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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Sameer Mathur and Ashish Dubey

This paper identifies and models the effect of eight attributes that influence hotel room rents in India. These attributes are conceptually grouped into three factors: (1…

Abstract

This paper identifies and models the effect of eight attributes that influence hotel room rents in India. These attributes are conceptually grouped into three factors: (1) site factors including the presence or absence of a “swimming pool,” “free breakfast,” and the “hotel capacity”; (2) situational factors including, “distance from the airport,” “weekend/weekday,” “city population,” “cost of living”; and (3) a reputation factor indicated by “star rating.” Our regression model uses secondary data collected from a hotel booking website for 570 hotels across 18 cities of India. The results indicate that six out of these eight variables namely, presence of swimming pool, free breakfast, hotel capacity, distance from the airport, city population, and hotel star rating have a significant impact on hotel room rents in India.

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Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-956-9

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Clarkson M. Wanie, Emmanuel E.E. Oben, Jeff Mbella Molombe and Ivo T. Tassah

Given the importance of hostels to students’ welfare and academic performance and recognition of the roles youths can play for affordable university housing, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of hostels to students’ welfare and academic performance and recognition of the roles youths can play for affordable university housing, this study aims to investigate hostel management problems in the Buea Municipality, an educational hub in the South West Region of Cameroon. It explores potentials for youth advocacy for affordable university housing within the process of efficient hostel management.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through a descriptive survey design from May to July 2015 via reconnaissance surveys, field observation, photographs, administration of questionnaires to hostel tenants (students) and interviews with hostel managers and law enforcement officials. The data have been presented and analysed using descriptive statistical techniques involving frequency tables, charts and percentages. Cartographic techniques have also been used to locate the study area.

Findings

It was found that hostel management problems in Buea stem from flaws arising from both hostel managers (landlords and/or caretakers) and hostel tenants (students) in contravention to affordable student housing and good governance principles of rent control, accountability, transparency, equality, participation and fairness. The notable hostel management problems found are indiscriminate rent increase, lack of transparency in billing and non-functional sub metres and non-refund of caution deposits by hostel managers, as well as violation of hostel rules, damage of hostel facilities and “selling of rooms” by hostel tenants.

Originality/value

This paper contends that youths have to be mainstreamed in the hostel management process with better platforms of advocating for affordable university students’ housing through rent control and other good governance practices in their hostel setting. It is hoped that the proposed efficient hostel management system and mainstreaming youth-led advocacy activities in affordable university students’ housing will go a long way to enhance students’ welfare and academic performance, help in rent control, fight against bribery and corruption and other governance problems.

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International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Avijit Sarkar, Mehrdad Koohikamali and James B. Pick

In recent years, short-term sharing accommodation platforms such as Airbnb have made rapid forays in populous cities worldwide, impacting neighborhoods profoundly…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, short-term sharing accommodation platforms such as Airbnb have made rapid forays in populous cities worldwide, impacting neighborhoods profoundly. Emerging work has focused on demand-side motivations to engage in the sharing economy. The purpose of this paper is to analyze rarely examined supply-side motivations of providers.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this gap and to illuminate understanding of how Airbnb supply is configured and influenced, this study examines spatial patterns and socioeconomic influences on participation in the sharing accommodation economy by Airbnb hosts in New York City (NYC). An exploratory conceptual model of host participation is induced, which posits associations of demographic, economic, employment, social capital attributes, and attitudes toward trust and sustainability with host participation, measured by Airbnb property density in neighborhoods. Methods employed include ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, k-means cluster analysis and spatial analytics.

Findings

Spatially, clusters of high host densities are in Manhattan and northern Brooklyn and there is little proportionate change longitudinally. OLS regression findings reveal that gender ratio, black race/ethnicity, median household income, and professional, scientific, and technical occupation, and attitudes toward sustainability for property types are dominant correlates of property density, while host trust in customers is not supported.

Research limitations/implications

These results along with differences between Queens and Manhattan boroughs have implications for hosts sharing their homes and for city managers to formulate policies and regulate short-term rental markets in impacted neighborhoods.

