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1 – 10 of 36
Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Gaspar Brändle and Olga García

The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough assessment of the current statistical sources in Spain, as well as new indicators that extend and improve the European…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough assessment of the current statistical sources in Spain, as well as new indicators that extend and improve the European Typology on Homelessness and Housing Exclusion (ETHOS) to better address every housing exclusion situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The main categories of the ETHOS typology are reviewed: definition, subcategories and the availability of data and statistical sources in Spain. The assessment of the information available is carried out by considering objective and subjective indicators. Additionally, the inclusion of new subcategories is proposed.

Findings

The strengths and weaknesses of the ETHOS model when applied in the study of housing exclusion are highlighted, and the need to have an appropriate set of indicators for measuring housing exclusion is stressed. The ETHOS typology may be the reference conceptual framework to elaborate a system of housing exclusion indicators. However, it would be necessary to extent this model in order to cover some situations of exclusion risk owing to insecure housing for economic reasons and environmental degradation, and including the subjective assessment of the people affected by these processes.

Originality/value

This study implements the ETHOS methodology checking the statistical information available distinguishing between objective and subjective indicators. Further, this paper shows an integrated overview of the four main ETHOS categories (rooflessness, houselessness, insecure and inadequate housing) with the four types of housing restrictions (accessibility, stability, adequacy and habitability).

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Joan Smith

This article aims to describe methodological issues in relation to the definition of homelessness and the drawing of samples of young homeless people in four European…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to describe methodological issues in relation to the definition of homelessness and the drawing of samples of young homeless people in four European countries. The purposes of the research project were, first, to make a comparison of different homeless situations facing young people in these four countries, and second, to introduce early intervention and action planning methodologies developed in the UK and The Netherlands to other countries in the study – Portugal (a family welfare society) and the Czech Republic (an ex‐communist regime redeveloping its welfare policies).

Design/methodology/approach

After extensive discussions and key worker interviews with local agencies, 54 homeless young people were interviewed in each country. Each sample was intended to be purposive in that it should recruit homeless young men and women from those born in that country from the dominant (white) ethnic group, born in that country from minority ethnic groups, and young people not born in that country. A major issue was how to define homelessness in order to be able to recruit across the spectrum of homeless youth.

Findings

The purposive samples recruited in the four countries reflected the availability of services in those countries and levels of family support. Whilst young homeless people in The Netherlands and the UK were mostly living in supported housing, in Portugal they were living as “hidden homeless” and in the Czech Republic on the streets or in squats.

Research limitations/implications

The methodological difficulties encountered during the project are themselves a useful lesson learnt, for the creation of trans‐national understanding and politicy.

Practical implications

Nevertheless, despite the very different circumstances of limited services in Portugal and the Czech Republic, it appeared that both early intervention methods and key working approaches could be applied broadly across the EU.

Originality/value

Transnational studies of youth homelessness are rare and therefore produce particularly useful insights for research, policy and practice.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1941

TRAGEDY has touched many libraries in the past few weeks, but the really sporting manner in which has been met the worst that the Nazi bomber can do places librarians, we…

Abstract

TRAGEDY has touched many libraries in the past few weeks, but the really sporting manner in which has been met the worst that the Nazi bomber can do places librarians, we hope, fully in line with our people. Roofless rooms have been patched, sometimes merely with canvas and felt, empty houses have been taken over, and by similar expedients even in the worst places a library service has been continued. It has been used, too. There is no fear for the future of the book and reading, whatever difficulties impede them. It has become almost commonplace that reading is a main employment of war leisure; but we still have to get that over to the powers that be. Or have we? The Board of Education wrote to local authorities asking them to maintain and even to extend library facilities as their value in war was enhanced. Some have responded.

Details

New Library World, vol. 43 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Erik Amundson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the European transnational migration of poverty in a regional context, specifically focusing on homelessness among the migrant poor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the European transnational migration of poverty in a regional context, specifically focusing on homelessness among the migrant poor in Norway and Sweden. Gathering insight from individuals who routinely assist with social care, this research seeks to find out if the liberal provision of welfare and supportive services attracts poor migrants to this region from other parts of Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative in-depth interviews with individuals who provide social care assistance to homeless migrants in Oslo and Stockholm.

Findings

The influx of people experiencing homelessness in these areas is comprised mainly of two distinct sub-populations. One group migrated in search of employment opportunities but struggled with tenuous working and living arrangements. A second more transient group appeared to be motivated by perceptions of Scandinavian benevolence and charity. Both groups lacked familiarity with the social welfare system but were generally uninhibited by cultural differences between their destination and country of origin.

Research limitations/implications

The intent of this study is not to generalize to a broader population but to develop an in-depth exploration of homelessness and migration from the perspective of social care workers. Purposive sampling is used to gather insights from key informants that work closely with homeless migrants; however the findings can be limited by the unique experiences of each individual.

Practical implications

In the public discourse on homelessness it is a mistake to group all homeless migrants together. Additionally it is important to distinguish between the needs of migrants and non-migrants, as these two homeless populations generally do not struggle with the same issues.

Originality/value

With a better understanding of this issue, governments will be able to provide more adequate assistance and develop more effective initiatives to combat and prevent homelessness.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2018

Danielle Every and John Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to propose a practice framework for disaster resilience education (DRE) with homeless communities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a practice framework for disaster resilience education (DRE) with homeless communities.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with 163 homeless service providers together with 45 interviews with people with a lived experience of homelessness, homeless service providers and emergency services.

