathways for cassava from the farm gate to the final consumer, and roles of key value chain actors and their relationships were summarized through simple narrations.

Findings

Evidence has shown chains of more than four different channels through which fresh cassava roots move from the farm gate to final consumers. Production of cassava in Ghana is profitable, generating positive net marketing margins across major producing centres. Processing of cassava has both dry and wet/fresh value chains depending on the derived products for the final consumer. There is weak governance system in the cassava value chain in Ghana as majority of actors use spot market transactions in dealing with trading partners. The use of standardized grading and weighing system is very limited in the chain, and limited access to credit is a critical constraint to value chain upgrading.

Research limitations/implications

With the exception of results from the profitability analysis of producers, the findings on marketing margins of other value chain actors may not be generalizable. Future studies could determine the profitability associated with cassava value-adding activities like processing into various forms and explore the possibility of converting waste from processing into energy.

Practical implications

The study includes implications that focus on product and process upgrading efforts by smallholders in the cassava value chain. This paper recommends innovative financing models for smallholders to improve access to microcredit via internal and external funding sources.

Originality/value

This paper reveals specific intervention areas in which smallholders can direct efforts in an attempt to improve the cassava value chain through product, process and functional upgrading.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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