Originality/value

The study is novel in conceptualizing and analyzing the supply-side provider motivations of the sharing accommodation economy. Geostatistical analysis of property densities to gauge host participation is novel. Value stems from new insights on NYC’s short-term homesharing market.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Zafirah Al Sadat Zyed, Mun Yee Yong and Peter Aning Tedong

Drawing from available literature and several case studies, this research aims to determine the criteria to be considered in shaping a framework regulating Airbnb. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from available literature and several case studies, this research aims to determine the criteria to be considered in shaping a framework regulating Airbnb. This paper will identify the regulatory frameworks of Airbnb from an international perspective and investigate the public perception on the criteria to be considered in shaping the framework regulating Airbnb. The criteria needed to be considered to regulate Airbnb are suggested accordingly.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach based on central tendency statistics was adopted in this research. Questionnaires were administered to the public to investigate the public's opinion on the criteria to be considered to regulate Airbnb. Finally, the criteria to be considered to regulate Airbnb will be determined. By using the mean analysis, this paper will tease out the ranking of the criteria that should be prioritized in shaping the Airbnb regulatory framework.

Findings

The results indicated that the criteria of “permits and safety” and “housing rules enforcement” outweigh the other “taxes” and “rule enforcement” criteria and shall be prioritized by the local authorities during the formation of Airbnb regulations in Malaysia.

Originality/value

This paper provides valuable pointers for policymakers before the expansion of Airbnb and before it becomes more difficult to regulate.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Aihui Chen, Ying Yu and Yaobin Lu

The peer-to-peer (P2P) accommodation-sharing market has developed rapidly on the strength of information technology in recent years. Matching providers and customers in an…

Abstract

Purpose

The peer-to-peer (P2P) accommodation-sharing market has developed rapidly on the strength of information technology in recent years. Matching providers and customers in an information technology (IT)-enabled platform is a key determinant of both parties' experiences and the healthy development of the platform. However, previous research has not sufficiently explained the mechanism of provider–customer matching in accommodation sharing, especially at the psychological level. Based on field cognitive style theory, this study examines how the match and mismatch affect customers' online and offline satisfaction and whether a significant difference exists between online and offline satisfaction under different matching patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the proposed theoretical model using 122 provider–customer dyad data collected through a field study.

Findings

The results suggest that customers' online and offline satisfaction under match is significantly higher than that under mismatch. In addition, customers' online satisfaction is significantly higher than their offline satisfaction under mismatch, but there is no significant difference between the two under match. The perceived price fairness also plays a moderating role in the case of mismatch.

Originality/value

In summary, these findings provide a novel understanding about the matching patterns and their outcomes in the accommodation-sharing context and expand the contents and applications of field cognitive style theory and matching theory. This study will help these IT-enabled platforms to provide personalized matching services at the psychological level, thereby enhancing user experience and corporate competitiveness. 10; 10;

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Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Cheri A. Young, David L. Corsun and Karen L. Xie

The purpose of this study was to investigate travelers’ preferences for peer-to-peer (P2P) accommodations or hotels when traveling for leisure or business purposes given…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate travelers’ preferences for peer-to-peer (P2P) accommodations or hotels when traveling for leisure or business purposes given the rise of P2P accommodations in the form of Airbnb, Vacation Rentals by Owners (VRBO) One Fine Stay, etc.

Design/methodology/approach

VRBO hosts in Denver, Colorado, USA provided contact information for 788 travelers who stayed with them over the prior three years. These travelers received an email survey and the opportunity to be entered in a drawing for one of three US$250 gift cards.

Findings

P2P usage was driven by leisure travel. The most influential factors in the choice of P2P over hotel were price, location, party size, dwelling size and trip length. When choosing a hotel for business travel, the influential factors were location, safety and security, price and knowing what one will receive in the way of facility and services.

Research limitations/implications

The external validity of the findings is limited as the study was conducted in one US city using travelers of only one P2P accommodations platform.

Practical implications

Hotels may want to leverage their loyalty programs and stress the importance of safety and security when traveling as a means of competing with P2P accommodations.

Originality/value

Given limited empirical research on P2P accommodations, this study provides an informative first look at the preferences and behaviors of travelers using P2P accommodations and points to a growing loyalty to P2P accommodations versus hotels in the leisure segment.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2015

Richard K. Reed

The forests of eastern Paraguayan have been cleared, forcing the indigenous Mbyá-Guaraní to take refuge in cities. Rather than assimilate into the city’s underclass as…

Abstract

Findings

The forests of eastern Paraguayan have been cleared, forcing the indigenous Mbyá-Guaraní to take refuge in cities. Rather than assimilate into the city’s underclass as other indigenous people do, Mbyá remain on the margins of the national society and protest their land loss in increasingly public demonstrations against the government. This research points to the historical struggle that the Mbyá-Guaraní of eastern Paraguay have waged against the state to explain Mbyá identity and action in the urban environment.