Findings

Key principles for DRE with the homeless community were: safe relationships, collaboration, strengths-based, empowerment, providing essential resources, and inclusivity. Recommendations for the design of DRE foregrounded partnerships and knowledge sharing between the homeless community and emergency services. Locally relevant risk information and material supports, together with sharing stories and eliciting values were important considerations for developing DRE content. Preferred delivery methods were outreach to build on trusted relationships and existing services, together with written material in large font emphasising images for distribution through drop in centres, food vans and new tenancy packages.

Practical implications

The key principles, together with the detailed suggestions outlining ways to translate the principles into actions, can be used by emergency and homeless services to develop effective DRE materials and programmes.

Social implications

The proposed DRE framework aims to not only enhance disaster risk knowledge, but also address the exclusion, isolation and disempowerment experienced by people who are homeless. By building on an effective intervention models within homeless services (Trauma-Informed Care) DRE can enhance the social connection, self-confidence and well-being goals of homeless services and clients.

Originality/value

The DRE framework is based on the first comprehensive Australian research with homeless services, clients and emergency managers on best practice for improving extreme weather preparedness in the homeless community.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2022

Rupa Kalahasthi, Jacob Wadsworth, Cory A. Crane, Jonathan Toole, Cassandra Berbary and Caroline J. Easton

Homelessness is a growing concern across the globe that has multiplied during the pandemic. According to a recent report by the Department of Housing and Urban Development…

Abstract

Purpose

Homelessness is a growing concern across the globe that has multiplied during the pandemic. According to a recent report by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD, 2018), 20% of the homeless population have a severe mental illness and 16% chronically used substances. This paper aims to address the effectiveness of in-shelter mental health services provided by qualified clinicians.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, clients from a homeless shelter were provided in-shelter mental health intake and resources by predoctoral clinicians. Their pre- and postdistress scores were recorded to establish the effectiveness of the intervention.

Findings

Ninety-eight guests were provided services of which 51% reported co-occurring mental health and substance use diagnoses. There was a clinically significant difference in the pre- to postsession distress levels based on the ratings at the intake session. It was noted that making services accessible increased the ability to provide triage services, help with housing options and integrate care with other providers and decrease distress levels.

Research limitations/implications

The current program was implemented in only one shelter in Upstate New York, other similar settings need to be explored in different locations. Objective indicators will be analyzed in the future to establish the effectiveness of services.

Practical implications

This paper outlines a procedure that can guide and help future projects to establish clinical care at homeless shelters across the USA and globally. This paper provides examples of the intake form, list of resources and basic coping strategies that can aid other clinicians and researchers to establish similar programs.

Social implications

This paper sheds light on the mental health needs of an underserved and underrepresented population in the field of mental health – the homeless. The guidelines outlined in this paper can help set up more mental health clinics at homeless shelters and make mental health services more accessible, which can help prevent recurring homelessness.

Originality/value

This paper establishes guidelines for effective single session interventions that help decrease distress levels. This paper also establishes the need for in-shelter services to overcome barriers in mental health care for the homeless population.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Forming and Centering
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-829-5

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2018

Sadra Sahebzadeh, Zahra Dalvand, Milad Sadeghfar and Ali Heidari

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and discuss 11 strategies and 11 sets of tools to provide a knowledge background on how native people of Iran have come up with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and discuss 11 strategies and 11 sets of tools to provide a knowledge background on how native people of Iran have come up with innovative solutions to create a sustainable and comfortable living environment within the confinement of their homes, in harsh environment of Iran’s hot-arid and hot-humid regions.

Design/methodology/approach

These strategies include density, building orientation, introversion, design for four seasons, using local materials, using the ground’s thermal capacity, natural wind induced ventilation, using walls’ thickness and porosity, Panãm (insulation), using special native additive elements and integration of water and plants into the building. Discussed tools include water, courtyard, Showãdãn, Bahãr-khãb, roof, korsi room, ratio and Pãyãb, Sardãb and Howz-khãneh, Shanãshil, Bãdgir and Eivãn.

Findings

In conclusion, interrelations between these strategies and tools are illustrated in order to provide a collection of guidelines and inspirations for those involved in the building industry in Iran and Middle East to come up with innovative solutions for creating a sustainable and comfortable living environment in this region’s climates.

Originality/value

This paper provides a collection of guidelines and inspirations for those involved in the building industry in Iran and Middle East to come up with innovative solutions for creating a sustainable and comfortable living environment in this region’s climates.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 10 September 2020

GREECE: State can lend Lesbos migrants limited relief

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES255167

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Lawrence W.C. Lai, Stephen N.G. Davies, Y.K. Tan and P. Yung

This paper aims to provide an initial determination of the date of construction, locations and a typology of design of the pill‐boxes of the Gin Drinker's Line constructed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an initial determination of the date of construction, locations and a typology of design of the pill‐boxes of the Gin Drinker's Line constructed by the colonial Hong Kong Government.

Design/methodology/approach

Post‐war aerial photos taken by the Royal Air Force and R.C. Huntings were examined and site visits made to locate and measure the pill‐boxes. Relevant archive materials were consulted to help interpret findings.

Findings

A total of 76 pill‐boxes, most in ruins due to post‐war destruction for obtaining their steel bars, were mapped on a 1:25,000 scale to give a good idea of the nature of the Gin Drinker's Line. The study finds that, of these, 50 have survived. The pill‐boxes predated those built in the UK to anticipate of German landing.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates how aerial photos can be used for historical research and conservation planning. Though the locations of the pill‐boxes identified are subject to detailed site surveying, the basic pattern of pill‐box distribution has been identified.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to map the Gin Drinker's Line and classify its pill‐boxes. The findings are useful references for the actual conservation of colonial heritage in Hong Kong as part of China, as well as for further inquiry into the military history of the Second World War.

Details

Property Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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