Research limitations/implications

Recent work with indigenous refugees shows that dislocation entails not only a disruption of social ties, but efforts to reestablish identities and relations in their new conditions. This research explores the interplay of urban conditions and historic struggles in the development of these new indigenous identities for the Mbyá-Guarani.

Practical implications

Indigenous refugees in extreme poverty are a growing problem in urban Latin America. Once residents of the forest, these groups squat in vacant lots and scavenge for a living, ravaged by disease, drugs, alcohol, and sex work. This work seeks to identify the factors that lead some indigenous people to integrate into urban society, while others assert themselves against that system.

Details

Climate Change, Culture, and Economics: Anthropological Investigations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-361-7

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Virginie Capitaine

The purpose of this paper is to report on the research carried out in Québec as part of a master’s degree for the IÉSEG School of Management on behalf of Kéroul, an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the research carried out in Québec as part of a master’s degree for the IÉSEG School of Management on behalf of Kéroul, an organization whose mission is to make tourism and culture accessible to people with disabilities. Established over 30 years ago and active largely in Québec, Kéroul has observed a lingering reluctance on the part of tourism industry operators to meeting the needs of disabled visitors. In the research, we set out to answer the following question: how can Kéroul encourage tourism establishments to develop accessibility? In light of the hotel industry’s key role in tourism, exploratory research was conducted with 30 Québec hotel managers through extensive individual interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory research took the form of in-depth interviews with hotel managers. The sample was selected after conferring with Kéroul and a Québec hotel association. As a first step, a jointly written letter was sent to managers who were association members, inviting them to be interviewed.

Findings

Some respondents showed an interest in accessibility, seen as a means of attracting group bookings; others confirmed that accessible rooms rented well to guests from all categories. Nonetheless, most were skeptical about the economic value of the disabled market. They were also poorly informed about this type of clientele, the concept of accessibility and the facilities “barrier-free” tourism requires.

Originality/value

Until now, the literature on accessible tourism has generally accentuated the needs of disabled consumers and analyzed their behavior with regard to tourism. Arguments to demonstrate the market potential of tourists with disabilities have ensued. The need to meet this demand was expressed while highlighting the low degree of consideration given to the disabled market by tourism professionals at present. However, few publications treat accessibility as a viable business opportunity. The study reveals the concerns and views of tourism industry professionals vis-à-vis accessibility and is all the more relevant, given the current context in Québec.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

William A.V. Clark, Marinus C. Deurloo and Frans M. Dieleman

Residential mobility is the process by which households attempt to harmonize their housing needs with their housing consumption. However, since houses are geographically…

Abstract

Residential mobility is the process by which households attempt to harmonize their housing needs with their housing consumption. However, since houses are geographically inseparable from their neighbourhoods, when households move they also change their locations and their neighbourhoods. This paper examines how households make relative selections when they move between improving their housing consumption and improving the quality of their neigh-bourhoods. We found that households gain in both housing quality and neighbourhood quality, and in many cases, maintain the same housing quality, but gain in neighbourhood quality.

Details

Open House International, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Gisela Bichler, Karin Schmerler and Janet Enriquez

This paper aims to evaluate a problem‐oriented policing project that used regulatory policy to foster responsible place management among operators of nuisance motels…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate a problem‐oriented policing project that used regulatory policy to foster responsible place management among operators of nuisance motels located in Southern California.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methodological approach was used to ensure that a comprehensive assessment captured substantive outcomes, as well as implementation issues and displacement effects.

Findings

Each component of the initiative generated some success, with the greatest crime reduction achieved when all motels were in full compliance with the permit‐to‐operate ordinance. Consistency in key project staff was critical to maintaining program integrity.

Research limitations/implications

The displacement analysis suggests that crime prevention evaluations would benefit from a facilities orientation that identifies locations that might host crime if the targeted sites are rendered inopportune. And, net effects can be applied to facilities research using standardized crime rates.

Practical implications

Ends‐based regulatory policy offers law enforcement an alternative to conventional crime control strategies. Responsibility for crime prevention can be shifted to place managers to reduce the incidents of crime and disorder (reported and unreported to police). Ancillary benefits include better city‐industry communication and more efficient use of city resources.

Originality/value

This research is valuable to police agencies considering the use of ordinances to address crime and disorder problems plaguing risky facilities.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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